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Mike Conley: Much Ado About Brendan (or As I’ve Seen It)

mo, 07/04/2014 - 10:30

Since Brendan Eich’s resignation, I’ve been struggling to articulate what I think and feel about the matter. It’s been difficult. I haven’t been able to find what I wanted to say. Many other better, smarter, and more qualified Mozillians have written things about this, and I was about to let it go. I didn’t just want to say “me too”.

I felt I had nothing of substance to contribute. I feebly wrote something about Brendan Eich and the Kobayashi Maru, but it became a rambling mess, and the analogy fell apart quite quickly. I was about to call it quits on contributing my thoughts.

And then this post happened.

Don’t ask me where this came from. A muse woke me up in the night to write it (it’s just past 4AM for crying out loud – muse, let me sleep). Maybe through the lens of this nonsense, some real sense will prevail. I’m not hopeful, but this muse is nodding emphatically (and grinning like a lunatic).

Please believe that I’m not at all trying to trivialize, oversimplify, or make light of the events of the past few weeks by writing this. I’m just trying to understand it, and view it with a looking glass I have at least a little familiarity with.

And maybe it’s mostly catharsis.

I also apologize that it’s not really told like a story from the Bard. I think that’d be too long winded (no offense, Shakey). I’m pretty sure the narrator / stage directions have the most lines. It’s actually quite criminal.

And I also apologize that it’s not in iambic pentameter – that’d probably be more appropriate, but I have neither the wit nor the patience to pull this off with that much verisimilitude.

Oooh! Verisimilitude! Fancy words! Enough apologies, let’s get started.

Much Ado About Brendan (or As I’ve Seen It) Prologue

Venice, Italy. Sometime during the Renaissance. This glorious city is composed of many families – the Montague’s, the Capulet’s, the Macbeth’s, the MacDuff’s, the Aguecheeks, the Fortanbras, the Whitmore’s, and many many more. Too many to name or count.

Many of these families argue and disagree about things. There’s almost always one thing that one family does or thinks that another family just cannot abide by.

It is in this turbulent city of families that we find The Merchant’s Building. The Merchant’s of Venice are selling their wares, lending or selling books, playing music, and much more – and people are constantly streaming in and out. It’s a marketplace of endless possibility.

In one section of The Merchant’s Building, is the Mozilla booth. Mozilla does and makes many things – but it’s probably best known for its Firefox jewelry. Mozilla is one of a small number of merchants giving away jewelry – and jewelry, in this building, is special: the more people wear your jewelry, the more of a voice you have at the Merchant’s Weekly Meeting, where the rules of the building are written and refined.

So what is special about this Mozilla merchant? Why should we wear their jewelry? There are certainly other merchants giving away jewelry a few booths down. What does Mozilla bring to the table?

For one thing, the jewelry is beautiful. And it makes you walk faster. And it’s got the latest features. And it makes it harder for sketchy people to follow you. And it doesn’t have a built-in tracking device recording which merchants you’re visiting. And you can add cool charms to it, and make it look exactly how you want it.

And another thing that’s unique to the Mozilla booth is that they’re composed of members of every single family in Venice. Every single family has at least one member working in the Mozilla booth. And what’s more – a bunch of these workers are volunteering their time and efforts to make this stuff!

Why? Why do they volunteer? And why do these family members work side by side with people their families might balk at, or sneer at?

Well, In the very center of the Mozilla booth, overhanging the whole thing, is… The Mission. The Mission is the guiding principals upon which the Mozilla booth operates. This is what these family members bury their gauntlets for. They work, sweat and bleed side by side for this mission. This is their connective tissue. This is what guides them when they vote and argue for things at the Merchant’s Weekly Meeting.

The other truly unique thing about the Mozilla booth is that there are no walls to it! You can walk right in, and watch the craftspeople make jewelry! Heck, you can sit right down at a bench and somebody will show you how to make some yourself. They’ll guide you, and they’ll critique you, and soon, somebody will be wearing a piece of jewelry that you made.

The greatest debates also occur within the Mozilla booth. People stand on soap boxes and give their opinions about jewelry, or other merchandise – or merchandise practices. People say what they think out loud, and perhaps print it on a t-shirt and wear it. Sometimes, discussions get heated, but level thinking usually prevails because these Mozillians are an unusually bright bunch.

ACT I

There is a leadership selection underway. Someone needs to be the Chief of Business Affairs (or CBA) in the Mozilla booth. The current chief, Jay, has been holding the position as an interim chief, and the Board of Business Affairs is trying to select someone to take the position permanently.

