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Benjamin Kerensa: North America Mozilla Reps Meetup

Mozilla planet - ti, 08/04/2014 - 03:14
DSC 0213 300x200 North America Mozilla Reps Meetup

Our group photo

This weekend, North America Mozilla Reps gathered in the not-so-sunny Portland, Oregon. We worked from the Portland Office during the weekend, where we collaborated on plans for North America for the next six month period. We also tackled a number of topics from websites and refined our priority cities which will help us be more successful in moving forward in our mission to grow contributors in North America.

We were very fortunate to have some new people participate this time round including Lukas Blakk, Janet Swisher, Larissa Shapiro, Joanna Mazgaj, Robby Sayles, Prashish Rajbhandari, Tanner Filip, Dan Gherman and Christie Koehler. It was excellent to have a larger group because this brought ideas from people who see things through different lenses.

14 1 300x221 North America Mozilla Reps Meetup

Voodoo Donuts delivered Firefox Donuts 2.0

All in all, I feel we tackled a lot more work this time than our previous meetup last year in San Francisco and we decided to have our next meetup in Portland again. One of my favorite activities during the meetup was a diversity activity that Lukas led us in that many of us hope to do with our own communities.

We closed off the meetup with a trip to the Ground Kontrol Arcade and Bar where there were many games of Pac Man and Dance Dance Revolution.

 North America Mozilla Reps Meetup
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla CEO resignation sets off debate: #tellusatoday - USA TODAY

Nieuws verzameld via Google - ti, 08/04/2014 - 01:27

Forbes

Mozilla CEO resignation sets off debate: #tellusatoday
USA TODAY
Last week, Brendan Eich resigned as CEO of Mozilla under pressure after his support of California's ban on gay marriage surfaced. In 2008, he made a $1,000 contribution supporting Proposition 8. Comments from Twitter and Facebook are edited for clarity ...
Mozilla's CEO Showed the Cost of Disclosure Laws by Crossing the Satan ...Forbes
Mozilla's Statement on the Brendan Eich Controversy, ExplainedNational Review Online (blog)
Brendan Eich has the right to fight gay rights, but not to be Mozilla's CEOThe Guardian
Fox News -Salt Lake Tribune -CBS News
alle 253 nieuwsartikelen »Google Nieuws
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla's CEO Showed the Cost of Disclosure Laws by Crossing the Satan ... - Forbes

Nieuws verzameld via Google - mo, 07/04/2014 - 23:57

Mozilla's CEO Showed the Cost of Disclosure Laws by Crossing the Satan ...
Forbes
The policy lesson from the case of Mozilla's Brendan Eich, who was forced out as CEO of the tech giant he co-founded as a result of his support for Proposition 8—California's ballot initiative that defined marriage as the union of a man and a woman ...

Google Nieuws
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

David Rajchenbach Teller: A curse and a blessing

Mozilla planet - mo, 07/04/2014 - 23:54
The curse

When Brendan Eich stepped in as a CEO, Mozilla and him were immediately faced a storm demanding his resignation because of his political opinions. To the best of my knowledge, none of those responsible for the storm were employees of the Mozilla Corporation and only 4 or 5 of them were members of the Mozilla Community (they were part of the Mozilla Foundation, which is a different organization).

When Brendan Eich resigned from his position as an employee of Mozilla, Mozilla was immediately faced by a storm assuming that Brendan Eich had been fired, either because of his opinions or as a surrender to the first storm.

Both storms are still raging, fueled by angry (and dismayed and saddened) crowds and incompetent news reporting.

We will miss Brendan. We have suffered and we will continue suffering from these storms. But we can also salvage from them.

The blessing

Think about it. We are being criticized by angry crowds. But the individuals who form these crowds are not our enemies. Many of them care deeply about Freedom of Speech and are shocked because they believe that we are extinguishing this freedom. Others care primarily about equality, an equality that can seldom be achieved wherever there is no Freedom of Speech.

Freedom of Speech. This is one of the core values of Mozilla, one of the values for which we have been fighting all these years.

We are being criticized by some of the people who need us most. They are our users, or our potential users, and they are getting in touch with us. Through Facebook, through Twitter, through the contribute form, through the governance mailing-list, through our blogs, or in real life discussions.

Some will say that we should ignore them. Some will be tempted to answer anger with anger and criticism with superiority.

Do neither. They are our users. They deserve to be heard.

We should listen to them. We should answer their concerns, not with FAQs or with press releases, but with individual answers, because these concerns are valid. We should explain what really happened. We should show them how Mozilla is largely about defending Freedom of Speech through the Open Web.

So please join the effort to answer the angry crowds. If you can, please reach out to media and the public and get the story out there. If only one person out of a hundred angry users receives the message and decides to join the community and the fight for the open web, we will have salvaged a victory out of the storm.


Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Benoit Girard: Graphics Meetup 2014Q01

Mozilla planet - mo, 07/04/2014 - 20:06

I just arrived from the Graphics Meetup in early 2014. Before the week we wrapped up the port of tiling from Fennec OpenGL specific code to the abstract Compositor API. Here a summary of the projects we discussed (from my point of view, I’m missing things that I couldn’t attend):

GFX Taipei

  • Off main thread compositing on desktop (OMTCompositing): We discussed our plan for shipping OMTCompositing to desktop and unify our compositing code. Moving compositing off the main thread is a prerequisite for the many projects that build on it such as OMTAnimation, OMTVideo, tiling and Async Pan Zoom. Matt Woodrow managed to make some sizable progress at the end of the week. Our plan is to double down on our resources to get this shipped on desktop.
  • Tiling: Bringing tiling to desktop will be important to better support 4k displays and to support Async Pan Zoom. We decided to focus on OMTCompositing before shipping tiling on desktop.
  • Async Pan Zoom: We discussed upcoming improvements to Async Pan Zoom like hit testing, scroll snap requirements. We discussed our plan to have Async Pan Zoom on the desktop. Mstange has a working prototype of APZ on mac. For now we will first focus on shipping OMTCompositing separately. Changes to the input event queue and dealing with the plugins window on Windows will be a significant problem.
  • Graphics regression test on b2g: We discussed with mchang from the b2g performance team the best way to get b2g performance regressions tests. We decided to focus on some micro benchmarks to isolate platform regressions from gaia regressions by using the Gfx Test App. Kats convinced me that FrameMetrics could be use to accurately measure ‘checkerboarding’ so we will be rolling out some tests based on that as well.
  • VSync: Vincent has been leading the effort of getting Gecko to correctly VSync. This project is very important because no matter how fast we render our animations will never be fluid if we don’t follow vsync carefully. We had a long design review and I’m fairly happy with the result. TL;DR: We will be interpolating input events and driving the refresh driver off the vsync signal.
  • Eideticker: We discussed the challenges of supporting Eideticker using an external camera instead of MHL.
  • WebGL: We reaffirmed our plans to continue to support new WebGL extensions, focus on conformance issues, update the conformance testsuite and continue to work on WebGL 2.
  • Skia: We decided to try to rebase once every 6 weeks. We will be focusing on Skia content on android and SkiaGL canvas on mac.
  • RR with graphics: Roc presented RR (blog). It really blew me away that RR already supported Firefox on Linux. We had a discussion on some of the challenges with using RR with graphics (OpenGL, X) and how it could benefit us.
  • LayerScope: LayerScope will be extended to show frame tree dumps and which display items are associated with which layer.
  • Task Tracer: Shelly presented Task Tracer. We discussed how to integrate it with the profiler and Cleopatra.
  • Ownerships: We’re looking into different approaches to add ownership of sub-modules within graphics and how it can help with improving design and reviews.
  • Designs: We discussed on how to bring better design to the graphics module. We’re going to perform design reviews in bugzilla and keep the final design in a docs folder in the graphics components. This means that design changes will be peer reviewed and versioned.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Gervase Markham: Mozilla Voices

Mozilla planet - mo, 07/04/2014 - 18:00

I invited people to email me; here’s what they have been saying.

I fear that Mozilla showed a weakness, when we replied to that initial complaint. We showed people we care about what they had to say about Brendan, and about politics. I think we shouldn’t. …

Although technically we are still good, I fear that our community is strained right now. We need to forget all politics, and focus on the mission. Only the mission. We shouldn’t care about other things. Hopefully we will pull through…

Recent events have made me very angry, and the more I think about it, the angrier I get. …

Brendan understood that for Mozilla to be successful in its mission, participants needed to check their prejudices at the door and work together to build this great thing. And he himself compartmentalized his prejudices away from his work life.

