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Air Mozilla: Reps weekly, 22 Sep 2016

Mozilla planet - to, 22/09/2016 - 18:00

Reps weekly This is a weekly call with some of the Reps to discuss all matters about/affecting Reps and invite Reps to share their work with everyone.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Firefox Nightly: These Weeks in Firefox: Issue 1

Mozilla planet - to, 22/09/2016 - 16:36

Every two weeks, engineering teams working on Firefox Desktop get together and update each other on things that they’re working on. These meetings are public. Details on how to join, as well as meeting notes, are available here.

We feel that the bleeding edge development state captured in those meeting notes might be interesting to our Nightly blog audience. To that end, we’re taking a page out of the Rust and Servo playbook, and offering you handpicked updates about what’s going on at the forefront of Firefox development!

Expect these every two weeks or so.

Thanks for using Nightly, and keep on rocking the free web!

Highlights Contributor(s) of the Week
  • The team has nominated Adam (adamgj.wong), who has helped clean-up some of our Telemetry APIs. Great work, Adam!
Project Updates

 

Add-ons
  • andym wants to remind everybody that the Add-ons team is still triaging and fixing SDK bugs (like this one, for example).
Electrolysis (e10s) Core Engineering
  • ksteuber rewrote the Snappy Symbolication Server (mainly used for the Gecko Profiler for Windows builds) and this will be deployed soon.
  • felipe is in the process of designing experiment mechanisms for testing different behaviours for Flash (allowing some, denying some, click-to-play some, based on heuristics)
Platform UI and other Platform Audibles Quality of Experience Sync / Firefox Accounts Uncategorized

Here are the raw meeting notes that were used to derive this list.

Want to help us build Firefox? Get started here!

Here’s a tool to find some mentored, good first bugs to hack on.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Air Mozilla: Meeting OW2 - Day 2

Mozilla planet - to, 22/09/2016 - 09:30

Meeting OW2 - Day 2 Meeting OW2

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Air Mozilla: Privacy Lab - September 2016 - EU Privacy Panel

Mozilla planet - to, 22/09/2016 - 03:15

Privacy Lab - September 2016 - EU Privacy Panel Want to learn more about EU Privacy? Join us for a lively panel discussion of EU Privacy, including GDPR, Privacy Shield, Brexit and more. After...

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla Gets Rid of Firefox Hello in Firefox 49 - eWeek

Nieuws verzameld via Google - wo, 21/09/2016 - 23:23

eWeek

Mozilla Gets Rid of Firefox Hello in Firefox 49
eWeek
In October 2014, as part of the Firefox 34 beta release, Mozilla introduced its Firefox Hello communications technology enabling users to make calls directly from the browser. On Sept. 20, 2016, Mozilla formally removed support for Firefox Hello as ...
Bug that hit Firefox and Tor browsers was hard to spot—now we know whyArs Technica

alle 2 nieuwsartikelen »Google Nieuws
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Software-update: Mozilla Firefox 49.0 - Tweakers

Nieuws verzameld via Google - wo, 21/09/2016 - 22:31

Tweakers

Software-update: Mozilla Firefox 49.0
Tweakers
Mozilla Firefox 2013 logo (75 pix) Mozilla heeft versie 49 van zijn webbrowser Firefox uitgebracht. In versie 49 is onder meer de login manager aangepast, zodat deze nu gegevens die voor een onbeveiligde http-verbinding zijn opgeslagen kan gebruiken ...

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

About:Community: One Mozilla Clubs

Mozilla planet - wo, 21/09/2016 - 21:05

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In 2015, The Mozilla Foundation launched the Mozilla Clubs program to bring people together locally to teach, protect and build the open web in an engaging and collaborative way. Within a year it grew to include 240+ Clubs in 100+ cities globally, and now is growing to reach new communities around the world.

Today we are excited to share a new focus for Mozilla Clubs taking place on a University or College Campus (Campus Clubs). Mozilla Campus Clubs blend the passion and student focus of the former Firefox Student Ambassador program and Take Back The Web Campaign with the existing structure of  Mozilla Clubs to create a unified model for participation on campuses!

Mozilla Campus Clubs take advantage of the unique learning environments of Universities and Colleges to bring groups of students together to teach, build and protect the open web. It builds upon the Mozilla Club framework to provide targeted support to those on campus through its:

  1. Structure:  Campus Clubs include an Executive Team in addition to the Club Captain position, who help develop programs and run activities specific to the 3 impact areas (teach, build, protect).
  2. Training & Support: Like all Mozilla Clubs, Regional Coordinators and Club Captains receive training and mentorship throughout their clubs journey. However the nature of the training and support for Campus Clubs is specific to helping students navigate the challenges of setting up and running a club in the campus context.
  3. Activities: Campus Club activities are structured around 3 impact areas (teach, build, protect). Club Captains in a University or College can find suggested activities (some specific to students) on the website here.