Two members of this board already have their bags packed – for a while now, they’ve been neglecting other interests of theirs, and after this chief is selected, they feel they need to do other things.

Enter Brendan Eich. Brendan Eich is chief craftsperson of the makers of jewelry in the Mozilla booth. He’s a brilliant and widely respected craftsperson himself, having invented some of the amazing techniques that are used by all serious jewelry makers. He is also one of the founders of the Mozilla booth, having set it up with Mitchell Baker.

The Board of Business Affairs selects Brendan to be the next Chief of Business Affairs.

They announce this, and there is much applause! People clap Brendan on the back. Many craftspeople are pleased that one of their own will be in charge.

The two board members, as they’ve agreed to, take their bags, salute, and walk off out of the booth and on to other things.

A third board member leaves as well, but for reasons not related to what I describe below.

Suddenly, several Montague’s and Montague supporters in the Mozillian booth grow concerned. They recall that several years ago, Brendan had donated $1000 dollars to a law that supported Capulet values – a law which impacted their rights. The Montague’s and Montague supporters grow concerned that someone who supports this Capulet law is not fit to be Chief of a booth that houses all of the families, Montague’s included.

Several of these Montague’s raise these concerns out loud. This is not unusual in the Mozilla booth, as most concerns are raised out loud – and, as usual, debate begins. Brendan states that he will 100% abide by the Mozilla participation guidelines, and what’s more, began supporting a project that a Montague in the Mozilla booth has been working on – to bring more Montague’s into the booth.

Vigorous debate continues, as is the Mozilla booth custom.

However, as the booth lets anybody in, and the debate can be heard outside of the booth, several Montague’s and Montague supporters hear these concerns and start passing the message along to one another – a Capulet has been selected to be the CBA!

Many of these Montague’s are reasonable, and say and write reasonable arguments about why they are concerned, and why Brendan may not be the right choice as CBA.

ACT II

A few meters away, the Cupid booth overhears all of this concern from the Montague’s. Perhaps they really are Montague supportors (or, more likely, they just wanted to perk up business), but they suddenly decide to take a stand. For people who try to come into their booth wearing Firefox jewelry, they have to read a big sign that tells them about why the Cupid booth believes that restricting the rights of Montague’s is terrible, and that the Mozilla booth is terrible for making a Capulet the CBA. They tell the people wearing Firefox jewelry that they should probably wear other things.

And so some people start to take off their Firefox jewelry. Some Montague’s take it off angrily, and smash it into the ground – stomping it with their feet, creating a big dust cloud.

Enter Iago, and his team of writers. There are many writers and story-sellers in the Merchant’s Building, but Iago is one of those writers that just wants people to listen to him. He likes to twist words and make things up, or to insinuate things that are not true. He saw the board members leaving the Mozilla booth and concocts some headlines, insinuating that they left in protest of Brendan’s support of the Capulet laws. He also writes about how all of the Mozillians in the booth were not supporting Brendan’s appointment as CBA (which is not true – it’s true that some were concerned and questioned the wisdom of his appointment, but certainly not all). He writes and he writes, and his messengers pass copies and leaflets around. Montague’s and Montague supporters read these leaflets, or hear people talking about them, and they grow very concerned. More Montague’s start to take off their Firefox jewelry.

Some Montague’s start to engage with Mozillians and try to figure out what is happening. As always, each family has calm and reasonable people to converse with – and that’s always welcome in the Mozilla booth.

However, every family also has their groundlings. The groundlings are the members of a family who are always looking for a fight. Always looking for blood. Always hoping an actor will forget their lines, and will shout distracting things at them to make it happen. They always have a bag of rotten fruit and vegetables with them to throw. Some of them just like to make trouble.

Every family has their groundlings. You’ve probably met some yourself.

The groundlings start to hear these rumors that Iago has been spreading around, copied and recopied, distorted and mutilated – and they see the signs at the Cupid booth.

And they rush the Mozilla booth! They start throwing rotten fruit and vegetables, and they tear off their Firefox jewelry, and swear to never wear it again! They gnash their teeth, and they rip out their own hair in a rage, and they scream and yell and make so much noise – it’s almost impossible for the craftspeople in the Mozilla booth to work!

A tempest of Montague rage was upon the Mozilla booth.

ACT III

After several hours of this, Brendan addresses the crowd outside, and speaks to some storytellers (Iago and his team are among them – he always is).

They ask him if he renounces Capulet ways, or if he will apologize for the Montague rights that were impacted by the Capulet law that he helped fund.

