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Mozilla 1024-Bit Cert Deprecation Leaves 107000 Sites Untrusted - Threatpost

Nieuws verzameld via Google - fr, 05/09/2014 - 22:20

Mozilla 1024-Bit Cert Deprecation Leaves 107000 Sites Untrusted
Threatpost
When Firefox 32 shipped this week, Mozilla also officially ended its support of 1024-bit certificate authority certificates in its trusted store. While it still takes a considerable amount of resources to factor and crack a 1024-bit RSA key, important ...

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Gregory Szorc: Reproducing Mozilla's Mercurial Server

Mozilla planet - fr, 05/09/2014 - 16:50

Of of my first tasks in my new role as a Developer Productivity Engineer is to help make Mozilla's Mercurial server better. Many of the awesome things we have planned rely on features in newer versions of Mercurial. It's therefore important for us to upgrade our Mercurial server to a modern version (we are currently running 2.5.4) and to keep our Mercurial server upgraded as time passes.

There are a few reasons why we haven't historically upgraded our Mercurial server. First, as anyone who has maintained high-availability systems will tell you, there is the attitude of if it isn't broken, don't fix it. In other words, Mercurial 2.5.4 is working fine, so why mess with a good thing. This was all fine and dandy - until Mercurial started falling over in the last few weeks.

But the blocker towards upgrading that I want to talk about today is systems verification. There has been extreme caution around upgrading Mercurial at Mozilla because it is a critical piece of Mozilla's infrastructure and if the upgrade were to not go well, the outage would be disastrous for developer productivity and could even jeopardize an emergency Firefox release.

As much as I'd like to say that a modern version of Mercurial on the server would be a drop-in replacement (Mercurial has a great committment to backwards compatibility and has loose coupling between clients and servers such that upgrading servers should not impact clients), there is always a risk that something will change. And that risk is compounded by the amount of custom code we have running on our server.

The way you protect against unexpected changes is testing. In the ideal world, you have a robust test suite that you run against a staging instance of a service to validate that any changes have no impact. In the absence of testing, you are left with fear, uncertainty, and doubt. FUD is an especially horrible philosophy when it comes to managing servers.

Unfortunately, we don't really have a great testing infrastructure for Mozilla's Mercurial server. And I want to change that.

Reproducing the Server Environment

When writing tests, it is important for the thing being tested to be as similar as possible to the real thing. This is why so many people have an aversion to mocking: every time you alter the test environment, you run the risk that those differences from reality will mask changes seen in the real environment.

So, it makes sense that a good first goal for creating a test suite against our Mercurial server should be to reproduce the production server and environment as closely as possible.

I'm currently working on a Vagrant environment that attempts to reproduce the official environment as closely as possible. It starts one virtual machine for the SSH/master server. It starts a separate virtual machine for the hgweb/slave servers. The virtual machines are booting CentOS. This is different than production, where we run RHEL. But they are similar enough (and can share the same packages) that the differences shouldn't matter too much, at least for now.

Using Puppet

In production, Mozilla is using Puppet to manage the Mercurial servers. Unfortunately, the actual Puppet configs that Mozilla is running are behind a firewall, mainly for security reasons. This is potentially a huge setback for my reproducibility effort, as I'd like to have my virtual machines use the same exact Puppet configs as whats used in production so the environments match as closely as possible. This would also save me a lot of work from having to reinvent the wheel.

Fortunately, Ben Kero has extracted the Mercurial-relevant Puppet config files into a standalone repository. Apparently that repository gets rolled into the production Puppet configs periodically. So, my virtual machines and production can share the same Mercurial Puppet files. Nice!

It wasn't long after starting to use the standalone Puppet configs that I realized this would be a rabbit hole. This first manifests in the standalone Puppet code referencing things that exist in the hidden Mozilla Puppet files. So the liberation was only partially successful. Sad panda.