These clubs will be connected to the larger Mozilla Club network to share resources, curriculum, mentorship and support with others around the world. In 2017 you’ll see additional unification in terms of a joint application process for all Regional Coordinators and a unified web presence.

This is an exciting time for us to unite our network of passionate contributors and create new opportunities for collaboration, learning, and growth within our Mozillian communities. We also see the potential of this unification to allow for greater impact across Mozilla’s global programs, projects and initiatives.

If you’re currently involved in Mozilla Clubs and/or the FSA program, here are some important things to know:

  • The Firefox Student Ambassador Program is now Mozilla Campus Clubs: After many months of hard work and careful planning the Firefox Ambassador Program (FSA) has officially transitioned to Mozilla Clubs as of Monday September 19th, 2016. For full details about the Firefox Student Ambassador transition check out this guide here.
  • Firefox Club Captains will now be Mozilla Club Captains: Firefox Club Captains who already have a club, a structure, and a community set up on a university/college should register your club here to be partnered with a Regional Coordinator and have access to new resources and opportunities, more details are here.
  • Current Mozilla Clubs will stay the same: Any Mozilla Club that already exists will stay the same. If they happen to be on a university or college campus Clubs may choose to register as a Campus Club, but are not required to do so.
  • There is a new application for Regional Coordinators (RC’s): Anyone interested in taking on more responsibility within the Clubs program can apply here.  Regional Coordinators mentor Club Captains that are geographically close to them. Regional Coordinators support all Club Captains in their region whether they are on campus or elsewhere.
  • University or College students who want to start a Club at their University and College may apply here. Students who primarily want to lead a club on a campus for/with other university/college students will apply to start a Campus Club.
  • People who want to start a club for any type of learner apply here. Anyone who wants to start a club that is open to all kinds of learners (not limited to specifically University students) may apply to start a Club here.

Individuals who are leading Mozilla Clubs commit to running regular (at least monthly) gatherings, participate in community calls, and contribute resources and learning materials to the community. They are part of a network of leaders and doers who support and challenge each other. By increasing knowledge and skills in local communities Club leaders ensure that the internet is a global public resource, open and accessible to all.

This is the beginning of a long term collaboration for the Mozilla Clubs Program. We are excited to continue to build momentum for Mozilla’s mission through new structures and supports that will help engage more people with a passion for the open web.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Air Mozilla: MozFest Volunteer Meetup - September 21, 2016

Mozilla planet - wo, 21/09/2016 - 20:00

MozFest Volunteer Meetup - September 21, 2016 Meetup for 2016 MozFest Volunteers

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Air Mozilla: The Joy of Coding - Episode 72

Mozilla planet - wo, 21/09/2016 - 19:00

The Joy of Coding - Episode 72 mconley livehacks on real Firefox bugs while thinking aloud.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Air Mozilla: Weekly SUMO Community Meeting Sept 21, 2016

Mozilla planet - wo, 21/09/2016 - 18:00

Weekly SUMO Community Meeting Sept 21, 2016 This is the sumo weekly call

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Julia Vallera: Introducing Mozilla Campus Clubs

Mozilla planet - wo, 21/09/2016 - 17:48

24009148094_d1a1be14ec_k

In 2015, The Mozilla Foundation launched the Mozilla Clubs program to bring people together locally to teach, protect and build the open web in an engaging and collaborative way. Within a year it grew to include 240+ Clubs in 100+ cities globally, and now is growing to reach new communities around the world.

Today we are excited to share a new focus for Mozilla Clubs taking place on a University or College Campus (Campus Clubs). Mozilla Campus Clubs blend the passion and student focus of the former Firefox Student Ambassador program and Take Back The Web Campaign with the existing structure of  Mozilla Clubs to create a unified model for participation on campuses!

Mozilla Campus Clubs take advantage of the unique learning environments of Universities and Colleges to bring groups of students together to teach, build and protect the open web. It builds upon the Mozilla Club framework to provide targeted support to those on campus through its:

  1. Structure:  Campus Clubs include an Executive Team in addition to the Club Captain position, who help develop programs and run activities specific to the 3 impact areas (teach, build, protect).
  2. Specific Training & Support: Like all Mozilla Clubs, Regional Coordinators and Club Captains receive training and mentorship throughout their clubs journey. However the nature of the training and support for Campus Clubs is specific to helping students navigate the challenges of setting up and running a club in the campus context.
  3. Activities: Campus Club activities are structured around 3 impact areas (teach, build, protect). Club Captains in a University or College can find suggested activities (some specific to students) on the website here.