And Brendan says something along the lines of “I don’t think that’s helpful to discuss. I don’t think that’s relevant here. I’m not going to run this booth as if everybody in here were Capulets – I helped make this booth, I know that it’s composed of many families, and I know how it operates.”

But Iago and the groundlings were not satisfied. They put up signs and placards claiming that anybody wearing Firefox jewelry is supporting the Capulets!

The Mozillians look at all of the broken and stomped-on jewelry on the market ground. All their work, being trampled. If this continues, their ability to improve things for all families at the Merchant’s Weekly Meeting will fade. Their ability to enact their Mission will fade. They are agitated, discouraged, upset, angry, sad, anxious, confused – a cocktail of emotion playing pretty much the entire spectrum.

Brendan’s speech had not done anything to quell the groundlings. And Iago could smell blood, and was not going to stop writing about Brendan or Mozilla.

The other leaders look to Brendan. What will we do?

And Brendan said, “This noise is getting absurdly loud. How are we supposed to work under these conditions? There’s no way we can enact the mission like this.”

And Brendan steps onto the proscenium, and says:

To leave, or not to leave, that is the question—
Whether ’tis Nobler in the mind to suffer
The Slings and Arrows of outrageous Fortune,
Or to take Arms against a Sea of troubles,
And by opposing end them?

And so, after much thought, he takes arms. He sacrifices, and he chooses to leave the booth – the booth he helped plant into the ground over 15 years ago. The booth he helped build, the jewelry and techniques he helped craft.

“I think if I leave, you folks might have a chance to keep the mission going.”

And so he leaves, to the heartbreak of many Mozillians, and to the cheering of the Montague groundlings outside.

ACT IV

Several of the more sensible Montague’s watch Brendan leave and wonder if perhaps the groundlings in their family have made them look petty and vindictive. Some of them are also sad that Brendan left the Mozilla booth – all they wanted from him was an apology, they say. That would have sufficed, they say. They didn’t expect or want him to leave the whole booth.

But the damage is done, and Brendan has left. There is no chief craftsperson, and there is no CBA. Holy shit.

The Mozillians in the booth start to get back to work, since the cheers of the Montague’s outside are much easier to work against as a backdrop than the booing, hissing and food-throwing. A bunch of Montague’s dust off their stomped Firefox jewelry (or grab new copies!) and put them back on proudly. Others are happy with the new jewelry they got, and don’t care about the Mission. Still others never took off the Firefox jewelry, but said they did. And now they wear it publicly again, proudly.

But suddenly, the Capulets and Capulet supporters in and around the Mozilla booth look at this gaping void where Brendan was and sense injustice. This was wrong, they cry! This man should not have been chased out of here!

Vigorous debate begins, as is the Mozilla booth custom.

And reasonable Capulets say and write reasonable things about why they think it was wrong for Brendan to have left.

And Iago, who never really left the area, hears all of this, and smells more blood in the air. He takes his poison pen, and writes stories about how Brendan was forcibly removed from the Mozilla booth by an angry mob of Montague’s. He writes that, like Cesar, Brendan was heard gasping “Et tu, Brute?” as he was stabbed by his fellow senators – or, like King Hamlet, poisoned and betrayed by the people closest to him.

But as usual, Iago gets this completely wrong. Not that he cares or bothers to check. What a douche. And LOUD too, holy smokes. And people listen to Iago, and read what he writes, and hear what he says, and the rumours abound!

And a second tempest starts to brew.

ACT V

Many reasonable Capulets, both inside and outside of the Mozilla booth are concerned about what this means for them. Does this mean that Capulets aren’t allowed to become CBA’s? That’s certainly against the inclusiveness guidelines, is it not? And much debate resonated, as is the Mozilla way.

But, as you recall, every family has their groundlings, and the Capulets are no exception. The Capulet groundlings heard the rumours that Iago and his ilk were slinging, and they gnashed their teeth, and they pulled out their hair.

“YOU KILLED BRENDAN”, the groundings howled at the Mozilla booth.

“No, he left on his own accord to save us and the mission,” some Mozillians said with sadness.

“NO HE DIDN’T, HE WAS BETRAYED AND MURDERED BY HIS CLOSEST ALLIES!” the groundlings yelled back.

“No, that’s simply not true. He left on his own accord in an attempt to save the booth and the mission.”

And the reasonable Capulets understood this, and they understood the mindblowing complexities of this whole clusterfuck. And they spoke with reason and passion.