So, I'm now in the process of creating a fake Mozilla Puppet environment that mimics the base Mozilla environment (from the closed repo) and am modifying the shared Puppet Mercurial code to work with both versions. This is a royal pain, but it needs to be done if we want to reproduce production and maintain peace of mind that test results reflect reality.

Because reproducing runtime environments is important for reproducing and solving bugs and for testing, I call on the maintainers of Mozilla's closed Puppet repository to liberate it from behind its firewall. I'd like to see a public Puppet configuration tree available for all to use so that anyone anywhere can reproduce the state of a server or service operated by Mozilla to within reasonable approximation. Had this already been done, it would have saved me hours of work. As it stands, I'm reverse engineering systems and trying to cobble together understanding of how the Mozilla Puppet configs work and what parts of them can safely be ignored to reproduce an approximate testing environment.

Along that vein, I finally got access to Mozilla's internal Puppet repository. This took a few meetings and apparently a lot of backroom chatter was generated - "developer's don't normally get access, oh my!" All I wanted was to see how systems are configured so I can help improve them. Instead, getting access felt like pulling teeth. This feels like a major roadblock towards productivity, reproducibility, and testing.

Facebook gives its developers access to most production machines and trusts them to not be stupid. I know we (Mozilla) like to hold ourselves to a high standard of security and privacy. But not giving developers access to the configurations for the systems their code runs on feels like a very silly policy. I hope Mozilla invests in opening up this important code and data, if not to the world, at least to its trusted employees.

Anyway, hopefully I'll soon have a Vagrant environment that allows people to build a standalone instance of Mozilla's Mercurial server. And once that's in place, I can start writing tests that basic services and workflows (including repository syncing) work as expected. Stay tuned.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Christian Heilmann: Coldfrontconf is one to watch

Mozilla planet - fr, 05/09/2014 - 13:40

I’ve said it before and I stick by it: conferences stand and fall with the enthusiasm of the organisers. And it is a joy for someone like me who does spend a lot of time at conferences to see a new one be a massive success from the get-go.

Yesterday was the Coldfront conference in Copenhagen, Denmark. A one day conference organised by Kenneth Auchenberg, @Danielovich (and of course a well-chosen team of people). It was very rewarding to work with him to give the closing keynote of the inaugural edition of this event.

The slides of my closing keynotes are available on Slideshare.

And, amazingly enough, the video is out, too:


Chris alt Coldfrontconf
(Notice the fan behind me giving me that wind-swept look that so fitted my physical state going directly from the plane to the venue)

I am sad that because of other commitments I had to miss the first talks, but here are my main impressions of the event:

  • I love the pragmatism of it – one track, good break times, a very simple and straight-forward web site and no push to “download the app of this event”.
  • The location – a program cinema – had great seating, working WiFi (with a few hickups but the hotel next door also had available WiFi that worked in the first rows) and very adequate facilities.
  • The projector and audio set up was great and the switch from speaker to speaker worked flawlessly.
  • All talks were streamed on the web
  • Even a last minute speaker cancellation didn’t quite disturb the event (thanks for the reminder Steen H. Rasmussen)
  • Instead of keeping people perched up inside, the breaks had coffee available for self-service and the food and branded ice cream was served outside the building in the street. This was also the spot for the beers and cupcakes after the event and the final venue was just down the road.
  • The after party was in a beer place that has over 40 beers on tab and the open bar lasted well till after midnight. Nobody got blindly drunk or misbehaved – it actually felt more like a beer tasting experience than a drink-up. There was a lot of seating and no loud music to discourage or hinder communication after party
  • All the videos of the talks were already available on the day or the day after. I managed to see myself whilst my head was still hurting from the party (and my lack of sleep) the night before.
  • Elisabeth Irgens did a great job doing live sketch notes of each talk and uploading them immediately to Twitter.
  • The audience was very well behaved and it was a very inviting and inspiring environment to share information in. Good mix of people with various backgrounds.
  • Whilst there was a bit of sponsorship being shown on the big screen and there were sponsor booths in the foyer all of it was very low-key and appeared utterly in context. No sales weasels or booth babes there. The sponsors sent their geeks to talk to geeks.
  • I felt very well looked after – the organisers paid my flights and hotel and the communication with the speakers as to where to be when was only a handful of emails. Things just fell in place and there was no hesitance to make sure everybody gets there in time.
  • It is very worth while to watch the recordings of the talk. All of them were very high quality. Personally, I was most impressed with Guillermo Rauch“’s How to build the modern, optimistic and reactive user interface, we all want.

