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Firefox 39 checkt Mac- en Linux-downloads op malware - Security.nl

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Firefox 39 checkt Mac- en Linux-downloads op malware
Security.nl
Mozilla heeft een nieuwe versie van Firefox uitgebracht, waarin 22 beveiligingslekken zijn verholpen, waaronder de Logjam-aanval. Daarnaast worden voortaan downloads van Mac- en Linux-gebruikers op malware gecontroleerd. Van de 22 ...

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Mozilla: Firefox 39 schmeißt alte Krypto raus - Golem.de

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Golem.de

Mozilla: Firefox 39 schmeißt alte Krypto raus
Golem.de
... gilt damit zwar als abgeschafft, verschiedene Anwendungen müssen dies jedoch erst noch umsetzen. Mit der aktuellen Version 39 des Firefox kommt Mozilla der Weisung der IETF nach und entfernt die Unterstützung für SSLv3 komplett aus dem Browser.
Firefox 39 veröffentlichtPro-Linux

alle 2 nieuwsartikelen »
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla accidentally exposes the T-shirt sizes of its developers - BetaNews

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BetaNews

Mozilla accidentally exposes the T-shirt sizes of its developers
BetaNews
In mid-March, Mozilla had a contest, where it asked developers to come up with a t-shirt design. In mid-June, a winner was chosen and the developers were invited to reserve a t-shirt online using Google Form. Unfortunately, someone at Mozilla pulled a ...

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

New Sharing Features in Firefox

Mozilla Blog - to, 02/07/2015 - 22:58

Whichever social network you choose, it’s undeniable that being social is a key part of why you enjoy the Web. Firefox is built to put you in control, including making it easier to share anything you like on the Web’s most popular social networks. Today, we’re announcing that Firefox Share has been integrated into Firefox Hello. We introduced Firefox Share to offer a simple way of sharing Web content across popular services such as Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, LinkedIn and Google+ and other social and email services  (full list here) to help you share anything on the Web with any or all of your friends.

Firefox Hello link sharing

Firefox Hello, which we’ve been developing in beta with our partner, Telefonica, is the only in-browser video chat tool that doesn’t require an account or extra software downloads. We recently added screen sharing to Firefox Hello to make it easier to share anything you’re looking at in your video call. Now you can also invite friends to a Firefox Hello video call by sharing a link via the social network or email account of your choice, all without leaving your browser tab. That includes a newly added Yahoo Mail integration in Firefox Share that lets Yahoo Mail users share Hello conversation links or other Web content directly from Firefox Share.

For more information:
Release Notes for Firefox for Windows, Mac, Linux
Release Notes for Android
Download Firefox

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Rust Never Sleeps: How Mozilla Could Become Cool Again - ReadWrite

Nieuws verzameld via Google - to, 02/07/2015 - 21:04

ReadWrite

Rust Never Sleeps: How Mozilla Could Become Cool Again
ReadWrite
Once it offered a serious competitive threat to Microsoft's Internet Explorer. Today, Mozilla's Firefox squeaks into third place with just 12% market share of desktop browsers, according to NetMarketShare, and is worse than a rounding error among ...

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla Games Technology Roadmap

Mozilla Futurereleases - to, 02/07/2015 - 20:30

In furthering the advantages and appeal of the Web as a platform for games and game technologies, Mozilla is publishing its games-focused roadmap. In short, it’s all about high-performance, plugin-free games on the Web. We have made incredible progress over the last few years; to continue this trend, Mozilla has been working with game developers and tool makers to identify additional enhancements that will further empower the community. The following roadmap outlines both the feedback we received and the solutions we are currently pursuing in response to this feedback. This roadmap may be subject to change.

With the unveiling of WebAssembly, browsers have taken another common step towards native levels of performance on the Web. This roadmap outlines the wider view of additional Web platform functionality needed to allow game developers to provide the best possible experiences. Games are often a great catalyst for driving technology forward due to their demanding nature. To maximize the benefit to the Web, care has been taken to ensure that solutions will benefit the widest possible range of applications.

There are two levels to this document. The first is the Roadmap section which contains areas that are currently in development and we have a reasonable level of confidence we can address in the next year. The second is the Under Consideration section which contains topics that are under active investigation.