The Mozillian craftspeople got up from their work making jewelry to talk to these Capulets, and the supporters of the Capulets. And many were very reasonable and calm – but the groundlings among them were vicious and yelled and made so much noise. In some ways, their rage was indistinguishable from the Montegue groundling rage, which I believe is some kind of irony.

And, as you’d expect, the Capulet groundlings, like all groundlings, love blood. They love a fight. And they tore off their Firefox jewelry, and they stamped it into the ground. Vegetables and rotten fruit started to be thrown at the Mozilla booth. Again.

And the Mozillians in the booth looked at each other. They looked at the gaping void where Brendan used to stand. They all hugged one another, and comforted one another, as fruit and vegetables slammed into them and their works.

And this is where we currently are, I believe.

Epilogue

If these ramblings have offended,
Think but this, and all is mended,
That you have but slumber’d here
While these visions did appear.
And this weak and idle theme,
No more yielding but a dream,
Gentles, do not reprehend:
if you pardon, we will mend:
And, as I am an honest Mike,
I do yet miss this Brendan Eich.
Now to ‘scape the serpent’s tongue,
We will make amends ere long;
Else the Mike a liar call;
So, good night unto you all.
Give me your hands, if we be friends,
And Robin shall restore amends.

For a less silly and more sober analysis of what happened, I suggest reading this next.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Andrew Sutherland: webpd: a Polymer-based web UI for the beets music library manager

snein, 06/04/2014 - 18:56

beets webpd filtered artists list

beets is the extensible music database tool every programmer with a music collection has dreamed of writing.  At its simplest it’s a clever tagger that can normalize your music against the MusicBrainz database and then store the results in a searchable SQLite database.  But with plugins it can fetch album art, use the Discogs music database for tagging too, calculate ReplayGain values for all your music, integrate meta-data from The Echo Nest, etc.  It even has a Music Player Daemon server-mode (bpd) and a simple HTML interface (web) that lets you search for tracks and play them in your browse using the HTML5 audio tag.

I’ve tried a lot of music players through the years (alphabetically: amarok, banshee, exaile, quodlibetrhythmbox).  They all are great music players and (at least!) satisfy the traditional Artist/Album/Track hierarchy use-case, but when you exceed 20,000 tracks and you have a lot of compilation cd’s, that frequently ends up not being enough. Extending them usually turned out to be too hard / not fun enough, although sometimes it was just a question of time and seeking greener pastures.

But enough context; if you’re reading my blog you probably are on board with the web platform being the greatest platform ever.  The notable bits of the implementation are:

  • Server-wise, it’s a mash-up of beets’ MPD-alike plugin bpd and its web plugin.  Rather than needing to speak the MPD protocol over TCP to get your server to play music, you can just hit it with an HTTP POST and it will enqueue and play the song.  Server-sent events/EventSource are used to let the web UI hypothetically update as things happen on the server.  Right now the client can indeed tell the server to play a song and hear an update via the EventSource channel, but there’s almost certainly a resource leak on the server-side and there’s a lot more web/bpd interlinking required to get it reliable.  (Python’s Flask is neat, but I’m not yet clear on how to properly manage the life-cycle of a long-lived request that only dies when the connection dies since I’m seeing the appcontext get torn down even before the generator starts running.)
  • The client is implemented in Polymer on top of some simple backbone.js collections that build on the existing logic from the beets web plugin.
    • The artist list uses the polymer-virtual-list element which is important if you’re going to be scrolling through a ton of artists.  The implementation is page-based; you tell it how many pages you want and how many items are on each page.  As you scroll it fires events that compel you to generate the appropriate page.  It’s an interesting implementation:
      • Pages are allowed to be variable height and therefore their contents are too, although a fixedHeight mode is also supported.
      • In variable-height mode, scroll offsets are translated to page positions by guessing the page based on the height of the first page and then walking up/down from there based on cached page-sizes until the right page size is found.  If there is missing information because the user managed to trigger a huge jump, extrapolation is performed based on the average item size from the first page.
      • Any changes to the contents of the list regrettably require discarding all existing pages/bindings.  At this time there is no way to indicate a splice at a certain point that should simply result in a displacement of the existing items.
    • Albums are loaded in batches from the server and artists dynamically derived from them.  Although this would allow for the UI to update as things are retrieved, the virtual-list invalidation issue concerned me enough to have the artist-list defer initialization until all albums are loaded.  On my machine a couple thousand albums load pretty quickly, so this isn’t a huge deal.
    • There’s filtering by artist name and number of albums in the database by that artist built on backbone-filtered-collection.  The latter one is important to me because scrolling through hundreds of artists where I might only own one cd or not even one whole cd is annoying.  (Although the latter is somewhat addressed currently by only using the albumartist for the artist generation so various artists compilations don’t clutter things up.)
    • If you click on an artist it plays the first track (numerically) from the first album (alphabetically) associated with the artist.  This does limit the songs you can listen to somewhat…
    • visualizations are done using d3.js; one svg per visualization

beets webpd madonna and morrissey

“What’s with all those tastefully chosen colors?” is what you are probably asking yourself.  The answer?  Two things!