All in all, this was a conference that was as pragmatic and spot-on as Kenneth is when you talk to him. It felt very good and I was very much reminded of the first Fronteers event. This is one to watch, let’s see what happens next.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Gregory Szorc: New Job Role

Mozilla planet - fr, 05/09/2014 - 13:30

As of today, I have a new role and title at Mozilla: Developer Productivity Engineer. I'll be reporting to Laura Thomson as a member of the Developer Services team.

I have an immediate goal to make our version control work better. This includes making Try scale and helping out with the deployment of ReviewBoard. After that, I'm not entirely sure. But Autoland and Firefox build system improvements have been discussed.

I'm really excited to be in this new role. If someone were to give me a clean slate and tell me to design my own job role, I think I'd answer with something very similar to the role I am now in. I am passionate about tools and enabling people to become more productive. I have little doubt I'll thrive in this new role.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Christian Heilmann: Firefox OS auf der MobileTechCon Berlin 2014

Mozilla planet - fr, 05/09/2014 - 11:42

Vor zwei Tagen war ich in Berlin auf der MobileTechCon und hielt neben der Eröffnungskeynote am zweiten Tag auch einen Vortrag über den aktuellen Stand von Firefox OS.

Geschätlich in Berlin

Da das Publikum den Vortrag gerne auf Deutsch haben wollte, hatte ich kurzfristig umgeschwenkt und ihn dann auf sowas wie Deutsch gehalten.

Hier sind die Slides und die Screencasts. Der erste ist nur vom Vortrag, der zweite beinhaltet auch die Fragen und Antworten mit ein paar Beispielen wie man zum Beispiel die Developer Tools im Firefox verwenden kann, was together.js ist und wozu das gut ist und ein paar weitere “Schmankerln des offenen Netzes”.

Das alles is sehr ungeschnitten und war mehr oder minder im Moment geändert, daher kann es sein das da auch ungezogene Worte mit dabei sind. Die Slides sind auf Slideshare erhältlich.

Den halbstündigen Vortrag gibt es hier als Screencast zu sehen:

Wer den ganzen Vortrag mit Fragen und Antworten hören will, gibt es hier die ganze Stunde als Screencast.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

John O'Duinn: “xkcd: vol.0″ by Randall Munroe

Mozilla planet - fr, 05/09/2014 - 11:30

“xkcd: volume 0” by Randall Munroe

What can I say? After all the years of reading xkcd.com, buying the book seemed like an obvious “huh, how did I not buy this already” moment.

This was a great wander down memory lane. I found a great many of my favorite xkcd comics, including bobby-drop-tables (therapeutic for anyone with an apostrophe in their surname!), locked-out-of-house, i’m-compiling-code and “the one that makes every Release Engineer I know cringe“.

Somehow, there were even some I’d never seen before, a very happy discovery: chess-coaster (which in turn inspired real life http://xkcd.com/chesscoaster!), the why-i’m-barred-from-speaking-at-crypto-conferences series, girls-on-the-internet, ninjas-vs-stallman, counting sheep

All in all, a great fun read, and I found the “extra” sidebar cartoons equally fun… especially the yakshaver! If you like xkcd, and don’t already have this book, go get it.

ps: He’s got a new book coming out in a few days, a book tour in progress, and a really subtle turtles-all-the-way-down comic which nudges about the new book… if you look *really* closely! I’m looking forward to getting my hands on it!

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Jason Orendorff: Road-Test sending video to Chromecast and Roku in Firefox for Android Beta

Mozilla planet - fr, 05/09/2014 - 02:05

We have been working hard to develop initial multi-screen capabilities within Firefox for Android Beta. Now, supported video content from Web pages you visit can be sent to and viewed on a second screen, with a new ‘send to device’ video sending feature. This feature is now available for testing.

Users now have even more control over their Web experience and can enhance the way they view video content by sending it to a larger screen. They can play, pause and close videos directly from within Firefox for Android via the Media Control Bar, which appears at the bottom of the phone’s screen when a video is being sent to a device. The Media Control Bar will stay visible as long as the video is playing, even as you change tabs or visit new Web pages.

To help users identify that the video they are watching in Firefox for Android can be sent to their connected media streaming device, a ‘send to’ indicator will appear (after any ads have finished) on the playback controls bar for the video.

Clicking this indicator will bring up a list of connected streaming media devices. Users can then select the device they want to send the video to for viewing on a big screen. A second ‘send to’ indicator will then appear in the URL bar to remind users that content from this Web page is being sent to a device.

URL bar showing ‘send to’ indicator in right-hand corner

URL bar showing ‘send to’ indicator in right-hand corner

How to Get Started
To test this feature on Roku or Chromecast, follow these simple instructions:

1. Install Firefox for Android Beta if you haven’t already.
2. Make sure Roku or Chromecast is set-up on a nearby TV and is running on the same WiFi network as your Android phone.
3. If streaming to a Roku, add the Firefox channel to the channel list – instructions from Roku on how to add a new channel are here
4. Go to a site like CNN.com and look for a video on the homepage. Once you start playing a supported video (after any ads have finished playing), the above ‘send to’ icon will appear over the video controls indicating that it can be sent to a nearby streaming device.
5. You can send the video you are watching to a nearby media streaming device by tapping on the video and selecting ‘send to’ from the video controls or touching the ‘send-to’ icon in the URL bar. Both actions will automatically launch the Firefox channel on Roku or activate Chromecast for streaming and send the video to a nearby TV.

NOTES:

  • So long as the device receiving the video supports the same video format being viewed on Firefox for Android (e.g. MP4 for Roku), it will play.
  • Some websites hide or customize the HTML5 video controls and some override the video playback menu too. This can make sending a video to a compatible device like Roku a little tricky, but the simple fallback is to start playing the video in the web page. If the video is in MP4 format and Firefox for Android Beta can find your Roku, a “send to device” indicator will appear in the URL Bar. Just tap on that to send the video to your Roku.

Support for sending videos to compatible devices like Roku and Chromecast is currently in pre-release. We need your help to test this exciting new feature. Please do remember to share your feedback and file any bugs. Happy testing!

For more information:

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Road-Test sending video to Chromecast and Roku in Firefox for Android Beta

Mozilla Futurereleases - fr, 05/09/2014 - 02:05

We have been working hard to develop initial multi-screen capabilities within Firefox for Android Beta. Now, supported video content from Web pages you visit can be sent to and viewed on a second screen, with a new ‘send to device’ video sending feature. This feature is now available for testing.

Users now have even more control over their Web experience and can enhance the way they view video content by sending it to a larger screen. They can play, pause and close videos directly from within Firefox for Android via the Media Control Bar, which appears at the bottom of the phone’s screen when a video is being sent to a device. The Media Control Bar will stay visible as long as the video is playing, even as you change tabs or visit new Web pages.

To help users identify that the video they are watching in Firefox for Android can be sent to their connected media streaming device, a ‘send to’ indicator will appear (after any ads have finished) on the playback controls bar for the video.

Clicking this indicator will bring up a list of connected streaming media devices. Users can then select the device they want to send the video to for viewing on a big screen. A second ‘send to’ indicator will then appear in the URL bar to remind users that content from this Web page is being sent to a device.

