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Mozilla Wants Heads-Up From FBI on Tor Browser Hack - The Intercept

Nieuws verzameld via Google - to, 12/05/2016 - 17:07

The Intercept

Mozilla Wants Heads-Up From FBI on Tor Browser Hack
The Intercept
The maker of the Firefox browser is wading into an increasingly contentious court battle over an undisclosed security vulnerability the FBI used to track down anonymous users of a child-porn site. The FBI took over a dark web child-pornography site ...
Mozilla wants US to disclose to it first any vulnerability found in TorComputerworld
Mozilla asks court to disclose Tor bug the FBI exploited to catch pedophilesThe Next Web
Mozilla seeks court order requiring US government to divulge possible Firefox ...VentureBeat
The Hill -Gizmodo -ZDNet
alle 17 nieuwsartikelen »
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla Wants More Details on Browser Bug Exploited in an FBI Probe - Fortune

Nieuws verzameld via Google - to, 12/05/2016 - 16:34

Fortune

Mozilla Wants More Details on Browser Bug Exploited in an FBI Probe
Fortune
Mozilla has asked a federal judge to order the U.S. government to disclose a vulnerability in its Firefox web browser that the company says the FBI exploited to investigate users of a large and secretive child pornography website. Mozilla filed papers ...
Mozilla asks FBI for details on potential Firefox vulnerability used in Tor hackPCWorld
Mozilla asks court to disclose Tor bug the FBI exploited to catch pedophilesThe Next Web
Mozilla seeks court order requiring US government to divulge possible Firefox ...VentureBeat
Gizmodo -BetaNews -Motherboard
alle 15 nieuwsartikelen »
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Daniel Glazman: BlueGriffon 2.0 approaching...

Mozilla planet - to, 12/05/2016 - 15:48

BlueGriffon 2.0 is approaching, a major revamp of my cross-platform Wysiwyg Gecko-based editor. You can find previews here for OSX, Windows and Ubuntu 16.04 (64 bits).

BlueGriffon 2.0

Warnings:

  • it's HIGHLY recommended to NOT overwrite your existing 1.7 or 1.8 version ; install it for instance in /tmp instead of /Applications
  • it's VERY HIGHLY recommended to start it creating a dedicated profile
    • open BlueGriffon.app --args -profilemanager (on OSX)
    • bluegriffon.exe -profilemanager (on Windows)
  • add-ons will NOT work with it, don't even try to install them in your test profile
  • it's a work in progress, expect bugs, issues and more

Changes:

- major revamp, you won't even recognize the app :-) - based on a very recent version of Gecko, that was a HUGE work. - no more floating panels, too hacky and expensive to maintain - rendering engine support added for Blink, Servo, Vivliostyle and Weasyprint! - tons of debugging in *all* areas of the app - BlueGriffon now uses the native colorpicker on OSX. Yay!!! The native colorpicker of Windows is so weak and ugly we just can't use it (it can't even deal with opacity...) and decided to stick to our own implementation. On Linux, the situation is more complicated, the colorpicker is not as ugly as the Windows' one, but it's unfortunately too weak compared to what our own offers. - more CSS properties handled - helper link from each CSS property in the UI to MDN - better templates handling - auto-reload of html documents if modified outside of BlueGriffon - better Markdown support - zoom in Source View - tech changes for future improvements: support for :active and other dynamic pseudo-classes, support for ::before and ::after pseudo-elements in CSS Properties; rely on Gecko's CSS lexer instead of our own. We're also working on cool new features on the CSS side like CSS Variables and even much cooler than that :-)
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Christian Heilmann: ChakraCore and Node musings at NodeConf London

Mozilla planet - to, 12/05/2016 - 13:50

Yesterday morning I dragged myself to present at NodeConf London in the Barbican to present. Dragged not because I didn’t want to, but because I had 3 hours sleep coming back from Beyond Tellerand the day before.

Presenting at NodeConfLondonPhoto by Adrian Alexa

I didn’t quite have time to prepare my talk, and I ended up finishing my slides 5 minutes before it. That’s why I was, to use a simple term, shit scared of my talk. I’m not that involved in the goings on in Node, and the impostor in me assumed the whole audience to be all experts and me making an utter berk of myself. However, this being a good starting point I just went with it and used the opportunity to speak to an audience that much in the know about something I want Node to be.

I see the Node environment and ecosystem as an excellent opportunity to test out new JavaScript features and ideas without the issue of browser interoperability and incompatibility.

The thing I never was at ease about it though is that *everything is based on on one JS engine&. This is not how you define and test out a standard. You need to have several runtimes to execute your code. Much like a browser monoculture was a terrible thing and gave us thousands of now unmaintainable and hard to use web sites, not opening ourselves to various engines can lead to terrible scripts and apps based on Node.

The talk video is already live and you can also see all the other talks in this playlist:

The slides are on Slideshare:

NodeConfLondon – Making ES6 happen with ChakraCore and Node from Christian Heilmann

A screencast recording of the talk is on YouTube.

Resources I mentioned:

I was very happy to get amazing feedback from everyone I met, and that people thoroughly enjoyed my presentation. Goes to show that the voice in your head telling you that you’re not good enough often is just being a a dick.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla asks FBI for details on potential Firefox vulnerability used in Tor hack - PCWorld

Nieuws verzameld via Google - to, 12/05/2016 - 13:33

PCWorld

Mozilla asks FBI for details on potential Firefox vulnerability used in Tor hack
PCWorld
Mozilla has asked a court that it should be provided information on a vulnerability in the Tor browser ahead of it being provided to a defendant in a lawsuit, as the browser is based in part on Firefox browser code. “At this point, no one (including us ...
Mozilla seeks court order requiring US government to divulge possible Firefox ...VentureBeat
Mozilla asks court to disclose Tor bug the FBI exploited to catch pedophilesThe Next Web
Mozilla Begs Court for Details About Pedophile Tor Hack to Keep Firefox SafeGizmodo
Motherboard -TechWeekEurope UK
alle 9 nieuwsartikelen »
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla wants US to disclose to it first any vulnerability found in Tor - Computerworld

Nieuws verzameld via Google - to, 12/05/2016 - 12:01

Gizmodo

Mozilla wants US to disclose to it first any vulnerability found in Tor
Computerworld
Mozilla has asked a court that it should be provided information on a vulnerability in the Tor browser ahead of it being provided to a defendant in a lawsuit, as the browser is based in part on Firefox browser code. “At this point, no one (including us ...
Mozilla Begs Court for Details About Pedophile Tor Hack to Keep Firefox SafeGizmodo
Mozilla asks court to disclose Tor bug the FBI exploited to catch pedophilesThe Next Web
Mozilla seeks court order requiring US government to divulge possible Firefox ...VentureBeat
Motherboard -TechWeekEurope UK
alle 8 nieuwsartikelen »
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla lanceert testprogramma voor Firefox - WINMAG Pro

Nieuws verzameld via Google - to, 12/05/2016 - 11:51

WINMAG Pro

Mozilla lanceert testprogramma voor Firefox
WINMAG Pro
Firefox-maker Mozilla roept de hulp in van gebruikers. De nieuwe tool Test Pilot is bedoeld om feedback te verzamelen van gebruikers. Mozilla wil namelijk graag weten naar welke functies vraag is en hoe die zouden moeten werken.
Mozilla laat gebruikers experimentele Firefox-functies testen via add-onTweakers
Firefox gebruikers kunnen experimentele features uitproberen met Test PilotHardware.Info
Firefox Test Pilot laat je spelen met experimentele functiesZDNet.be

alle 4 nieuwsartikelen »
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla wil dat FBI details over Firefox-lek openbaar maakt - Security.nl

Nieuws verzameld via Google - to, 12/05/2016 - 11:27

Mozilla wil dat FBI details over Firefox-lek openbaar maakt
Security.nl
Mozilla wil dat als de FBI over een kwetsbaarheid in Firefox beschikt, het die ook openbaar maakt. De opensource-ontwikkelaar heeft hiervoor een brief naar de rechter gestuurd. Aanleiding is een zaak waarbij de FBI naar verluidt een beveiligingslek in ...

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla wil dat FBI details over Firefox-lek openbaar maakt - Security.nl

Nieuws verzameld via Google - to, 12/05/2016 - 11:27

Mozilla wil dat FBI details over Firefox-lek openbaar maakt
Security.nl
Mozilla wil dat als de FBI over een kwetsbaarheid in Firefox beschikt, het die ook openbaar maakt. De opensource-ontwikkelaar heeft hiervoor een brief naar de rechter gestuurd. Aanleiding is een zaak waarbij de FBI naar verluidt een beveiligingslek in ...

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Software-update: Mozilla Thunderbird 45.1.0 - Tweakers

Nieuws verzameld via Google - to, 12/05/2016 - 07:56

Tweakers

Software-update: Mozilla Thunderbird 45.1.0
Tweakers
Mozilla Thunderbird logo (90 pix) De Mozilla Foundation heeft versie 45.1.0 van Thunderbird uitgebracht. Mozilla Thunderbird is een opensourceclient voor e-mail en nieuwsgroepen, met features als ondersteuning voor verschillende mail- en newsaccounts, ...

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Karl Dubost: Schools Of Thoughts In Web Standards

Mozilla planet - to, 12/05/2016 - 07:29

Last night, I had the pleasure of reading Daniel Stenberg's blog post about URL Standards. It led me to the discussion happening about the WHATWG URL spec about "It's not immediately clear that "URL syntax" and "URL parser" conflict". As you can expect, the debate is inflammatory on both sides, border line hypocrite at some occasions and with a lot of the arguments I have seen in the last 20 years I have followed discussions around the Web development.

This post has no intent to be the right way to talk about it. It's more a collection of impression I had when reading the thread with my baggage of ex-W3C staff, Web agency work and, ex-Opera and now-Mozilla Web Compatibility work.

"Le chat a bon dos". French expression to basically say we are in the blaming game in that thread. Maybe not that useful.

What is happening?

  • Deployed Web Content: Yes there is a lot of content broken out there and some of it will never be fixed which ever effort you put into it. That's normal and this is not a broken per se. Think about abandon editions of old dictionaries with mistakes into it. History and fabric of time. What should happen? When a mistake is frequent enough, it is interesting to try to have a part of the parsing algorithm to recover it. The decision then becomes to decide on frequent enough meaning. And that opens a new debate in itself, because it's dependent on countries, market shares, specific communities. Everything the society can provide in terms of economy, social behavior, history, etc.
  • Browsers: We can also often read in that thread, that it's not browser's fault, it's because of the Web Content. Well that's not entirely true too. When a browser recovers from a previously-considered-broken pattern found on the Web, it just entrenches the pattern. Basically, it's not an act of saying, we need to be compatible with the deployed content (aka not our fault). It would be a false pretense. It's an implementation decision which further drags the once-broken-pattern into a the normal patterns of the Web, a standardization process (a king of jurisprudence). So basically it's about recognizing that this term, pattern is now part of the bigger picture. There's no such things as saying: "It is good for people who decide to be compatible with browsers" (read "Join us or go to hell, I don't want to discuss with you."). There's a form of understandable escapism here to hide a responsibility and to hide the burden of creating a community. It would be more exact to say "Yes, we make the decision that the Web should be this and not anything else." It doesn't make the discussion easier but it's more the point of the power play in place.
  • $BROWSER lord: In the discussion, the $BROWSER is Google's Chrome. A couple of years ago, it was IE. Again, saying Chrome has no specific responsibility is again an escapism. The same way that Safari has a lot of influences on the mobile Web, Chrome currently by its market share creates a tide which influences a lot the Web content and its patterns out there. I can guarantee that it's easier now for Chrome to be stricter with regards to syntax than it is for Edge or Firefox. Opera had to give up its rendering engine (Presto) because of this and switched to blink.

There are different schools for the Web specifications:

  1. Standards defining a syntax considered ideal and free for implementations to recover with their own strategy when it's broken.
  2. Standards defining how to recover for all the possible ways it is mixed up. By doing that the intent is often to recover from a previous stricter syntax, but in the end it is just defining, expanding the possibilities.
  3. Standards defining a different policy for parsing and producing with certain nuances in between. [Kind of Postel's law.].

I'm swaying in between these three schools all the time. I don't like the number 2 at all, but because of survival it is sometimes necessary. My preferred way it's 3, having a clear strict syntax for producing content, and a recovery parsing technique. And when possible I would prefer a sanitizer version of the Postel's law.

What did he say btw?

RFC 760

The implementation of a protocol must be robust. Each implementation must expect to interoperate with others created by different individuals. While the goal of this specification is to be explicit about the protocol there is the possibility of differing interpretations. In general, an implementation should be conservative in its sending behavior, and liberal in its receiving behavior. That is, it should be careful to send well-formed datagrams, but should accept any datagram that it can interpret (e.g., not object to technical errors where the meaning is still clear).

Then in RFC 1122: The 1.2.2 section, the Robustness Principle

At every layer of the protocols, there is a general rule whose application can lead to enormous benefits in robustness and interoperability [IP:1]:

"Be liberal in what you accept, and conservative in what you send"

Software should be written to deal with every conceivable error, no matter how unlikely; sooner or later a packet will come in with that particular combination of errors and attributes, and unless the software is prepared, chaos can ensue. In general, it is best to assume that the network is filled with malevolent entities that will send in packets designed to have the worst possible effect. This assumption will lead to suitable protective design, although the most serious problems in the Internet have been caused by unenvisaged mechanisms triggered by low-probability events; mere human malice would never have taken so devious a course!

Adaptability to change must be designed into all levels of Internet host software. As a simple example, consider a protocol specification that contains an enumeration of values for a particular header field -- e.g., a type field, a port number, or an error code; this enumeration must be assumed to be incomplete. Thus, if a protocol specification defines four possible error codes, the software must not break when a fifth code shows up. An undefined code might be logged (see below), but it must not cause a failure.

The second part of the principle is almost as important: software on other hosts may contain deficiencies that make it unwise to exploit legal but obscure protocol features. It is unwise to stray far from the obvious and simple, lest untoward effects result elsewhere. A corollary of this is "watch out for misbehaving hosts"; host software should be prepared, not just to survive other misbehaving hosts, but also to cooperate to limit the amount of disruption such hosts can cause to the shared communication facility.

The important point in the discussion of Postel's law is that he is talking about software behavior, not specifications. The new school of thoughts for Web standards is to create specification which are "software-driven", not "syntax-driven". And it's why you can read entrenched debates about the technology.

My sanitizer version of the Postel's law would be something along:

  1. Be liberal in what you accept
  2. Be conservative in what you send
  3. Make conservative what you accepted (aka fixing it)

Basically when you receive something broken, and there is a clear path for fixing it, do it. Normalize it. In the debated version, about accepting http://////, it would be

  • parse it as http://////
  • communicate it to the next step as http:// and possibly with an optional notification it has been recovered.

Otsukare!

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mike Taylor: MITM compatibility issues

Mozilla planet - to, 12/05/2016 - 07:00

(Alternate title: Kaspersky is one typo away from being called Kaspesky)

Bug 1271875 is an interesting case of a compat issue not caused by a website, or a browser, but by a 3rd party. In this case, Kaspersky AntiVirus.

Apparently they Malcolm in the Middle you to keep you safe:

screenshot of facebook.com cert

I guess that's normal for Anti-Virus programs?

(Personally I stay safe via a combination of essential oils and hyper-link homeopathy.)

Anyways, the issue is that Facebook just turned on Brotli compression for some of their HTML resources. Which is great! Firefox supports that since v44, and it makes Facebook faster for its users.

Kaspersky's MITM happily sends Accept-Encoding: br in the request but strips Content-Encoding: br from the response. Suddenly Facebook looks like ISIS is trying to hack you:

screenshot of facebook.com all jacked up

So, in this instance, if Facebook.com looks like binary garbage in your Firefox (and you have Kaspersky AV installed), consider a new anti-virus strategy (ideally they'll also have an update very soon if you're somehow stuck with it).

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla wants US to disclose to it first any vulnerability found in Tor by ... - CSO Australia

Nieuws verzameld via Google - to, 12/05/2016 - 06:39

CSO Australia

Mozilla wants US to disclose to it first any vulnerability found in Tor by ...
CSO Australia
Mozilla is asking the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Washington in the interest of Firefox users to ensure that the government must disclose the vulnerability to it before it is revealed to any other party, as any disclosure without ...

Google Nieuws
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla wants US to disclose to it first any vulnerability found in Tor by ... - PCWorld

Nieuws verzameld via Google - to, 12/05/2016 - 06:37

PCWorld

Mozilla wants US to disclose to it first any vulnerability found in Tor by ...
PCWorld
Mozilla has asked a court that it should be provided information on a vulnerability in the Tor browser ahead of it being provided to a defendant in a lawsuit, as the browser is based in part on Firefox browser code. “At this point, no one (including us ...
Firefox 4.0 for iOS arrives with Today widget integration, Awesomebar, and ...VentureBeat

alle 2 nieuwsartikelen »
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Firefox 49: Mozilla verbessert Anpassbarkeit der Lese-Ansicht - soeren-hentzschel.at

Nieuws verzameld via Google - to, 12/05/2016 - 02:39

soeren-hentzschel.at

Firefox 49: Mozilla verbessert Anpassbarkeit der Lese-Ansicht
soeren-hentzschel.at
Seit Version 38.0.5 besitzt Firefox eine Lese-Ansicht für störungsfreies Lesen von Artikeln. Nachdem diese kürzlich um die Möglichkeit erweitert worden ist, sich Artikel vorlesen zu lassen, wurden nun weitere Möglichkeiten hinzugefügt, die Lese-Ansicht ...

en meer »Google Nieuws
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Advanced Disclosure Needed to Keep Users Secure

Mozilla Blog - to, 12/05/2016 - 01:29

User security is paramount. Vulnerabilities can weaken security and ultimately harm users. We want people who identify security vulnerabilities in our products to disclose them to us so we can fix them as soon as possible. That’s why we were one of the first companies to create a bug bounty program and that’s why we are taking action again – to get information that would allow us to fix a potential vulnerability before it is more widely disclosed.

Today, we filed a brief in an ongoing criminal case asking the court to ensure that, if our code is implicated in a security vulnerability, that the government must disclose the vulnerability to us before it is disclosed to any other party. We aren’t taking sides in the case, but we are on the side of the hundreds of millions of users who could benefit from timely disclosure.

The relevant issue in this case relates to a vulnerability allegedly exploited by the government in the Tor Browser. The Tor Browser is partially based on our Firefox browser code. Some have speculated, including members of the defense team, that the vulnerability might exist in the portion of the Firefox browser code relied on by the Tor Browser. At this point, no one (including us) outside the government knows what vulnerability was exploited and whether it resides in any of our code base. The judge in this case ordered the government to disclose the vulnerability to the defense team but not to any of the entities that could actually fix the vulnerability. We don’t believe that this makes sense because it doesn’t allow the vulnerability to be fixed before it is more widely disclosed.

Court ordered disclosure of vulnerabilities should follow the best practice of advance disclosure that is standard in the security research community. In this instance, the judge should require the government to disclose the vulnerability to the affected technology companies first, so it can be patched quickly.

Governments and technology companies both have a role to play in ensuring people’s security online. Disclosing vulnerabilities to technology companies first, allows us to do our job to prevent users from being harmed and to make the Web more secure.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

The Mozilla Blog: Advanced Disclosure Needed to Keep Users Secure

Mozilla planet - to, 12/05/2016 - 01:29

User security is paramount. Vulnerabilities can weaken security and ultimately harm users. We want people who identify security vulnerabilities in our products to disclose them to us so we can fix them as soon as possible. That’s why we were one of the first companies to create a bug bounty program and that’s why we are taking action again – to get information that would allow us to fix a potential vulnerability before it is more widely disclosed.

Today, we filed a brief in an ongoing criminal case asking the court to ensure that, if our code is implicated in a security vulnerability, that the government must disclose the vulnerability to us before it is disclosed to any other party. We aren’t taking sides in the case, but we are on the side of the hundreds of millions of users who could benefit from timely disclosure.

The relevant issue in this case relates to a vulnerability allegedly exploited by the government in the Tor Browser. The Tor Browser is partially based on our Firefox browser code. Some have speculated, including members of the defense team, that the vulnerability might exist in the portion of the Firefox browser code relied on by the Tor Browser. At this point, no one (including us) outside the government knows what vulnerability was exploited and whether it resides in any of our code base. The judge in this case ordered the government to disclose the vulnerability to the defense team but not to any of the entities that could actually fix the vulnerability. We don’t believe that this makes sense because it doesn’t allow the vulnerability to be fixed before it is more widely disclosed.

Court ordered disclosure of vulnerabilities should follow the best practice of advance disclosure that is standard in the security research community. In this instance, the judge should require the government to disclose the vulnerability to the affected technology companies first, so it can be patched quickly.

Governments and technology companies both have a role to play in ensuring people’s security online. Disclosing vulnerabilities to technology companies first, allows us to do our job to prevent users from being harmed and to make the Web more secure.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Selena Deckelmann: TaskCluster Platform Team: Q1 retrospective

Mozilla planet - to, 12/05/2016 - 00:20

TaskCluster Platform team did a lot of foundational work in Q1, to set the stage for some aggressive goals in Q2 around landing new OS support and migrating as fast as we can out of Buildbot.

The two big categories of work we had were “Moving Forward” — things that move TaskCluster forward in terms of developing our team and adding cool features, and “Paying debt” — upgrading infra, improving security, cleaning up code, improving existing interfaces and spinning out code into separate libraries where we can.

As you’ll see, there’s quite a lot of maintenance that goes into our services at this point. There’s probably some overlap of features in the “paying debt” section. Despite a little bit of fuzzyness in the definitions, I think this is an interesting way to examine our work, and a way for us to prioritize features that eliminate certain classes of unpleasant debt paying work. I’m planning to do a similar retrospective for Q2 in July.

I’m quite proud of the foundational work we did on taskcluster-worker, and it’s already paying off in rapid progress with OS X support on hardware in Q2. We’re making fairly good progress on Windows in AWS as well, but we had to pay down years of technical debt around Windows configuration to get our builds running in TaskCluster. Making a choice on our monitoring systems was also a huge win, paying off in much better dashboarding and attention to metrics across services. We’re also excited to have shipped the “Big Graph Scheduler”, which enables cross-graph dependencies and arbitrarily large task graphs (previous graphs were limited to about 1300 tasks). Our team also grew by 2 people – we added Dustin Mitchell, who will continue to do all kinds of work around our systems, focus on security-related issues and will ship a new intree configuration in Q2, and Eli Perelman, who will focus on front end concerns.

The TaskCluster Platform team put the following list together at the start of Q2.

Moving forward:

  • Kicked off and made excellent progress on the taskcluster-worker, a new worker with more robust abstractions and our path forward for worker support on hardware and AWS (the OS X worker implementation currently in testing uses this)
  • Shipped task.dependencies in the queue and will be shipping the rest of the “big graph scheduler” changes just in time to support some massive release promotion graphs
  • Deployed the first sketch for monitoring dashboard
  • Shipped login v3 (welcome, dustin!)
  • Rewrote and tested a new method for mirroring data between AWS regions (cloud-mirror)
  • Researched a monitoring solution and made a plan for Q2 rollout of signalFX
  • Prototyped and deployed aggregation service: statsum (and client for node.js)
  • Contributed to upstream open source tools and libraries in golang and node ecosystem
  • Brought bstack and rthijssen up to speed, brought Dustin onboard!
  • Working with both GSoC and Outreachy, and Mozilla’s University recruiting to bring five interns into our team in Q2/Q3

Paying debt:

  • Shipped better error messages related to schema violations
  • Rolled out formalization of error messages: {code: “…”, message: “…”, details: {…}}
  • Sentry integration — you see an 5xx error with an incidentId, we see it too!
  • Automatic creation of sentry projects, and rotation of credentials
  • go-got — simple HTTP client for go with automatic retries
  • queue.listArtifacts now takes a continuationToken for paging
  • queue.listTaskGroup refactored for correctness (also returns more information)
  • Pre-compilation of queue, index and aws-provisioner with babel-compile (no longer using babel-node)
  • One-click loaners, (related work by armenzg and jmaher to make loaners awesome: instructions + special start mode)
  • Various UI improvements to tools.taskcluster.net (react.js upgrade, favicons, auth tools, login-flow, status, previous taskIds, more)
  • Upgrade libraries for taskcluster-index (new config loader, component loader)
  • Fixed stateless-dns case-sensitivity (livelogs works with DNS resolvers from Germans ISPs too)
  • Further greening of travis for our repositories
  • Better error messages for insufficient scope errors
  • Upgraded heroku stack for events.taskcluster.net (pulse -> websocket bridge)
  • Various fixes to automatic retries in go code (httpbackoff, proxy in docker-worker, taskcluster-client-go)
  • Moved towards shrinkwrapping all of the node services (integrity checks for packages)
  • Added worker level timestamps to task logs
  • Added metrics for docker/task image download and load times
  • Added artifact expiration error handling and saner default values in docker-worker
  • Made a version jump from docker 1.6 to 1.10 in production (included version upgrades of packages and kernel, refactoring of some existing logic)
  • Improved taskcluster and treeherder integration (retrigger errors, prep for offloading resultset creation to TH)
  • Rolling out temp credential support in docker-worker
  • Added mach support for downloading task image for local development
  • Client support for temp credentials in go and java client
  • JSON schema cleanups
  • CI cleanup (all green) and turning off circle CI
  • Enhancements to jsonschema2go
  • Windows build work by rob and pete for getting windows builds migrated off Buildbot
  • Added stability levels to APIs
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla Thunderbird 45.1.0 Released for GNU/Linux, Windows, and Mac OS X - Softpedia News

Nieuws verzameld via Google - wo, 11/05/2016 - 23:25

Softpedia News

Mozilla Thunderbird 45.1.0 Released for GNU/Linux, Windows, and Mac OS X
Softpedia News
Today, May 11, 2016, Mozilla quietly pushed the first maintenance version of the Mozilla Thunderbird 45 email, news, and calendar client to users of Linux, OS X, and Windows operating systems. Mozilla Thunderbird 45.1.0 arrives exactly one month after ...

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla veröffentlicht Firefox 4.0 für Apple iOS - soeren-hentzschel.at

Nieuws verzameld via Google - wo, 11/05/2016 - 22:34

soeren-hentzschel.at

Mozilla veröffentlicht Firefox 4.0 für Apple iOS
soeren-hentzschel.at
Mozilla hat Firefox 4.0 für Apple iOS veröffentlicht. Die neue Version bringt unter anderem eine intelligentere Adressleiste, Unterstützung für das Heute-Widget sowie die Möglichkeit, Zertifikatsfehler zu ignorieren, und steht ab sofort zum Download ...

Google Nieuws
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

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