  1. A visualization of albums/releases in the database by time, heat-map style.
    • We bin all of the albums that beets knows about by year.  In this case we assume that 1980 is the first interesting year and so put 1979 and everything before it (including albums without a year) in the very first bin on the left.  The current year is the rightmost bucket.
    • We vertically divide the albums into “albums” (red), “singles” (green), and “compilations” (blue).  This is accomplished by taking the MusicBrainz Release Group / Types and mapping them down to our smaller space.
    • The more albums in a bin, the stronger the color.
  2. A scatter-plot using the echo nest‘s acoustic attributes for the tracks where:
    • the x-axis is “danceability”.  Things to the left are less danceable.  Things to the right are more danceable.
    • the y-axis is “valence” which they define as “the musical positiveness conveyed by a track”.  Things near the top are sadder, things near the bottom are happier.
    • the colors are based on the type of album the track is from.  The idea was that singles tend to have remixes on them, so it’s interesting if we always see a big cluster of green remixes to the right.
    • tracks without the relevant data all end up in the upper-left corner.  There are a lot of these.  The echo nest is extremely generous in allowing non-commercial use of their API, but they limit you to 20 requests per minute and at this point the beets echonest plugin needs to upload (transcoded) versions of all my tracks since my music collection is apparently more esoteric than what the servers already have fingerprints for.

Together these visualizations let us infer:

  • Madonna is more dancey than Morrissey!  Shocking, right?
  • I bought the Morrissey singles box sets. And I got ripped off because there’s a distinct lack of green dots over on the right side.

Code is currently in the webpd branch of my beets fork although I should probably try and split it out into a separate repo.  You need to enable the webpd plugin like you would any other plugin for it to work.  There’s still a lot lot lot more work to be done for it to be usable, but I think it’s neat already.  It definitely works in Firefox and Chrome.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Joshua Cranmer: Announcing jsmime 0.2

sn, 05/04/2014 - 19:18
Previously, I've been developing JSMime as a subdirectory within comm-central. However, after discussions with other developers, I have moved the official repository of record for JSMime to its own repository, now found on GitHub. The repository has been cleaned up and the feature set for version 0.2 has been selected, so that the current tip on JSMime (also the initial version) is version 0.2. This contains the feature set I imported into Thunderbird's source code last night, which is to say support for parsing MIME messages into the MIME tree, as well as support for parsing and encoding email address headers.

Thunderbird doesn't actually use the new code quite yet (as my current tree is stuck on a mozilla-central build error, so I haven't had time to run those patches through a last minute sanity check before requesting review), but the intent is to replace the current C++ implementations of nsIMsgHeaderParser and nsIMimeConverter with JSMime instead. Once those are done, I will be moving forward with my structured header plans which more or less ought to make those interfaces obsolete.

Within JSMime itself, the pieces which I will be working on next will be rounding out the implementation of header parsing and encoding support (I have prototypes for Date headers and the infernal RFC 2231 encoding that Content-Disposition needs), as well as support for building MIME messages from their constituent parts (a feature which would be greatly appreciated in the depths of compose and import in Thunderbird). I also want to implement full IDN and EAI support, but that's hampered by the lack of a JS implementation I can use for IDN (yes, there's punycode.js, but that doesn't do StringPrep). The important task of converting the MIME tree to a list of body parts and attachments is something I do want to work on as well, but I've vacillated on the implementation here several times and I'm not sure I've found one I like yet.