These clubs will be connected to the larger Mozilla Club network to share resources, curriculum, mentorship and support with others around the world. In 2017 you’ll see additional unification in terms of a joint application process for all Club leaders and a unified web presence.

This is an exciting time for us to unite our network of passionate contributors and create new opportunities for collaboration, learning, and growth within our Mozillian communities. We also see the potential of this unification to allow for greater impact across Mozilla’s global programs, projects and initiatives.

If you’re currently involved in Mozilla Clubs and/or the FSA program, here are some important things to know:
  • The Firefox Student Ambassador Program is now Mozilla Campus Clubs: After many months of hard work and careful planning the Firefox Ambassador Program (FSA) has officially transitioned to Mozilla Clubs as of Monday September 19th, 2016. For full details about the Firefox Student Ambassador transition check out this guide here.
  • Firefox Club Captains will now be Mozilla Club Captains: Firefox Club Captains who already have a club, a structure, and a community set up on a university/college should register your club here to be partnered with a Regional Coordinator and have access to new resources and opportunities, more details are here.
  • Current Mozilla Clubs will stay the same: Any Mozilla Club that already exists will stay the same. If they happen to be on a university or college campus Clubs may choose to register as a Campus Club, but are not required to do so.
  • There is a new application for Regional Coordinators (RC’s): Anyone interested in taking on more responsibility within the Clubs program can apply here.  Regional Coordinators mentor Club Captains that are geographically close to them. Regional Coordinators support all Club Captains in their region whether they are on campus or elsewhere.
  • University or College students who want to start a Club at their University and College may apply here. Students who primarily want to lead a club on a campus for/with other university/college students will apply to start a Campus Club.
  • People who want to start a club for any type of learner apply here. Anyone who wants to start a club that is open to all kinds of learners (not limited to specifically University students) may apply on the Mozilla Club website.

Individuals who are leading Mozilla Clubs commit to running regular (at least monthly) gatherings, participate in community calls, and contribute resources and learning materials to the community. They are part of a network of leaders and doers who support and challenge each other. By increasing knowledge and skills in local communities Club leaders ensure that the internet is a global public resource, open and accessible to all.

This is the beginning of a long term collaboration for the Mozilla Clubs Program. We are excited to continue to build momentum for Mozilla’s mission through new structures and supports that will help engage more people with a passion for the open web.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla Patches Certificate Pinning Vulnerability in Firefox - Threatpost

Nieuws verzameld via Google - wo, 21/09/2016 - 14:58

Threatpost

Mozilla Patches Certificate Pinning Vulnerability in Firefox
Threatpost
As expected, Mozilla patched a highly scrutinized flaw in its automated update process for add-ons in Firefox, specifically around the expiration of certificate pins. The vulnerability allowed attackers to intercept encrypted browser traffic, inject a ...
Mozilla slowly grants multi-process Firefox to more usersComputerworld
Mozilla Launches Firefox 49PC Perspective
New Mozilla Firefox Expands Multi-Process Support And MoreGeeky Gadgets
VentureBeat -The Mobile Indian -Softpedia News
alle 26 nieuwsartikelen »
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Apple patcht lekken in iCloud, Safari, macOS en iTunes - Security.nl

Nieuws verzameld via Google - wo, 21/09/2016 - 10:09

Apple patcht lekken in iCloud, Safari, macOS en iTunes
Security.nl
Naast Mozilla en Symantec heeft ook Apple belangrijke beveiligingsupdates voor gebruikers uitgebracht. Zo verscheen er een nieuwe macOS-versie genaamd Sierra. In deze versie van Apples besturingssysteem zijn in totaal 65 kwetsbaarheden gepatcht.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla dicht 18 lekken in Firefox 49, stopt support oude Macs - Security.nl

Nieuws verzameld via Google - wo, 21/09/2016 - 09:36

Mozilla dicht 18 lekken in Firefox 49, stopt support oude Macs
Security.nl
Mozilla heeft een nieuwe versie van Firefox uitgebracht waarin 18 beveiligingslekken zijn gedicht, waarvan vier zo ernstig dat een aanvaller kwetsbare systemen in het ergste geval zou kunnen overnamen als gebruikers een kwaadaardige of gehackte ...

en meer »
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Air Mozilla: Meeting OW2 - Day 1

Mozilla planet - wo, 21/09/2016 - 09:30

Meeting OW2 - Day 1 Meeting OW2

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Andy McKay: System Add-ons

Mozilla planet - wo, 21/09/2016 - 09:00

System add-ons are a new kind of add-on in Firefox, you might also know them as Go Faster add-ons.

These are interesting add-ons, they allow Firefox developers to ship code faster by writing the code in an add-on and then allow that to be developed and shipped independently of the main Firefox code.

Mostly these are not using WebExtensions and there is some questions if they should. I've been thinking about this one for a while and here are my thoughts at the moment - they aren't more than thoughts at this time.

System add-ons are really "internal" pieces of code that would otherwise be shipped in mozilla-central, blessed by the module owner and generally approved. They are maintained by someone who is active involved in their code (usually but not always a Mozilla employee). They have gone through security and privacy reviews. They are tested against Firefox code in the test infrastructure on each release. They sometimes do things that no other add-on should be allowed to do.

This is all in contrast to third party add-ons that you'll find on AMO. When you look through all the reasoning behind WebExtensions, you'll find that a lot of the reasons involve things like "hard to maintain", "security problems" and so on. Please see my earlier posts for more on this. I would say that these reasons don't apply to system add-ons.

So do system add-ons need to be WebExtensions? Maybe they don't. In fact I think if we try and push them into being system add-ons we'll create a scenario where WebExtensions become the blocker.

System add-ons will want to do things that don't exist, so APIs will need to be added to WebExtensions. Some of the things that system add-ons will want to do are things that third party add-ons should not be allowed to do. Then we need to add in another permissions layer to say some add-on developers can use those APIs and others can't.

Already there is a distinction between what can and cannot land in Firefox and that's made by the module owners and people who work on Firefox.

If a system add-on does something unusual, do you end up in a scenario where you write a WebExtension API that only one add-on uses? The maintenance burden of creating an API for one part of Firefox that only one add-on can use doesn't seem worth it. It also makes WebExtensions the blocker and slows system add-on development down.

It feels to me like there isn't a compelling reason to make system add-ons to be WebExtensions. Instead we should encourage them to be so if it makes sense and let them be regular bootstrapped add-ons otherwise.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla slowly grants multi-process Firefox to more users - Computerworld

Nieuws verzameld via Google - ti, 20/09/2016 - 22:13

Computerworld

Mozilla slowly grants multi-process Firefox to more users
Computerworld
Mozilla today upgraded Firefox to version 49, and said it is expanding the pool of users who receive the multiple process browser that started reaching a few customers weeks ago. "In this release, we're expanding support for a small initial set of ...
Mozilla Patching Firefox Certificate Pinning Vulnerability | Threatpost ...Threatpost
Firefox 49 arrives with Reader Mode improvements, offline viewing on Android ...VentureBeat
Mozilla Launches Firefox 49PC Perspective
Softpedia News -BetaNews -Engadget
alle 14 nieuwsartikelen »
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla shortlists four designs in open-source rebrand project - Design Week

Nieuws verzameld via Google - ti, 20/09/2016 - 20:32

Design Week

Mozilla shortlists four designs in open-source rebrand project
Design Week
It is working with design consultancy Johnson Banks on its open-source rebrand project, which has seen it seeking feedback from the Mozilla community and general public through the comments section on the Mozilla blog, social media and live events over ...

Google Nieuws
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

George Wright: An Introduction to Shmem/IPC in Gecko

Mozilla planet - ti, 20/09/2016 - 19:24

We use shared memory (shmem) pretty extensively in the graphics stack in Gecko. Unfortunately, there isn’t a huge amount of documentation regarding how the shmem mechanisms in Gecko work and how they are managed, which I will attempt to address in this post.

Firstly, it’s important to understand how IPC in Gecko works. Gecko uses a language called IPDL to define IPC protocols. This is effectively a description language which formally defines the format of the messages that are passed between IPC actors. The IPDL code is then compiled into C++ code by our IPDL compiler, and we can then use the generated classes in Gecko’s C++ code to do IPC related things. IPDL class names start with a P to indicate that they are IPDL protocol definitions.

IPDL has a built-in shmem type, simply called mozilla::ipc::Shmem. This holds a weak reference to a SharedMemory object, and code in Gecko operates on this. SharedMemory is the underlying platform-specific implementation of shared memory and facilitates the shmem subsystem by implementing the platform-specific API calls to allocate and deallocate shared memory regions, and obtain their handles for use in the different processes. Of particular interest is that on OS X we use the Mach virtual memory system, which uses a Mach port as the handle for the allocated memory regions.

mozilla::ipc::Shmem objects are fully managed by IPDL, and there are two different types: normal Shmem objects, and unsafe Shmem objects. Normal Shmem objects are mostly intended to be used by IPC actors to send large data chunks between themselves as this is more efficient than saturating the IPC channel. They have strict ownership policies which are enforced by IPDL; when the Shmem object is sent across IPC, the sender relinquishes ownership and IPDL restricts the sender’s access rights so that it can neither read nor write to the memory, whilst the receiver gains these rights. These Shmem objects are created/destroyed in C++ by calling PFoo::AllocShmem() and PFoo::DeallocShmem(), where PFoo is the Foo IPDL interface being used. One major caveat of these “safe” shmem regions is that they are not thread safe, so be careful when using them on multiple threads in the same process!

Unsafe Shmem objects are basically a free-for-all in terms of access rights. Both sender and receiver can always read/write to the allocated memory and careful control must be taken to ensure that race conditions are avoided between the processes trying to access the shmem regions. In graphics, we use these unsafe shmem regions extensively, but use locking vigorously to ensure correct access patterns. Unsafe Shmem objects are created by calling PFoo::AllocUnsafeShmem(), but are still destroyed in the same manner as normal Shmem objects by simply calling PFoo::DeallocShmem().

With the work currently ongoing to move our compositor to a separate GPU process, there are some limitations with our current shmem situation. Notably, a SharedMemory object is effectively owned by an IPDL channel, and when the channel goes away, the SharedMemory object backing the Shmem object is deallocated. This poses a problem as we use shmem regions to back our textures, and when/if the GPU process dies, it’d be great to keep the existing textures and simply recreate the process and IPC channel, then continue on like normal. David Anderson is currently exploring a solution to this problem, which will likely be to hold a strong reference to the SharedMemory region in the Shmem object, thus ensuring that the SharedMemory object doesn’t get destroyed underneath us so long as we’re using it in Gecko.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Justin Crawford: Debugging WebExtension Popups

Mozilla planet - ti, 20/09/2016 - 19:08

Note: In the time since I last posted here I have been doing a bit more hands-on web development [for example, on the View Source website]. Naturally this has led me to learn new things. I have learned a few things that may be new to others, too. I’ll drop those here when I run across them.

I have been looking for a practical way to learn about WebExtensions, the new browser add-on API in Firefox. This API is powerful for a couple reasons: It allows add-on developers to build add-ons that work across browsers, and it’s nicer to work with than the prior Firefox add-on API (for example, it watches code and reloads changes without restarting the browser).

So I found a WebExtensions add-on to hack on, which I’ll probably talk about in a later post. The add-on has a chrome component, which is to say it includes changes to the browser UI. Firefox browser chrome is just HTML/CSS/JavaScript, which is great. But it took me a little while to figure out how to debug it.

The tools for doing this are all fairly recent. The WebExtension documentation on MDN is fresh from the oven, and the capabilities shown below were missing just a few months ago.

Here’s how to get started debugging WebExtensions in the browser:

First, enable the Browser Toolbox. This is a special instance of Firefox developer tools that can inspect and debug the browser’s chrome. Cool, eh? Here’s how to make it even cooler:

  • Set up a custom Firefox profile with the Toolbox enabled, so you don’t have to enable it every time you fire up your development environment. Consider just using the DevPrefs add-on, which toggles a variety of preferences (including Toolbox) to optimize the browser for add-on development.
  • Once you have a profile with DevPrefs installed, you can launch it with your WebExtension like so: ./node_modules/.bin/web-ext run --source-dir=src --firefox-binary {path to firefox binary} --firefox-profile {name of custom profile} (See the WebExtensions command reference for more information.

Next, with the instance of Firefox that appears when you run the above command, go to the Tools -> Web Developer -> Browser Toolbox menu. A window should appear that looks just like a standard Firefox developer tools window. But this window is imbued with the amazing ability to debug the browser itself. Try it: Use the inspector to look at the back button!

browser_toolbox

In that window you’ll see a couple small icons near the top right. One looks like a waffle. This button makes the popup sticky — just like a good waffle. This is quite helpful, since otherwise the popup will disappear the minute you try to inspect, debug, or modify it using the Browser Toolbox.

popup_sticky

Next to the waffle is a button with a downward arrow on it. This button lets you select which content to debug — so, for example, you could select the HTML of your popup. When you have a sticky popup selected, you can inspect and hack on its HTML and CSS just like you would any other web content.

content_selector

This information is now documented in great detail on MDN. Check it out!

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

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