URL bar showing ‘send to’ indicator in right-hand corner

URL bar showing ‘send to’ indicator in right-hand corner

How to Get Started
To test this feature on Roku or Chromecast, follow these simple instructions:

1. Install Firefox for Android Beta if you haven’t already.
2. Make sure Roku or Chromecast is set-up on a nearby TV and is running on the same WiFi network as your Android phone.
3. If streaming to a Roku, add the Firefox channel to the channel list – instructions from Roku on how to add a new channel are here
4. Go to a site like CNN.com and look for a video on the homepage. Once you start playing a supported video (after any ads have finished playing), the above ‘send to’ icon will appear over the video controls indicating that it can be sent to a nearby streaming device.
5. You can send the video you are watching to a nearby media streaming device by tapping on the video and selecting ‘send to’ from the video controls or touching the ‘send-to’ icon in the URL bar. Both actions will automatically launch the Firefox channel on Roku or activate Chromecast for streaming and send the video to a nearby TV.

NOTES:

  • So long as the device receiving the video supports the same video format being viewed on Firefox for Android (e.g. MP4 for Roku), it will play.
  • Some websites hide or customize the HTML5 video controls and some override the video playback menu too. This can make sending a video to a compatible device like Roku a little tricky, but the simple fallback is to start playing the video in the web page. If the video is in MP4 format and Firefox for Android Beta can find your Roku, a “send to device” indicator will appear in the URL Bar. Just tap on that to send the video to your Roku.

Support for sending videos to compatible devices like Roku and Chromecast is currently in pre-release. We need your help to test this exciting new feature. Please do remember to share your feedback and file any bugs. Happy testing!

For more information:

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mark Côté: Review Board preview

Mozilla planet - fr, 05/09/2014 - 02:02

I know lots of people are very anxious to see Mozilla’s new code-review tool. It’s been a harrowing journey, but we are finally knocking out our last few blockers for initial deployment (see tracking bug 1021929). While we sort those out, here’s something to whet your palate: a walk through the new review work flow.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla Open Policy & Advocacy Blog: A Day of Action to Protect Net Neutrality

Mozilla planet - fr, 05/09/2014 - 01:25

Next Wednesday, a number of organizations and tech companies are rallying together for a Day of Action to protect net neutrality. Mozilla is proud to join the effort.

Protecting net neutrality is a top priority for Mozilla. We believe that regardless of who is sending and receiving it, ISPs treating data equally is vital to a healthy, vibrant and open Web. During the Day of Action, we will encourage the Mozilla community to amplify its voice and send a clear message to the U.S. Congress about what is at stake if net neutrality is weakened.

In advance of the Day of Action, we will also host a reddit AMA to raise awareness and understanding of the issue so people can take informed action. Please join us in the AMA on Tuesday, September 9, from 12-1pm PT by visiting https://www.reddit.com/r/IAmA/.

This is a critical time in the evolution of the Web. Decisions about net neutrality will determine whether the Web continues to be a powerful, shared resource for innovation, opportunity and learning. A long-awaited decision from the FCC is imminent, so let’s join together to send a strong message to policy makers: Protect Net Neutrality.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Luis Villa: My Wikimania 2014 talks

Mozilla planet - to, 04/09/2014 - 21:06

Primarily what I did during Wikimania was chew on pens.

Discussing Fluid Lobbying at Wikimania 2014, by  Sebastiaan ter Burg, under CC BY 2.0
Discussing Fluid Lobbying at Wikimania 2014, by Sebastiaan ter Burg, under CC BY 2.0

However, I also gave some talks.

The first one was on Creative Commons 4.0, with Kat Walsh. While targeted at Wikimedians, this may be of interest to others who want to learn about CC 4.0 as well.

Second one was on Open Source Hygiene, with Stephen LaPorte. This one is again Wikimedia-specific (and I’m afraid less useful without the speaker notes) but may be of interest to open source developers more generally.

The final one was on sharing; video is below (and I’ll share the slides once I figure out how best to embed the notes, which are pretty key to understanding the slides):

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

eBay, Kickstarter and Mozilla join internet slowdown day - Inquirer

Nieuws verzameld via Google - to, 04/09/2014 - 18:37

SFGate

eBay, Kickstarter and Mozilla join internet slowdown day
Inquirer
INTERNET HEAVYWEIGHTS including eBay, Kickstarter and Mozilla are joining in a day of action to campaign for the preservation of net neutrality. Major websites including Etsy, Kickstarter, Foursquare, Wordpress, Vimeo, Reddit, Mozilla, Imgur, Meetup, ...
Large US tech firms plan 'go slow' day in protest over net neutrality rulesThe Guardian
Mozilla, Reddit, And Other Popular Sites Plan 'Go Slow' Day To Protest Net ...Hot Hardware
Your Favorite Websites Are Protesting Against Internet 'Slow Lanes'TIME
RT -Heavy.com -Mediaite
alle 60 nieuwsartikelen »
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Search engine giant Mozilla Firefox launches Welsh language version for ... - WalesOnline

Nieuws verzameld via Google - to, 04/09/2014 - 18:13

WalesOnline

Search engine giant Mozilla Firefox launches Welsh language version for ...
WalesOnline
The Welsh language just got even more hi-tech, global and portable – after of the World's most popular search engines launched a Welsh version of its browser for smartphone users. Mozilla Firefox, used by around 20% of web users around the world has ...
New Mozilla Firefox OS designed for smart gadgetsStixs News

alle 2 nieuwsartikelen »
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Sean Martell: Mozilla ID Project: Logo Exploration and Pitch Interactive

Mozilla planet - to, 04/09/2014 - 17:44

Now that we’re well underway in the brand exploration project, we’re starting to see some fun and exciting ideas unfold visually thanks to a partnership Creative has with the amazing Pitch Interactive.

It’s awesome to see just how much Pitch understands what we’re trying to achieve and their level of energy for making this a reality matches ours perfectly. Their experience with illustration and data visualization has us super excited to team up and make this living brand the fingerprint Mozilla needs to represent our amazing, diverse organization.

As an amazing example of what the potential is, please check out one of their portfolio pieces for McKnight Artist Fellows. Those individual artist illustrations use data from their career and form stunning interactive visuals using Web technologies. Exciting stuff!

If you’ve been following along, you’ve seen my first two live stream sessions where I’ve been dreaming up potential directions for our logo. Using those directions, Pitch has started looking into what data we can use from within Mozilla and how it could be visualized using HTML5/CSS/JS as an “of the web” logo for us.

pitch-1

A sampling of the various visual styles being explored by Pitch Interactive

We’ve received several mockup visual routes we could take and we’d like to share a small sampling of what they’ve been dreaming up on their end, to keep this process as open as possible. I’ll be taking some of their ideas and playing around with them in the next livestream to build on their vision and see how it could evolve further.

Stay tuned!

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Rubén Martín: Joining Mozilla full time

Mozilla planet - to, 04/09/2014 - 17:00

14596701352_7926cbf2f7_o

I started contributing to Mozilla back in early 2004, when I would have never imagined how my life would be so connected to Mozilla 10 years after.

When you devote so much time of your free time to a project it has to be a reason, and in this case it’s the Mozilla mission and see how you can contribute to change things globally.

If you didn’t know, Mozilla is a global community and a non-profit organization which wants to bring openness and participation to the web thanks to open source products like Firefox web browser, Firefox OS mobile OS and others.

I’ve been involved in a lot of projects these years but there are two that I consider the most important.

The first one is Mozilla Hispano, the Spanish community we founded back in 2007. Being involved in community building efforts and contributor engagement with people from a lot of Spanish speaking countries has been (and is) an awesome experience. It has taught me a lot about how to work in and structure volunteer communities.

The second one is the Mozilla Reps program. When William Quiviger invited me to join the first Council to start the project in 2011, and join the rest of the initial Council in the Paris Work Week, we had no idea about the importance Reps program would have right now.

Guillermo Movia BY-NC-SA 2.0

Initial council work week by Guillermo Movia BY-NC-SA 2.0

I was part of the council till first elections took place and then I’ve been involved as a mentor and also as a Reps module peer, helping and suggesting improvements to the program.

Remo_logo_vertical

Starting in September I’ll be joining the Community Engagement team at Mozilla to work together with Rosana as Community Manager for Mozilla Reps program. This will allow me to devote full time to help improve the program working with Council, Mentors, Reps and the rest of the organization. I’ll be focused on improving tools, processes, metrics and internal communications.

I’ll keep my responsibilities as Mozilla Hispano community member and you shouldn’t expect major changes on my contributions to other Mozilla areas as long as my time allows me ;)

I’m really excited about this change and it’s an honor to work full time on something that enables mozillians to move Mozilla’s mission forward and keep making impact on the web.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Robert Nyman: Who’s your friend on Facebook?

Mozilla planet - to, 04/09/2014 - 11:18

Today when I sent a friend request on Facebook to a person, I was met by a dialog asking if we’re really friends.

This got me thinking about what their motivation for this might be, and my first thoughts were:

  • This means a lot of people are using Facebook “wrong” in their eyes
  • People have gotten tired of tons of friend requests (lucky them)
  • Friend requests is not for making new friends – just nurture existing ones
  • The definition seem to be that you have friends in real life, and digital is only an extension of that
  • The person I sent a friend request to is someone fairly well-known on the tech scene, so maybe it’s some protection against that

Breaking this down:

Doing it wrong?

I both get friend requests from, and send requests to, people who I might not know personally (or in some cases, not at all). And in some cases, these have become the best friends. I’ve gotten to know so many great people and friends through the web/a digital medium – some who I’ve been lucky to then meet in person, some I still haven’t.

It also seems that Facebook has become a sort of Rolodex with connections for people, throughout their life. Almost everyone are on Facebook, some reluctantly, so it is more or less a de facto place to find people, friends long lost and more.

Nurture existing friends

I love making new friends and reconnecting with old ones alike! Given how Facebook begun, and how it has evolved, seems to be that it’s much more a platform of connecting new people than just a connection with close friends (actually, for me, some of my close friends and I have virtually no interaction on Facebook, but rather in other contexts).

And what’s really the definition of “know this person personally”, anyway? That we must have known each other five years? Or met 100 times? Got drunk together? Slept together?

People You May Know

It also doesn’t seem to rhyme well with their People You May Know feature, suggesting mutual friends and more. Sometimes it’s a match, but the majority of the time, they are complete strangers. Only connection is a possible mutual friend.

“Famous”

It could also be that I sent a friend request to someone fairly well-known on the tech scene, but we have 18 mutual friends so it would be fairly ok to assume we have some connection.

Seems to me that a possibility is that famous people have gotten tired of lots of friend requests so it’s a way to keep them in.

Just make friends

To me the Internet is amazing for making new friends, and staying in touch with old ones – especially if there are geographical reasons and similar behind you’re not being able to meet in person – so I’d encourage everyone to keep on using it just like that.

So, who is really your friend on Facebook? Anyone you want!

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Benjamin Kerensa: One Year of Release Management

Mozilla planet - to, 04/09/2014 - 07:16
This month marks my one year anniversary contributing to the Release Management Team as a Early Feedback Community Release Manager and I was not sure how the experience would turn out at first. I have really enjoyed the last 12 months working on our Firefox Nightly release. At our last work week in Portland, one […]
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Jason Orendorff: Help Test Experimental WebRTC Communications Feature in Firefox Beta

Mozilla planet - to, 04/09/2014 - 06:11

With today’s release of Firefox Beta, we are introducing an experimental Web Real Time (WebRTC) communication feature that aims to offer more value to Firefox users and we’re calling for your help to test it out and let us know what you think.