JSMime, as its name implies, tries to work in as pure JS as possible, augmented with several web APIs as necessary (such as TextDecoder for charset decoding). I'm using ES6 as the base here, because it gives me several features I consider invaluable for implementing JavaScript: Promises, Map, generators, let. This means it can run on an unprivileged web page—I test JSMime using Firefox nightlies and the Firefox debugger where necessary. Unfortunately, it only really works in Firefox at the moment because V8 doesn't support many ES6 features yet (such as destructuring, which is annoying but simple enough to work around, or Map iteration, which is completely necessary for the code). I'm not opposed to changing it to make it work on Node.js or Chrome, but I don't realistically have the time to spend doing it myself; if someone else has the time, please feel free to contact me or send patches.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Jonathan Protzenko: Freedom of speech in the Mozilla Community

sn, 05/04/2014 - 15:58

I read this morning Andrew Truong's blog on planet:

I guess it's okay to speak out about how we truly feel when somebody resigns over a controversial topic but not to speak out during the controversy? We should ALWAYS speak out. Freedom of Speech.

The reason why I didn't speak up is, just like many other Mozillians I suspect, for fear of retribution. Seeing the attacks perpetrated on Brendan, a well-respected member of the Mozilla community, I can only imagine the torrent of hatemail that I'm going to get for publishing this blog post. The other reason is, I didn't want to further encourage a debate which I hoped would fade off after a few days. I somehow hoped we could go back to "business as usual". We were unable to, and thus I see no reason to hold back this blog post anymore.

I live in Europe. We tend to have a different opinion on these matters. But in any case, before you go any further down, I should just mention that I do support the right for anyone to marry the one they love, and I voted according to that belief for the last few elections in my country. I am a straight person, though.

I'm going to quote a few blog posts that resonate with me, and add a few comments.

Daniel wrote:

Who said "Mozilla Community"? Who said Openness? Pfffff. I've been a Mozillian for fourteen years and I'm not even sure I still recognize myself in today's Mozilla Community. Well done guys, well done. What's the next step? 100% political correctness? Is it still possible to have a legally valid personal opinion while being at Mozilla and express it in public?

From private conversations I had with other (mostly European) Mozillians, I know for certain that people have opinions that they are afraid to express in the Mozilla Community. Some people are religious, and will take great care _not_ to reveal that fact. Some people may have other beliefs that do not align with the dominant, Silicon-Valley progressive ideology. They also make sure that these are not apparent. Andrew Truong mentions freedom of speech. I believe there is freedom of speech in the Mozilla community as long as you happen to have the right opinions.

In my personal case, I fortunately happen to side with the prevalent ideology for most points, but I am now very afraid of slipping and expressing an opinion that is not considered progressive enough. I am now afraid of what is going to happen to me then: will I be kicked out? Will people call out for my name being removed from about:credits? Will people call on Twitter for my being ousted from Mozillians.org?

Ben Moskowitz wrote:

For the record, I don’t believe Brendan Eich is a bigot. He’s stubborn, not hateful. He has an opinion. It’s certainly not my opinion, but it was the opinion of 52% of people who voted on Prop 8 just six years ago, and the world is changing fast.

Again, my European point of view on the matter is simple: I interact in my daily life with many people who do not support same-sex marriage. I'm pretty sure some bosses up my hierarchy do not support that. I believe that, ultimately, there will be less and less such people, and that society will change enough that being against same-sex marriage will be a thing of the past. I also believe that as long as my bosses do their jobs, I'm fine with that. I do not care about the personal life of my president; I just care for him to run the country according to the values that his party adheres to. Same thing goes for Brendan.

Christie, who in a much better position that I am to speak about that, says:

Certainly it would be problematic if Brendan’s behavior within Mozilla was explicitly discriminatory, or implicitly so in the form of repeated microagressions. I haven’t personally seen this (although to be clear, I was not part of Brendan’s reporting structure until today). To the contrary, over the years I have watched Brendan be an ally in many areas and bring clarity and leadership when needed. Furthermore, I trust the oversight Mozilla has in place in the form of our chairperson, Mitchell Baker, and our board of directors.

The way people demanded a public apology reminded me of the glorious times of Soviet Russia and Communist China. What next? Should Brendan be photoshopped out of all the pictures? If we leave the matter as is, the only reasonable thing left to do is to add an extra round of interviews when hiring people: the political interview. There, we should make sure that the people we hire share the "right" political opinion. Otherwise, it seems like they is no space for them in the Mozilla Community.

Andrew Sullivan wrote:

If this is the gay rights movement today – hounding our opponents with a fanaticism more like the religious right than anyone else – then count me out. If we are about intimidating the free speech of others, we are no better than the anti-gay bullies who came before us.

While being a strong supporter of the movement, I really feel sad today: what legitimacy is there now for people who've been dragging through the mud an opponent, instead of treating them like a decent, human being? Is this what Mozilla is about?

(Comments are disabled on this post.)

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet