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What the $33 Mozilla Firefox Phone Means for Emerging Markets - Motley Fool

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IBNLive

What the $33 Mozilla Firefox Phone Means for Emerging Markets
Motley Fool
Intex is one of two Indian companies, with Spice being the other, which have developed low-end smartphones through partnerships with Mozilla and Spreadtrum, a fabless chipmaker in China. Spice's upcoming Firefox phone, the Fire One Mi-FX, which ...
Indian Firefox OS phones start at $33LinuxGizmos
Spice Fire One Mi-X1 First Look: Looks like Android But Has Got New FeaturesGizbot
Spice rolls out Firefox OS-powered Spice Fire One? What's on offer?Light Reading India
Hindustan Times -Siliconindia.com -IT News Online
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Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla Begins Testing Ads on Firefox Nightly - Sci-Tech Today

Nieuws verzameld via Google - snein, 31/08/2014 - 09:00

Mozilla Begins Testing Ads on Firefox Nightly
Sci-Tech Today
Sponsored ads have begun appearing among the suggested Web site boxes that show up when Firefox Nightly users open new browser tabs. Firefox Nightly is the nightly-updated, in-development version of Mozilla's browser for “extremely technical early ...

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Pascal Finette: Robots are eating our jobs

Mozilla planet - snein, 31/08/2014 - 04:12

Shahin Farshchi wrote a piece for IEEE Spectrum, the flagship magazine of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, on “Five Myths and Facts About Robotics Technology Today”.

In the article he states:

Robots are intended to eliminate jobs: MYTH – Almost every major manufacturing and logistics company I’ve spoken to looks to robotics as a means to improve the efficiency of its operations and the quality of life of its existing workers. So human workers continue to be a key part of the business when it comes to robotics. In fact, workers should view robots as how skilled craftsmen view their precision tools: enhancing output while creating greater job satisfaction. Tesla Motors is just one example of using robots [pictured above] to do all the limb-threatening and back-breaking tasks while workers oversee their operation and ensure the quality of their output. At Tesla’s assembly lines, robots glue, rivet, and weld parts together, under the watchful eye of humans. These workers can pride themselves with being part of a new era in manufacturing where robots help to reinvent and reinvigorate existing industries like the automotive sector.”

I disagree.

It is well documented that robots eliminate jobs (heck - that’s what they are for amongst other things). Shahin even shows a picture from Tesla’s highly automated factory depicting a fully automated production line without a single human around. Stating that robots are not replacing jobs but that the few remaining workers “can pride themselves with being part of a new era in manufacturing where robots help to reinvent and reinvigorate existing industries like the automotive sector” really doesn’t cut it.

Robots and automation is destroying jobs, especially at the lower end of the spectrum. At the same time we are not creating enough new jobs - which already leads to massive challenges to our established systems and will only get worse over time.

I suggest you watch this:

In my opinion what’s needed, is us collectively acknowledging the issues at hand and start a productive dialog. The 2013 World Development Report states that we need to create 600 million new jobs globally in the next 15 years to sustain current employment rates – and this doesn’t take into account potential massive job losses due to automation and robots.

We need to start working on this. Now.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Kevin Ngo: Testing Project Browserify Modules in Karma Test Runner with Gulp

Mozilla planet - snein, 31/08/2014 - 02:00

If you want to test local Browserify modules in your project with Karma, you'll have to take an extra step. One solution is to use karma-browserify that bundles your modules with your tests, but it has downfalls requiring files that require other files. That really sucks since we'll often be unit testing local modules that depend on at least one other module, and thus it'd only be useful for like requiring simple NPM modules.

Another solution uses Gulp to manually build a test bundle and put it on the project JS root path such that local modules can be resolved.

Here is the Gulp task in our gulpfile.js:

var browserify = require('browserify'); var glob = require('glob'); // You'll have to install this too. gulp.task('tests', function() { // Bundle a test JS bundle and put it on our project JS root path. var testFiles = glob.sync('./tests/**/*.js'); // Bundle all our tests. return browserify(testFiles).bundle({debug: true}) .pipe(source('tests.js')) // The bundle name. .pipe(gulp.dest('./www/js')); // The JS root path. });

A test bundle, containing all our test files, will be spit out on our JS root path. Now when we do require('myAppFolder/someJSFile'), Browserify will easily be able to find the module.

But we also have to tell Karma where our new test bundle is. Do so in our karma.config.js file:

files: [ {pattern: 'www/js/tests.js', included: true} ]

We'll also want to tell Gulp to re-bundle our tests every time the tests are touched. This can be annoying if you have Gulp set up to watch your JS path, since the tests will spit out a bundle on the JS path

gulp.watch('./tests/**/*.js', ['tests']);

Run your tests and try requiring one of your project files. It should work!

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Patrick Cloke: Adding an Auxiliary Audio Input to a 2005 Subaru Outback

Mozilla planet - sn, 30/08/2014 - 23:34

I own a 2005 (fourth generation) Subaru Outback, I’ve had it since the fall of 2006 and it has been great. I have a little over 100,000 miles and do not plan to sell it anytime soon.

There is one thing that just kills me though. You cannot (easily [1]) change the radio in it…and it is just old enough [2] to have neigher BlueTooth nor an auxiliary audio input. I’ve been carrying around a book of CDs with me for the past 8 years. I decided it was time to change that.

I knew that it was possible to "modify" the radio to accept an auxiliary input, but it involved always playing a silent CD, which I did not find adequate. I recently came across a post of how to do this in such a way that the radio functions as normal, but when you plug in a device to the auxiliary port it cuts out the radio and plays from the device. Someone else had also confirmed that it worked for them. Cool!

I vaguely followed the directions, but made a few changes here and there. Also, everyone online seems to make it seem like the radio is super easy to get out…I seriously think I spent at least two hours on it. There were two videos and a PDF I found useful for this task.

Front view of my uninstalled 2005 Subaru Outback stereo. Right view of my uninstalled 2005 Subaru Outback stereo. Back view of my uninstalled 2005 Subaru Outback stereo.

A few images of the uninstalled stereo before any disassembly. (So I could remember how to reassemble it!)

I wouldn’t say that this modification was extremely difficult, but it does involve:

  • Soldering to surface mount components (I’m not awesome a soldering, but I have had a good amount of experience).
  • The willingness to potentially trash a radio.
  • Basic understanding of electrical diagrams and how switches work.
  • A lot of time! I spent ~13 hours total working on this.

Total cost of components, however, was < $5.00 (and that’s probably overestimating.) Really the only component I didn’t have was the switching audio jack, which I got at my local RadioShack for $2.99. (I also picked up wire, heatshrink, etc. so…$5.00 sounded reasonable.) The actual list of parts and tools I used was:

  • 1/8" Stereo Panel-Mount Phone Jack [$2.99, RadioShack #274-246]
  • ~2 feet of each of green and red 22 gauge wire, ~1 foot of black 22 gauge wire.
  • Soldering iron / Solder
  • 3 x Alligator clip testing wires (1 black, 1 red, 1 green)
  • Multimeter
  • Hot glue gun / Hot glue
  • Various sizes of flat/slotted and Phillips head screw drivers
  • Wire strippers
  • Wire cutter
  • Needle nosed pliers
  • Flashlight
  • Drill with 1/4" drill bit and a 1/2" spade bit (plus some smaller sized drill bits for pilot holes)

Anyway, once you have the radio out you can disassembly it down to it’s bare components. (It is held together with a bunch of screws and tabs, I took pictures along each step of the way to ensure I could put it back together.)

The front of the stereo after removing the control unit. The reverse of the control unit. The top of the unit with the cover removed showing the CD drive.

The initial steps of disassembly: the front after removing the controls, the reverse of the control unit, a top-down view after removing the top of the unit [3].

The main circuit board of the unit. The reverse of the mian circuit board of the unit.

The actual circuit board of the stereo unit. You can see the radio module on the left.

The radio module connects to the motherboard with a 36-pin connector. Pin 31 is the right audio channel and pin 32 is left audio channel. I verified this by connected the disassembly radio to the car and testing with alligator clips hooked up to my phones audio output [4]. I already knew these were the pins from the directions, but I verified by completing the circuit to these pins and ensuring I heard mixed audio with my phone and the radio.

The direction suggested cutting the pin and bending it up to solder to it. I didn’t have any cutting tool small enough to get inbetween the pins…so I flipped the board over and did sketchier things. I scored the board to remove the traces [5] that connected the radio module to the rest of the board. I then soldered on either side of this connection to put it through the audo connector.

Soldered leads to the bottom of the stereo board. Soldered ground to the top of the radio unit.

Five soldered connections are required, four to the bottom of the board [6] and one to the ground at the top of the unit.

Now, the way that this works is that the audio connector output (pins 2 and 5) is always connected. If nothing is in the jack, it is connected as a passthrough to the inputs (pins 3 and 4, respectively). If an audio connector is plugged in, input redirects to the jack. (Pin 1 is ground.) For reference, red is right audio and green is left audio (black is ground).

Wiring diagrams of the connections.

A few of the diagrams necessary to do this. The top two diagram is simple the connectors two states: no plug and plug. The bottom two diagrams are a normal 1/8" audio plug and the physical pin-out and measurements of the jack.

To reiterate, pins 2 and 5 connect to the "stereo side" of the scored pins 31 and 32 of the radio module. (I.e. They are the output from the connector back to what will be played by the stereo.) Pins 3 and 4 are the inputs from the radio module side of pins 31 and 32 to the connector.

So after soldering for connections (and some hot glue), we have the ability to intercept the signal. At this point I took the bare motherboard and tested this in my car with alligator clips to ensure the radio still worked, I then connected the alligator clips to a cut audio plug to ensure everything worked.

Hot glued wires to the board as strain relief. Testing with alligator clips. (after reassmbly).

The wires were also hot glued to the circuit board as strain relief. After reassembly I tested again with alligator clips.

At this point, I reassembled the radio case and ran the wires out through holes in the side / bottom toward the front of the unit. I noticed there was an empty spot in the top left of the unit which looked like it would fit the panel mount audio jack. After doing some measurements I deemed my chances good enough to drill a hole here for the connector. Some tips on drilling plastic, if you haven’t done it much: use the lowest speed you can; start with very small bits and work your way up (I used 4 stages of bits); and cover both sides in masking tape to avoid scratches.

Taped and measurements for drilling the hole from the front. Taped and measurements for drilling the hole from the reverse.

Another benefit of tape is you can write anywhere you want. These measurements were taken initially on the back and transcribed to the front (where I drilled from).

The plastic was actually too think for the panel mount connector to reach through, which is where the 1/2" spade bit came in handy. I use it to drill through roughly half the thickness of the plastic (a little at a time with lots of testing). The connector was able to nestle inside the thinner plastic and reach all the way through.

The 1/4" hole drilled through the plastic. The thinning of the plastic from the 1/2" spade bit. The assembled connector in the hole

After the initial hole was drilled, the tape on the back was removed to thin the plastic.

The last bit was soldering the five connections onto the audio connector, applying a coating of hot glue (for strain relief and to avoid shorts). Once the connector was soldered, the front panel was carefully reassembled. Finally, the completed unit was reinstalled back into the car and voila, I now have an auxiliary audio input! Can’t wait to test it out on a long car trip.

The soldered jack. The hot-glued jack.

The soldered and hot-glued audio jack.

The installed unit. Close-up of the new jack.

The final installed stereo unit.

One caveat of doing this (and I’m unsure if this is because I didn’t cut the pins as suggested or if this is just a fact of doing it this way…). If you have an auxiliary input device playing AND play a CD, the audio mixes instead of being replaced by the auxiliary device. It works fine on radio though, so just remember to set the stereo to FM.

[1]The head unit of the stereo is directly built into the dashboard and includes the heat / air conditioning controls. People do sell kits to convert the dash into one that can accept an aftermarket radio…but where’s the fun in that? [2]The 2007 edition had an option for a stereo with satelite radio and an AUX input. I probably could have bought this stereo and installed it, but I was quoted $285 last time I asked about changing my radio. [3]This might seem insane, but I was fairly certain I’d be able to solder a jumper back into place if everything didn’t work, so I actually felt more comfortable doing this than cutting the pin. [4]Playing one of my favorite albums: No Control by Bad Religion [5]You can see I actually had a CD in the CD player when I removed the radio. Oops! Luckily it was just a copy of one of my CDs (I never take originals in my car). I didn’t end up scratching it or anything either! [6]Please don’t judge my soldering! Two of the four connections were a little sloppy (I had to add solder to those instead of just tinning the wires). I did ensure there were no shorts with a multimeter (and had to resolder one connection).
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla Improving Security Processes After Exposing Developer Data - eWeek

Nieuws verzameld via Google - sn, 30/08/2014 - 17:56

eWeek

Mozilla Improving Security Processes After Exposing Developer Data
eWeek
The most recent incident was first reported by Mozilla on Aug. 27 and involves information disclosure on 97,000 developers. The landfill.bugzilla.org development system for the Bugzilla bug tracking platform left developer information, including email ...
Mozilla loses more user info, this time data of 97000 customers goes out ...BetaNews
97000 Bugzilla email addresses and passwords exposed in another Mozilla leakNaked Security
Another 97000 Accounts Leaked from Mozilla DevVPN Creative
ITworld.com
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Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Chris McAvoy: Open Badges and JSON-LD

Mozilla planet - sn, 30/08/2014 - 13:34

The BA standard working group has had adding extensions to the OB assertion specification high on its roadmap this summer. We agreed that before we could add an extension to an assertion or Badge Class, we needed to add machine readable schema definitions for the 1.0 standard.

We experimented with JSON-Schema, then JSON-LD. JSON-LD isn’t a schema validator, it’s much more. It builds linked data semantics on the JSON specification. JSON-LD adds several key features to JSON, most of which you can play around with in the JSON-LD node module.

  1. Add semantic data to a JSON structure, link the serialized object to an object type definition.
  2. Extend the object by linking to multiple object type definitions.
  3. A standard way to flatten and compress the data.
  4. Express the object in RDF.
  5. Treat the objects like a weighted graph.

All of which are features that support the concept behind the Open Badges standard very well. At its core, the OB standard is a way for one party (the issuer) to assert facts about another party (the earner). The assertion (the badge) becomes portable and displayable at the discretion of the owner of the badge.

JSON-LD is also quickly becoming the standard method of including semantic markup on html pages for large indexers like Google. Schema.org now lists JSON-LD examples alongside RDFa and Microdata. Google recommends using JSON-LD for inclusion in their rich snippet listings.

We’ve been talking about JSON-LD on the OB standard working group calls for a while now. It’s starting to feel like consensus is forming around inclusion of JSON-LD markup in the standard. This Tuesday, September 2nd 2014, we’ll meet again to collectively build a list of arguments for and against the move. We’ll also discuss a conditional rollout plan (conditional in that it will only be executed if we get the thumbs up from the community) and identify any gaps we need to cover with commitments from the community.

It’s going to be a great meeting, if you’re at all interested in JSON-LD and Open Badges, please join us!

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Intex-Mozilla's price play may get buyers, but may fail to retain them - Business Standard

Nieuws verzameld via Google - sn, 30/08/2014 - 12:19

Business Standard

Intex-Mozilla's price play may get buyers, but may fail to retain them
Business Standard
Mozilla's aim to keep the device cost at $25 led to compromises on certain hardware specifications. It did manage to keep development cost much below that, but the retail price of the world's cheapest smartphone came to about $33 (Rs 1,999) by Intex, ...
Mozilla plans permission toggles in Firefox OSCNET
Mozilla announces $36 Intex Cloud FX smartphone for IndiaCBC.ca
This Is The $33 Smartphone For India That Could Ruin Samsung's Android ...Business Insider
Financialbuzz.com -Economic Times -New York Daily News
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Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Doug Belshaw: Weeknote 35/2014

Mozilla planet - sn, 30/08/2014 - 08:26

This week I’ve been:

  • Surviving while being home alone. The rest of my family flew down to Devon (it’s quicker/easier than driving) to visit the in-laws.
  • Working on lots of stuff around the house. There are no plants left in my garden, for example. We decided that we want to start from ‘ground zero’ so I went on a bit of a mission.
  • Suffering after launching myself into the week too hard. I’d done half of the things I wanted to do all week by Tuesday morning. By Wednesday I was a bit burnt out.
  • Writing blog posts:
  • Accepting an invitation to join Code Club’s education advisory committee.
  • Finding out about an opportunity to work with a well-known university in the US to design a module for their Ed.D. programme. More on that soon, hopefully!
  • Clearing out the Webmaker badges queue (with some assistance from my amazing colleagues)
  • Inviting some people to talk to me about the current Web Literacy Map and how we can go about updating it to a version 2.0.
  • Finishing and sending the rough draft of a video for a badge which will be available on the iDEA award website when it launches properly.
  • Starting to lift weights at the gym. I actually started last week, but I’ve already noticed it help my swimming this week. Improved stamina, and the bottom of my right hamstring doesn’t hurt when I get out of the pool!

Next week I’m at home with a fuller calendar than usual. That’s because I’m talking to lots of people about future directions for the Web Literacy Map. If you’ve started using it, then I’d love to interview you. Sign up for that here.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Eric Shepherd: The Sheppy Report: August 29, 2014

Mozilla planet - sn, 30/08/2014 - 04:38

This week, my WebRTC research continued; I spent a lot of time watching videos of presentations, pausing every few seconds to take notes, and rewinding often to be sure I got things right. It was interesting but very, very time-consuming!

I got a lot accomplished this week, although not any actual code on samples like I’d planned to. However, the pages on which the smaller samples will go are starting to come together, between bits of actual content on MDN and my extensive notes and outline. So that’s good.

I’m looking forward to this three-day Labor Day holiday here in the States. I’ll be back at it on Tuesday!

What I did this week?
  • Copy-edited the Validator glossary entry.
  • Copy-edited and cleaned up the Learning area page Write a simple page in HTML.
  • Created an initial stub documentation project plan page for updating the HTML element interface reference docs.
  • Turned https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Project:About into a redirect to the right place.
  • Read a great deal about WebRTC.
  • Watched many videos about WebRTC, pausing a lot to take copious notes.
  • Built an outline of all the topics I want to be sure to cover. I’m sure this will continue to grow for a while yet.
  • Gathered notes and built agendas for the MDN community meeting and the Web APIs documentation meeting.
  • Updated the WebRTC doc plan with new information based on my initial notes.
  • Offered more input on a bug recommending that we try to add code to prevent people from using the style attribute or any undefined classes.
  • Filed bug 1060395 asking for a way to find the pages describing the individual methods and properties of an interface in the Web API reference
  • Fixed bug 1058814 about hard-to-read buttons by correcting the styles used by a macro.
  • Dealt with expense reports.
  • Started very initial work on WebRTC doc tree construction, preparing to reshuffle and clean up the existing, somewhat old, pages, and to add lots of new stuff.
  • Started work on trying to figure out how to make the SubpageMenuByCategories macro not lose headers; it’s calling through to MakeColumnsForDL, which specifically only works for a straight-up <dl>. Fixing this to work correctly will be my first task on Tuesday.
Meetings attended this week Monday
  • MDN bug triage meeting
  • #mdndev planning meeting
Tuesday
  • Developer Relations weekly meeting.
  • 1:1 with Teoli. This went on for an hour instead of the usual 30 minutes, due to the enormous amount of Big Stuff we discussed.
Wednesday
  • MDN community meeting
Friday

A pretty good week all in all!

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla loses more user info, this time data of 97000 customers goes out ... - BetaNews

Nieuws verzameld via Google - sn, 30/08/2014 - 03:20

Naked Security

Mozilla loses more user info, this time data of 97000 customers goes out ...
BetaNews
It's been a bad month for Mozilla, as the company seems to be shedding user data left and right. The problems are apparently not over as new information has come to light regarding the loss of another 97,000 emails and passwords that were left exposed.
97000 Bugzilla email addresses and passwords exposed in another Mozilla leakNaked Security
Another 97000 Accounts Leaked from Mozilla DevVPN Creative
Mozilla reports user data leak from Bugzilla projectPC World Magazine

alle 16 nieuwsartikelen »
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla loses more user info, this time data of 97000 customers goes out ... - BetaNews

Nieuws verzameld via Google - sn, 30/08/2014 - 03:20

Naked Security

Mozilla loses more user info, this time data of 97000 customers goes out ...
BetaNews
It's been a bad month for Mozilla, as the company seems to be shedding user data left and right. The problems are apparently not over as new information has come to light regarding the loss of another 97,000 emails and passwords that were left exposed.
97000 Bugzilla email addresses and passwords exposed in another Mozilla leakNaked Security
Mozilla reports user data leak from Bugzilla projectPC World Magazine

alle 16 nieuwsartikelen »
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Benoit Girard: Visual warning for slow B2G transaction landed

Mozilla planet - fr, 29/08/2014 - 20:22

With the landing of bug 1055050, if you turn on the FPS counter on mobile you will now notice a rectangle around the screen edge to warning you that a transaction was out of budget.

  • The visual warning will appear if a transaction took over 200ms from start to finish.
  • Yellow indicates the transaction took over 200ms.
  • Orange will indicate the transaction took about 500ms.
  • Red will indicate the transaction is about 1000ms or over.

What’s a transaction?

It’s running the rendering pipeline and includes (1) Running request animation frame and other refresh observers, (2) Flushing pending style changes, (3) Flushing and reflow any pending layout changes, (4) Building a display list, (5) Culling, (6) Updating the layer tree, (7) Sending the final to the compositor, (8) Syncing resources with the GPU. It does NOT include compositing which isn’t part of the main thread transaction. It does not warn for other events like slow running JS events.

Why is this important?

A transaction, just like any other gecko event, blocks the main thread. This means that anything else queued and waiting to be service will be delayed. This means that many things on the page/app will be delayed like: animations, typing, canvas, js callbacks, timers, the next frame.

Why 200ms?

200ms is already very high. If we want anything in the app to run at 60 FPS that doesn’t use a magical async path then any event taking 16ms or more will cause noticeable stutter. However we’re starting with a 200ms threshold to focus on the bigger items first.

How do I fix a visual warning?

The warning as just provided as a visual tool.


Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla to Support Key Pinning in Firefox 32 - Threatpost

Nieuws verzameld via Google - fr, 29/08/2014 - 18:14

StreetWise Tech

Mozilla to Support Key Pinning in Firefox 32
Threatpost
Mozilla is planning to add support for public-key pinning in its Firefox browser in an upcoming version. In version 32, which would be the next stable version of the browser, Firefox will have key pins for a long list of sites, including many of ...
Review: Google Chrome is still Rated one of the Best Web BrowsersStreetWise Tech

alle 4 nieuwsartikelen »
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Priyanka Nag: Maker Party Bhubaneshwar

Mozilla planet - fr, 29/08/2014 - 18:09
Last weekend I had a blast in Bhubaneshwar. Over two days, I was there at two different colleges for two Maker parties.

Saturday (23rd August 2014), we were at the Center of IT & Management Education (CIME) where we were asked to address a crowd of 100 participants whom we were supposed to teach webmaking. Trust me, very rarely do we get such crowd in events where we get the opportunity to be less of a teacher and more of a learner. We taught them Webmaking, true, but in return we learnt a lot from them.

Maker Party at Center of IT & Management Education (CIME)
On Sunday, things were even more fabulous at Institute of Technical Education & Research(ITER), Siksha 'O' Anusandhan University college, where we were welcomed by around 400 participants, all filled with energy, enthusiasm and the willingness to learn.

Maker Party at Institute of Technical Education & Research(ITER)
Our agenda for both days were simple....to have loads and loads of fun! We kept the tracks interactive and very open ended. On both days, we did cover the following topics:
  • Introduction to Mozilla
  • Mozilla Products and projects
  • Ways of contributing to Mozilla
  • Intro to Webmaker tools
  • Hands-on session on Thimble, Popcorn and X-ray goggles and Appmaker
Both days, we concluded our sessions by giving away some small tokens of appreciation like e T-shirts, badges, stickers etc, to the people who had been extra awesome among the group. We concluded the awesomeness of the two days by cutting a very delicious cake and fighting over it till its last pieces. Cake.....Bading goodbye after two days was tough, but after witnessing the enthusiasm of everyone we met during these two events, I am very sure we are going to return soon to Bhubaneshwar for even more awesomeness. A few people who are two be thanked for making these events sucessful and very memorable are:
  1. Sayak Sarkar, the co-organizer for this event.
  2. Sumantro, Umesh and Sukanta from travelling all the way from Kolkata and helping us out with the sessions.
  3. Rish and Prasanna for organizing these events.
  4. Most importantly, the entire team of volunteers from both colleges without whom we wouldn't havebeen able to even move a desk.
 p.s - Not to forget, we did manage to grab media's attention as well. The event was covered by a local newspaper.The article in the newspaper next morning
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Pascal Finette: Follow Your Fears

Mozilla planet - fr, 29/08/2014 - 17:01

Building trophies in my soul…

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

97000 Bugzilla email addresses and passwords exposed in another Mozilla leak - Naked Security

Nieuws verzameld via Google - fr, 29/08/2014 - 16:32

97000 Bugzilla email addresses and passwords exposed in another Mozilla leak
Naked Security
The accidental exposure is the second disclosed by the Mozilla Foundation this month - on 1 August, the organisation revealed that around 76,000 Mozilla Developer Network email addresses and 4,000 hashed and salted passwords had been left on a ...
Mozilla reports user data leak from Bugzilla projectPC World Magazine
Mozilla, Again, Accidentally Hacks its DevelopersNextgov

alle 15 nieuwsartikelen »
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Daniel Stenberg: Firefox OS Flatfish Bluedroid fix

Mozilla planet - fr, 29/08/2014 - 14:11

Hey, when I just built my own Firefox OS (b2g) image for my Firefox OS Tablet (flatfish) I ran into this (known) problem:

Can't find necessary file(s) of Bluedroid in the backup-flatfish folder. Please update the system image for supporting Bluedroid (Bug-986314), so that the needed binary files can be extracted from your flatfish device.

So, as I struggled to figure out the exact instructions on how to proceed from this, I figured I should jot down what I did in the hopes that it perhaps will help a fellow hacker at some point:

  1. Download the 3 *.img files from the dropbox site that is referenced from bug 986314.
  2. Download the flash-flatfish.sh script from the same dropbox place
  3. Make sure you have ‘fastboot’ installed (I’m mentioning this here because it turned out I didn’t and yet I have already built and flashed my Flame phone successfully without having it). “apt-get install android-tools-fastboot” solved it for me. Note that if it isn’t installed, the flash-flatfish.sh script will claim that the device is not in fastboot mode and stop with an error message saying so.
  4. Finally: run the script “./flash-flatfish.sh [dir with the 3 .img files]“
  5. Once it had succeeded, the tablet reboots
  6. Remove the backup-flatfish directory in the build dir.
  7. Restart the flatfish build again and now it should get passed that Bluedroid nit

Enjoy!

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla presses forward with new revenue plan, debuts ads in Firefox preview - Computerworld

Nieuws verzameld via Google - fr, 29/08/2014 - 13:13

VentureBeat

Mozilla presses forward with new revenue plan, debuts ads in Firefox preview
Computerworld
The ads, which Mozilla's calls "sponsored tiles," were first discussed by Mozilla in February, but the initiative was criticized by Firefox users. The company, however, defended the in-browser ad project, saying it was important to find other revenue ...
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightliesRegister
Mozilla rolls out sponsored tiles to Firefox NightlyThe Next Web
Mozilla Introduces Sponsored Tiles on Firefox NightlyClickZ
VentureBeat -Engadget
alle 15 nieuwsartikelen »
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla presses forward with new revenue plan, debuts ads in Firefox preview - Computerworld

Nieuws verzameld via Google - fr, 29/08/2014 - 13:13

VentureBeat

Mozilla presses forward with new revenue plan, debuts ads in Firefox preview
Computerworld
The ads, which Mozilla's calls "sponsored tiles," were first discussed by Mozilla in February, but the initiative was criticized by Firefox users. The company, however, defended the in-browser ad project, saying it was important to find other revenue ...
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightliesRegister
Mozilla rolls out sponsored tiles to Firefox NightlyThe Next Web
Mozilla Introduces Sponsored Tiles on Firefox NightlyClickZ
VentureBeat -Engadget
alle 13 nieuwsartikelen »
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

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