Roadmap

  • Allow developers to better exploit hardware parallelism.
    • Developers are struggling to get multi-threaded games running efficiently on the Web:
      • Standardize, implement and ship SharedArrayBuffer [1,2].
      • Add pthreads support to Emscripten [1,2].
      • Expose performance-sensitive Web APIs to Web Workers: WebGL, WebSockets, IndexedDB, WebAudio, WebRTC, WebVR.
      • Share compiled code (asm.js and WebAssembly) between workers [1].
    • Developers want to take advantage of SIMD hardware to optimize their code:
      • Standardize, implement and ship SIMD.js [1,2].
      • Include SIMD in WebAssembly [1].
      • Add SIMD support to Emscripten [1].
  • Improve cold load time of large compiled codebases.
    • Developers want to see reduced download, compilation and startup time for multi-million line compiled codebases.
      • WebAssembly will provide significant download size reductions (even before native support, through the polyfill) [1].
      • Natively decoding WebAssembly will be significantly faster than parsing JavaScript/asm.js [1].
      • Add a fast WebAssembly/asm.js compiler that allows an app to start quickly while a fully-optimizing compilation proceeds in a background thread [1].
      • Off-main-thread, streaming parsing/compilation [1].
    • Developers want to avoid depending on HTTP Content-Encoding:gzip for generic compression.
      • Add Emscripten support to perform decompression in asm.js / WebAssembly while downloading (allowing more aggressive algorithms than gzip).
  • Improve browser storage capabilities.
    • Developers seeking to avoid the permission prompt associated with persistent storage hit limitations of temporary storage as currently implemented in browsers.
      • Improve temporary quota limits to take into account factors like frecency.
      • Provide more information on quota usage and allowance [1].
      • Propose, standardize and implement finer-granularity units of evictable storage [1].
      • Allow cross-origin storage usage [1].
    • Developers that need persistent storage guarantees hit limitations of persistent storage as currently implemented in browsers.
      • Standardize persistent storage so that other browsers implement [1].
      • Reduce UI friction associated with the persistent permission prompt [1].
      • Improve storage management/eviction UI for browser users.
  • Improve browser graphics capabilities.
    • Ship WebGL2 [1].
    • Standardize and implement streaming WebGL canvas via WebRTC [1,2].
    • Run WebGL on discrete hardware for systems with integrated+discrete (e.g. nVidia Optimus).
  • Allow developers to better avoid 32-bit browser Out-of-Memory conditions.
    • Ship 64-bit Firefox on 64-bit Windows.
    • Avoid Emscripten in-memory Virtual File System for asset storage by leveraging pthreads and FileReaderSync to provide synchronous file I/O in workers.
  • Continue investment in performance across the platform.
    • Significantly optimize WebAudio performance [1].
    • Reduce WebGL shader compile times [1,2].
    • Reduce latency and jitter in the browser’s rendering pipeline [1,2,3,4].
    • Continue investments in the performance of JS, DOM, WebGL, WebRTC, codec, layout, rendering, compositing, animation, etc.
  • Continue investment in Emscripten.
    • Add support for pthreads, SIMD, and WebAssembly, as mentioned above.
    • Further improve compilation speed.
  • Continue investment in Firefox developer tooling to better support game developers.
    • Improve Web Worker support [1].
    • Allow developers to break on various asm.js/WebAssembly error conditions [1].

Under Consideration

  • Developers are having trouble identifying how many Web Workers they should create to distribute their workload. Benchmarking methods often prove unreliable.
  • Developers are hitting the 20-per-origin limit on web workers in Firefox and are requesting a much higher limit.
  • Leverage multi-process browser architecture to guarantee a fresh address space for games with large contiguous heaps allocated early in process startup.
  • Investigate Out-of-Memory error reporting mechanism to send safe/sanitized triage information back to Web app developers.
  • Collaborate on new standards to improve IME capabilities [1,2].
  • Add hardware cursor API [1].
  • Improve Gamepad API [1].
  • Add Pointer Clipping extension to Pointer Lock API [1].
  • Add Emscripten tooling for memory use/leak debugging.
  • Standardize (as part of WebAssembly or more generally) a more scalable form of source maps suitable for large compiled codes.
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Byron Jones: happy bmo push day!

Mozilla planet - to, 02/07/2015 - 07:59

the following changes have been pushed to bugzilla.mozilla.org:

  • [1174057] Authentication Delegation should add an App ID column to associate api keys with specific callbacks
  • [1163761] Allow MozReview to skip user consent screen for Authentication Delegation
  • [825946] tracking flags should be cleared when a bug is moved to a product/component where they are not valid
  • [1149593] Hovering over “Copy Summary” changes the button to a grey box
  • [1171523] Change Loop product to Hello
  • [1175928] flag changes made at the same time as a cc change are not visible without showing cc changes
  • [1175644] The cpanfile created by checksetup.pl defines the same feature multiple times, breaking cpanm
  • [1176362] [Voting] When a user votes enough to confirm an individual bug, the bug does not change to CONFIRMED properly
  • [1176368] [Voting] When updating votestoconfirm to a new value, bugs with enough votes are not moved to CONFIRMED properly
  • [1161797] Use document.execCommand(“copy”) instead of flash where it is available
  • [1177239] Please create a “Taskcluster Platform” product
  • [1144485] Adapt upstream Selenium test suite to BMO
  • [1178301] webservice_bug_update.t Parse errors: Bad plan. You planned 927 tests but ran 921
  • [1163170] Giving firefox-backlog-drivers rights to edit the Rank field anywhere it appears in bugzilla
  • [1171758] Persistent xss is possible on Firefox

discuss these changes on mozilla.tools.bmo.


Filed under: bmo, mozilla
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mark Finkle: Random Thoughts on Management

Mozilla planet - to, 02/07/2015 - 05:11

I have ended up managing people at the last three places I’ve worked, over the last 18 years. I can honestly say that only in the last few years have I really started to embrace the job of managing. Here’s a collection of thoughts and observations:

Growth: Ideas and Opinions and Failures

Expose your team to new ideas and help them create their own voice. When people get bored or feel they aren’t growing, they’ll look elsewhere. Give people time to explore new concepts, while trying to keep results and outcomes relevant to the project.

Opinions are not bad. A team without opinions is bad. Encourage people to develop opinions about everything. Encourage them to evolve their opinions as they gain new experiences.

“Good judgement comes from experience, and experience comes from bad judgement” – Frederick P. Brooks

Create an environment where differing viewpoints are welcomed, so people can learn multiple ways to approach a problem.

Failures are not bad. Failing means trying, and you want people who try to accomplish work that might be a little beyond their current reach. It’s how they grow. Your job is keeping the failures small, so they can learn from the failure, but not jeopardize the project.

Creating Paths: Technical versus Management

It’s important to have an opinion about the ways a management track is different than a technical track. Create a path for managers. Create a different path for technical leaders.

Management tracks have highly visible promotion paths. Organization structure changes, company-wide emails, and being included in more meetings and decision making. Technical track promotions are harder to notice if you don’t also increase the person’s responsibilities and decision making role.

Moving up either track means more responsibility and more accountability. Find ways to delegate decision making to leaders on the team. Make those leaders accountable for outcomes.

Train your engineers to be successful managers. There is a tradition in software development to use the most senior engineer to fill openings in management. This is wrong. Look for people that have a proclivity for working with people. Give those people management-like challenges and opportunities. Once they (and you) are confident in taking on management, promote them.

Snowflakes: Engineers are Different

Engineers, even great ones, have strengthens and weaknesses. As a manager, you need to learn these for each person on your team. People can be very strong at starting new projects, building something from nothing. Others can be great at finishing, making sure the work is ready to release. Some excel at user-facing code, others love writing back-end services. Leverage your team’s strengthens to efficiently ship products.

“A 1:1 is your chance to perform weekly preventive maintenance while also understanding the health of your team” – Michael Lopp (rands)

The better you know your team, the less likely you will create bored, passionless drones. Don’t treat engineers as fungible, swapable resources. Set them, and the team, up for success. Keep people engaged and passionate about the work.

Further Reading

The Role of a Senior Developer
On Being A Senior Engineer
Want to Know Difference Between a CTO and a VP of Engineering?
Thoughts on the Technical Track
The Update, The Vent, and The Disaster
Bored People Quit
Strong Opinions, Weakly Held

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Karl Dubost: Web Components, Stories Of Scars

Mozilla planet - to, 02/07/2015 - 03:51

Chris Heilmann has written about Web Components.

If you want to see the mess that is the standardisation effort around web components right now in all its ugliness, Wilson Page wrote a great post on that on Mozilla Hacks. Make sure to also read the comments – lots of good stuff there.

Indeed a very good blog post to read. Then Chris went on saying:

Web Components are a great idea. Modules are a great idea. Together, they bring us hours and hours of fun debating where what should be done to create a well-performing, easy to maintain and all around extensible complex app for the web.

This is twitching in the back of my mind for the last couple of weeks. And I kind of remember a wicked pattern from 10 years ago. Enter Compound Document Formats (CDF) with its WICD (read wicked) specifications. If you think I'm silly, check the CDF FAQ:

When combining content from arbitrary sources, a number of problems present themselves, including how rendering is handled when crossing from one markup language to another, or how events propagate across the same boundaries, or how to interpret the meaning of a piece of content within an unanticipated context.

and

Simply put, a compound document is a mixture of content in any number of formats. Compound documents range from static (say, XHTML that includes a simple SVG illustration) to very dynamic (a full-fledged Web Application). A compound document may include its parts directly (such as when you include an SVG image in an XHTML file) or by reference (such as when you embed a separate SVG document in XHTML using an <object> element. There are benefits to both, and the application should determine which one you use. For instance, inclusion by reference facilitates reuse and eases maintenance of a large number of resources. Direct inclusion can improve portability or offline use. W3C will support both modes, called CDR ("compound documents by reference") and CDI ("compound documents by inclusion").

At that time, the Web and W3C, where full throttle on XML and namespaces. Now, the cool kids on the block are full HTML, JSON, polymers and JS frameworks. But if you look carefully and remove the syntax, architecture parts, the narrative is the same. And with the narratives of the battle and its scars, the Web Components sound very familiar to the Coupound Document Format.

Still by Chris

When it comes to componentising the web, the rabbit hole is deep and also a maze.

Note that not everything was lost from WICD. It helped develop a couple of things, and reimagine the platform. Stay tune, I think we will have surprises on this story. Not over yet.

Modularity has already a couple of scars when thinking about large distribution. Remember Opendoc and OLE. I still remember using Cyberdog. Fun times.

Otsukare!

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

What to Look Forward to from Firefox

Mozilla Futurereleases - to, 02/07/2015 - 03:22

We created Firefox more than a decade ago with a mission to give people transparency, choice and control online. Since then, the browser has continued to evolve its critical role in how users experience the Web and control their online lives.

That’s why at Mozilla we’re always focused on one question: how do we make Firefox even better and continue to delight users? Because we are different than most tech companies and work in the open, we are sharing some experiments centered around the three focus areas of our strategy.

Firefox Pillars

 

Uncompromised Quality

The first focus area is delivering an uncompromised user experience that ensures Firefox meets the most rigorous of quality and performance standards. This commitment is evident in the strides we’re making to improve the richest Web experiences like HTML5 video playback and game performance.  We’ll also soon deliver Firefox to new platforms, such as Firefox for iOS and Windows 10, where we will provide an independent and high-performing alternative to the stock browser.

Best Of The Web

Firefox is well known for giving users complete control over their Web experience while pushing the boundaries of the “modern browser.” Today, we’re working with more partners and developers around the world to highlight innovation and offer the best of the Web in Firefox. We showed this with our new search strategy for Firefox to promote choice and innovation and with new open technologies we build based on standards including Firefox Hello, the first WebRTC in-browser video chat tool made in partnership with Telefonica. We continue to pioneer open standards including WebVR, WebGL and WebRTC to advance the Web as the development platform.

Uniquely Firefox

Earlier this year, we asked users to identify what’s different about Firefox and the results reaffirmed our view that it’s important for Firefox to be increasingly recognized for attributes such as performance, trust and quality that align with our mission.

We value that our users trust us because we protect their choices and protect their privacy. That’s why we are experimenting with improvements to private browsing and other unique features for a major release focused on these three areas that we’ll share with Firefox users later this year.

Stay tuned for more.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla CEO: Virtual-reality Firefox could be game-changer - USA TODAY

Nieuws verzameld via Google - to, 02/07/2015 - 00:01

Mozilla CEO: Virtual-reality Firefox could be game-changer
USA TODAY
SAN FRANCISCO—Mozilla has started letting outside developers use a test version of its Firefox browser with new virtual-reality technology that could make surfing the web more like watching movies or playing video games. If the beta version of the ...

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla Addons Blog: Add-ons Update – Week of 2015/07/01

Mozilla planet - to, 02/07/2015 - 00:00

I post these updates every 3 weeks to inform add-on developers about the status of the review queues, add-on compatibility, and other happenings in the add-ons world.

Add-ons Forum

As we announced before, there’s a new add-ons community forum for all topics related to AMO or add-ons in general. The Add-ons category is already the most active one on the community forum, so thank you all for your contributions! The old forum is still available in read-only mode.

The Review Queues
  • Most nominations for full review are taking less than 10 weeks to review.
  • 272 nominations in the queue awaiting review.
  • Most updates are being reviewed within 8 weeks.
  • 159 updates in the queue awaiting review.
  • Most preliminary reviews are being reviewed within 10 weeks.
  • 295 preliminary review submissions in the queue awaiting review.

A number of factors have lead to the current state of the queues: increased submissions, decreased volunteer reviewer participation, and a Mozilla-wide event that took most of our attention last week. We’re back and our main focus are the review queues. We have a new reviewer on our team, who will hopefully make a difference in the state of the queues.

If you’re an add-on developer and would like to see add-ons reviewed faster, please consider joining us. Add-on reviewers get invited to Mozilla events and earn cool gear with their work. Visit our wiki page for more information.

Firefox 40 Compatibility

The Firefox 40 compatibility blog post is up. The automatic compatibility validation will be run in a few weeks.

As always, we recommend that you test your add-ons on Beta and Firefox Developer Edition (formerly known as Aurora) to make sure that they continue to work correctly. End users can install the Add-on Compatibility Reporter to identify and report any add-ons that aren’t working anymore.

Extension Signing

We announced that we will require extensions to be signed in order for them to continue to work in release and beta versions of Firefox. The wiki page on Extension Signing has information about the timeline, as well as responses to some frequently asked questions.

There’s a small change to the timeline: Firefox 40 will only warn about unsigned extensions (for all channels), Firefox 41 will disable unsigned extensions  by default unless a preference is toggled (on Beta and Release), and Firefox 42 will not have the preference. This means that we’ll have an extra release cycle before signatures are enforced by default.

Electrolysis

Electrolysis, also known as e10s, is the next major compatibility change coming to Firefox. In a nutshell, Firefox will run on multiple processes now, running content code in a different process than browser code. This should improve responsiveness and overall stability, but it also means many add-ons will need to be updated to support this.

We will be talking more about these changes in this blog in the future. For now we recommend you start looking at the available documentation.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Christian Heilmann: Over the Edge: Web Components are an endangered species

Mozilla planet - wo, 01/07/2015 - 22:00

Last week I ran the panel and the web components/modules breakout session of the excellent Edge Conference in London, England and I think I did quite a terrible job. The reason was that the topic is too large and too fragmented and broken to be taken on as a bundle.

If you want to see the mess that is the standardisation effort around web components right now in all its ugliness, Wilson Page wrote a great post on that on Mozilla Hacks. Make sure to also read the comments – lots of good stuff there.

Web Components are a great idea. Modules are a great idea. Together, they bring us hours and hours of fun debating where what should be done to create a well-performing, easy to maintain and all around extensible complex app for the web. Along the way we can throw around lots of tools and ideas like NPM and ES6 imports or – as Alex Russell said it on the panel: “tooling will save you”.

It does. But that was always the case. When browsers didn’t support CSS, we had Dreamweaver to create horribly nested tables that achieved the same effect. There is always a way to make browsers do what we want them to do. In the past, we did a lot of convoluted things client-side with libraries. With the advent of node and others we now have even more environments to innovate and release “not for production ready” impressive and clever solutions.

When it comes to componentising the web, the rabbit hole is deep and also a maze. Many developers don’t have time to even start digging and use libraries like Polymer or React instead and call it a day and that the “de facto standard” (a term that makes my toenails crawl up – layout tables were a “de facto standard”, so was Flash video).

React did a genius thing: by virtualising the DOM, it avoided a lot of the problems with browsers. But it also means that you forfeit all the good things the DOM gives you in terms of accessibility and semantics/declarative code. It simply is easier to write a <super-button> than to create a fragment for it or write it in JavaScript.

Of course, either are easy for us clever and amazing developers, but the fact is that the web is not for developers. It is a publishing platform, and we are moving away from that concept at a ridiculous pace.

And whilst React gives us all the goodness of Web Components now, it is also a library by a commercial company. That it is open source, doesn’t make much of a difference. YUI showed that a truckload of innovation can go into “maintenance mode” very quickly when a company’s direction changes. I have high hopes for React, but I am also worried about dependencies on a single company.

Let’s rewind and talk about Web Components

Let’s do away with modules and imports for now, as I think this is a totally different discussion.

I always loved the idea of Web Components – allowing me to write widgets in the browser that work with it rather than against it is an incredible idea. Years of widget frameworks trying to get the correct performance out of a browser whilst empowering maintainers would come to a fruitful climax. Yes, please, give me a way to write my own controls, inherit from existing ones and share my independent components with other developers.

However, in four years, we haven’t got much to show.. When we asked the very captive and elite audience of EdgeConf about Web Components, nobody raised their hand that they are using them in real products. People either used React or Polymer as there is still no way to use Web Components in production otherwise. When we tried to find examples in the wild, the meager harvest was GitHub’s time element. I do hope that this was not all we wrote and many a company is ready to go with Web Components. But most discussions I had ended up the same way: people are interested, tried them out once and had to bail out because of lack of browser support.

Web Components are a chicken and egg problem where we are currently trying to define the chicken and have many a different idea what an egg could be. Meanwhile, people go to chicken-meat based fast food places to get quick results. And others increasingly mention that we should hide the chicken and just give people the eggs leaving the chicken farming to those who also know how to build a hen-house. OK, I might have taken that metaphor a bit far.

We all agreed that XHTML2 sucked, was overly complicated, and defined without the input of web developers. I get the weird feeling that Web Components and modules are going in the same direction.

In 2012 I wrote a longer post as an immediate response to Google’s big announcement of the foundation of the web platform following Alex Russell’s presentation at Fronteers 11 showing off what Web Components could do. In it I kind of lamented the lack of clean web code and the focus on developer convenience over clarity. Last year, I listed a few dangers of web components. Today, I am not too proud to admit that I lost sight of what is going on. And I am not alone. As Wilson’s post on Mozilla Hacks shows, the current state is messy to say the least.

We need to enable web developers to use “vanilla” web components

What we need is a base to start from. In the browser and in a browser that users have and doesn’t ask them to turn on a flag. Without that, Web Components are doomed to become a “too complex” standard that nobody implements but instead relies on libraries.

During the breakout session, one of the interesting proposals was to turn Bootstrap components into web components and start with that. Tread the cowpath of what people use and make it available to see how it performs.

Of course, this is a big gamble and it means consensus across browser makers. But we had that with HTML5. Maybe there is a chance for harmony amongst competitors for the sake of an extensible and modularised web that is not dependent on ES6 availability across browsers. We’re probably better off with implementing one sci-fi idea at a time.

I wished I could be more excited or positive about this. But it left me with a sour taste in my mouth to see that EdgeConf, that hot-house of web innovation and think-tank of many very intelligent people were as confused as I was.

I’d love to see a “let’s turn it on and see what happens” instead of “but, wait, this could happen”. Of course, it isn’t that simple – and the Mozilla Hacks post explains this well – but a boy can dream, right? Remember when using HTML5 video was just a dream?

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

David Burns: Who wants to be an alpha tester for Marionette?

Mozilla planet - wo, 01/07/2015 - 21:57

Are you an early adopter type? Are you an avid user of WebDriver and want to use the latest and great technology? Then you are most definitely in luck.

Marionette, the Mozilla implementation of the FirefoxDriver, is ready for a very limited outing. There is a lot of things that have not been implemented or, since we are implementing things agains the WebDriver Specification they might not have enough prose to implement (This has been a great way to iron out spec bugs).

Getting Started

At the moment, since things are still being developed and we are trying to do things with new technologies (like writing part this project using Rust) we are starting out with supporting Linux and OS X first. Windows support will be coming in the future!

Getting the driver We have binaries that you can download. For Linux and for OS X . The only bindings currently updated to work are the python bindings that are available in a branch on my fork of the Selenium project. Do the following to get it into a virtualenv:
  1. Create a virtualenv
  2. activate your virtualenv
  3. cd to where you have cloned my repository
  4. In a terminal type the following: ./go py_install
Running tests

Running tests against marionette requires that you do the following changes (which hopefully remains small)

Update the desired capability to have marionette:true and add binary:/path/to/Firefox/DeveloperEdition/or/Nightly. We are only supporting those two versions of at the moment because we have had a couple in compatible issues that we have fixed which means speaking to Marionette in the browser in the beta or release versions quite difficult.

Since you are awesome early adopters it would be great if we could raise bugs. I am not expecting everything to work but below is a quick list that I know doesn't work.

  • No support for self-signed certificates
  • No support for actions
  • No support for Proxy (but will be there soon)
  • No support logging endpoint
  • I am sure there are other things we don't remember

Thanks for being an early adopter and thanks for raising bugs as you find them!

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Will Kahn-Greene: Ditching ElasticUtils on Input for elasticsearch-dsl-py

Mozilla planet - wo, 01/07/2015 - 20:20
What was it?

ElasticUtils was a Python library for building and executing Elasticsearch searches. I picked up maintenance after the original authors moved on with their lives, did a lot of work, released many versions and eventually ended the project in January 2015.

Why end it? A bunch of reasons.

It started at PyCon 2014, when I had a long talk with Rob, Jannis, and Erik about ElasticUtils the new library Honza was working on which became elasticsearch-dsl-py.

At the time, I knew that ElasticUtils had a bunch of architectural decisions that turned out to be make life really hard. Doing some things was hard. It was built for a pre-1.0 Elasticsearch and it would have been a monumental effort to upgrade it past the Elasticsearch 1.0 hump. The code wasn't structured particularly well. I was tired of working on it.

Honza's library had a lot of promise and did the sorts of things that ElasticUtils should have done and did them better--even at that ridiculously early stage of development.

By the end of PyCon 2014, I was pretty sure elasticsearch-dsl-py was the future. The only question was whether to gut ElasticUtils and make it a small shim on top of elasticsearch-dsl-py or end it.

In January 2015, I decided to just end it because I didn't see a compelling reason to keep it around or rewrite it into something on top of elasticsearch-dsl-py. Thus I ended it.

Now to migrate to something different.

Read more… (7 mins to read)

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Hannah Kane: Whistler Wrap-up

Mozilla planet - wo, 01/07/2015 - 19:03

What an amazing week!

Last week members of the Mozilla community met in beautiful Whistler, BC to celebrate, reflect, brainstorm, and plan (and eat snacks). While much of the week was spent in functional teams (that is, designers with designers and engineers with engineers), the Mozilla Learning Network website (known informally as “Teach”) team was able to convene for two meetings—one focused on our process, and the other on our roadmap and plans for the future.

Breakthroughs

From my perspective, the week inspired a few significant breakthroughs:

  1. The Mozilla Learning Network is one, unified team with several offerings. Those offerings can be summarized in this image: Networks, Groups, and Convenings.MLN ProgramsThe breakthrough was realizing that it’s urgent that the site reflects the full spectrum of offerings as soon as possible. We’ve adjusted our roadmap accordingly. First up: incorporate the Hive content in a way that makes sense to our audience, and provides clear pathways for engagement.
  2. Our Clubs pipeline is a bit off-balance. We have more interested Club Captains than our current (amazing) Regional Coordinators can support. This inspired an important conversation about changes to our strategy to better test out our model. We’ll be talking about how these changes are reflected on the site soon.
  3. The most important content to localize is our curriculum content. To be fair, we knew this before the work week, but it was definitely crystallized in Whistler. This gives useful shape to our localization plan.
  4. We also identified a few areas where we can begin the process of telling the full “Mozilla Learning” story. By that I mean the work that goes beyond what we call the Mozilla Learning Network—for example, we can highlight our Fellowship programs, curriculum from other teams (starting with Mozilla Science Lab!), and additional peer learning opportunities.
  5. Finally, we identified a few useful, targeted performance indicators that will help us gauge our success: 1) the # of curriculum hits, and 2) the % of site visitors who take the pledge to teach.
Site Updates

I also want to share a few site updates that have happened since I wrote last:

    • The flow for Clubs has been adjusted to reflect the “apply, connect, approve” model described in an earlier post.
    • We’ve added a Protect Your Data curriculum module with six great activities.
    • We added the “Pledge to Teach” action on the homepage. Visitors to the site can choose to take the pledge, and are then notified about an optional survey they can take. We’ll follow up with tailored offerings based on their survey responses.pledge

Questions? Ideas? Share ’em in the comments!


Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Onderzoeker omzeilt Firefox NoScript via Google cloud - Security.nl

Nieuws verzameld via Google - wo, 01/07/2015 - 18:44

Onderzoeker omzeilt Firefox NoScript via Google cloud
Security.nl
Een aantal domeinen staan standaard al op de whitelist van NoScript, zoals die van Mozilla, YouTube, Google en Yahoo. Het gaat hierbij niet alleen om de domeinen, maar ook de subdomeinen die onder het domein vallen. Naast google.com worden ook ...

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Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Gervase Markham: Top 50 DOS Problems Solved: Squashing Files

Mozilla planet - wo, 01/07/2015 - 17:53

Q: I post files containing DTP pages and graphics on floppy disks to a bureau for printing. Recently I produced a file that was too big to fit on the disk and I know that I will be producing more in the future. What’s the best way round the problem?

A. There are a number of solutions, most of them expensive. For example, both you and the bureau could buy modems. A modem is a device that allows computers to be connected via a phone line. You would need software, known as a comms program, to go with the modems. This will allow direct PC-to-PC transfer of files without the need for floppy disks. Since your files are so large, you would need a fast 9600 baud modem [Ed: approx 1 kilobyte per second] with MNP5 compression/error correction to make this a viable option.

In this case, however, I would get hold of a utility program called LHA which is widely available from the shareware/PD libraries that advertise in PC Answers. In earlier incarnations it was known as LHarc. LHA enables you to squash files into less space than they occupied before.

The degree of compression depends on the nature of the file. Graphics and text work best, so for you this is a likely solution. The bureau will need a copy of LHA to un-squash the files before it can use them, or you can use LHA in a special way that makes the compressed files self-unpacking.

LHA has a great advantage over rival utilities in that the author allows you to use it for free. There is no registration fee, as with the similar shareware program PKZip, for example.

Every time they brought out a new, larger hard disk, they used to predict the end of the need for compression…

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Botond Ballo: C++ Concepts TS could be voted for publication on July 20

Mozilla planet - wo, 01/07/2015 - 16:00

In my report on the C++ standards meeting this May, I described the status of the Concepts TS as of the end of the meeting:

  • The committee’s Core Working Group (CWG) was working on addressing comments received from national standards bodies.
  • CWG planned to hold a post-meeting teleconference to complete the final wording including the resolutions of the comments.
  • The committee would then have the option of holding a committee-wide teleconference to vote the final wording for publication, or else delay this vote until the next face-to-face meeting in October.

I’m excited to report that the CWG telecon has taken place, final wording has been produced, and the committee-wide telecon to approve the final wording has been scheduled for July 20.

If this vote goes through, the final wording of the Concepts TS will be sent to ISO for publication, and the TS will be officially published within a few months!


Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla delays Firefox 39 update over stability issue - Product Reviews

Nieuws verzameld via Google - wo, 01/07/2015 - 11:27

Product Reviews

Mozilla delays Firefox 39 update over stability issue
Product Reviews
Firefox 39 was finally meant to go out of beta, as its public release was due to be released yesterday for Android, Linux, Mac and Windows. However, Mozilla had to delay the Firefox 39 download because of a stability issue that plagued the browser at ...
Firefox 39 arrives with Hello link sharing, smoother animation and scrolling ...VentureBeat
Firefox 39 beta lets users link Hello to social accountsThe Next Web

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