There are a growing number of online communication services which are incompatible with each other, making it hard to communicate with your friends and family who might not have the same service, software or equipment as you. In order to use one of these services, you have to register an account and also give up your personal information in exchange for the right to use the services.

We’ve been testing WebRTC in experimental builds of Firefox for the last few months and today are expanding these trials to Beta to get more user feedback and for load testing purposes. With this WebRTC experiment we’re aiming to simplify video and audio communications by building an integrated communications feature directly into Firefox. It’s free to make voice and video calls and there’s no need to download software, plugins or even create an account, it’s ready to go immediately when you open Firefox Beta.

Mozilla has been pioneering WebRTC in a number of areas, from our industry-first implementation of DataChannels, to the first WebRTC call between two major browsers. With this experiment in Firefox Beta we’re continuing this momentum and increasing the value of WebRTC to Firefox users and developers.

So why not give our experiment a test drive. You’ll notice the product feature identified by a phone icon on the toolbar.

Please remember to share your feedback and file any bugs as we continue to improve performance and features around this WebRTC experiment.

We’ll have more to share as this product feature progresses.

More information:

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Help Test Experimental WebRTC Communications Feature in Firefox Beta

Mozilla Futurereleases - to, 04/09/2014 - 06:11

With today’s release of Firefox Beta, we are introducing an experimental Web Real Time (WebRTC) communication feature that aims to offer more value to Firefox users and we’re calling for your help to test it out and let us know what you think.

There are a growing number of online communication services which are incompatible with each other, making it hard to communicate with your friends and family who might not have the same service, software or equipment as you. In order to use one of these services, you have to register an account and also give up your personal information in exchange for the right to use the services.

We’ve been testing WebRTC in experimental builds of Firefox for the last few months and today are expanding these trials to Beta to get more user feedback and for load testing purposes. With this WebRTC experiment we’re aiming to simplify video and audio communications by building an integrated communications feature directly into Firefox. It’s free to make voice and video calls and there’s no need to download software, plugins or even create an account, it’s ready to go immediately when you open Firefox Beta.

Mozilla has been pioneering WebRTC in a number of areas, from our industry-first implementation of DataChannels, to the first WebRTC call between two major browsers. With this experiment in Firefox Beta we’re continuing this momentum and increasing the value of WebRTC to Firefox users and developers.

So why not give our experiment a test drive by following these instructions. You’ll notice the product feature identified by a speech bubble, is located under the Firefox menu under the ‘customize’ option, as there’s still a lot of work to be done before we make it available to our wider audience

Please remember to share your feedback and file any bugs as we continue to improve performance and features around this WebRTC experiment.

We’ll have more to share as this product feature progresses.

More information:

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Jason Orendorff: New Tab Page Experiments in Firefox Beta

Mozilla planet - to, 04/09/2014 - 06:09

Back in May, I let you know that we were running some experiments with the new tab page. I wanted to share a quick update on our progress and thinking as we expand testing to Firefox Beta.

We’ve learned a lot. We’ve experimented with every part of the new tab page – the size, layout, number of tiles, their UI, as well as varying the kinds of content we show. We’ve seen that some tiles don’t work at all, and some tiles get 50x the interaction we’d expect from industry benchmarks. We measure those interactions because we think they’re a proxy for giving users something valuable.

We’re really excited about the good stuff we can bring to users by working more closely with content providers and leading by example. This is new terrain for us, though, so we’re being deliberate about testing as we go.

Our next step is to extend these tests to the Firefox Beta channel, starting with our English locales. Our early results are promising, and we’ll keep measuring and refining until we’ve got it right.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

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