He awarded others this tolerance, but in the end was not awarded it himself by others.

While I am myself a strong supporter of equal marriage rights, I am shocked by what was done to Brendan. It was truly vindictive and intolerant, completely unbecoming of a movement that claims to fight for tolerance.

I am not sure what you will do with the feedback you get, but if you can, in the middle of the rest, express that there exists a point of view that the leadership does not listen well enough and needs to open up lines of communication to the leadership from employees, the community and even non-community users, that idea would be worth communicating.

I feel that Brendan was unfairly persecuted for expressing his views even though it seems evident he never allowed any personal views to affect his ability to function.

People have been justifying bashing his position on the basis that equality is normally and editorially required for any position of power. Unfortunately these people are either bordering on misinformed or purely idiotic.

I am surprised at how mean people can be toward Brendan. It is a big loss for Mozilla.

I have been using Firefox since it was called Phoenix. I have installed it on many PCs. I learned Javascript on Firefox. I was loyal to Firefox during the difficult years when it had memory and speed issues. I was generally impressed with Mozilla’s stance on the Open Web. Now, I am not so impressed with Mozilla.

Somebody has been forced to resign from Mozilla because of his beliefs/ideas/opinions. That is exactly the opposite of what Mozilla states to be its “mission” …

I find it horrific that this backlash is a repeat of what you experienced two years ago. And it’s deeply affected me in my impression of how welcomed Christians are at Mozilla.

If you want your voice heard, or just want to talk in confidence (say if so), please email me.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Tim Taubert: A ready-to-use virtual build environment for Firefox

Mozilla planet - mo, 07/04/2014 - 18:00

If you ever wondered what contributing to Firefox feels like but you never had the time to read and follow through our instructions to setup a build environment or wanted to avoid screwing around with your precious system then this might be for you.

This article will guide you through a small list of steps that in the end will leave you with a virtual machine ready to modify and build your own development version of Firefox.

I hope this will be valuable to novice programmers that do not have a full C++ development environment at hand as well as to the more experienced folks with little time and lots of curiosity.

1) Install VirtualBox

Note: The Open Virtualization Format (OVF) is supported by other Virtualization Environments such as VMWare, etc. You can use those if already installed instead of VirtualBox.

Go to the VirtualBox Downloads page and download the latest version available for your operating system. Should you already have VirtualBox installed then please ensure you are running the latest version by checking for updates before continuing.

2) Download the Firefox Build Environment

Now is the time to download the virtual machine containing our development environment ready to modify and build Firefox. You can get it here:

http://vmimages.mozilla.net/ovf/FirefoxBuildEnv.ova
(sha1 = c5717af5cccdc2c42e0a236a9859abffd940df9a)

Downloading ~2.6 GB might take a while if you are on a slow connection, sorry.

3) Set up the virtual machine

Once the image has been downloaded you can double-click the .ova file and import the new virtual machine into VirtualBox. Please give it at least 2048MB of RAM (4096MB if you can) and the same number of processors that your host machine has available. Building Firefox takes up a lot of resources and you want it to build as fast as possible.

Now that your virtual machine is ready, boot it and wait for the Ubuntu desktop to be shown. A terminal will pop up automatically and do some last steps before we can get started. After a successful installation Sublime 2 should start automatically.

Note: Should you ever need root credentials, use “firefox-dev” as the password. If you want to change your Language and Keyboard settings then follow the instructions on How to change the UI Language in Ubuntu.

4) Build Firefox

Click Tools > Build to start the process. This might take a long time depending on the features of your host machine, please be patient. You can watch the build progress in the text editor’s console at the bottom. Once the build has finished you can use Tools > Run to start your custom Firefox build and check that everything works as expected.

Note: if you want to switch from an optimized to a debug build then choose Tools > Build System > Firefox (Debug) and hit Tools > Build again to start a debug build.

5) Now what?

You successfully built Firefox for the first time and wonder what’s next? How about picking a small bug for a start, contribute code and get your changes shipped to half a billion people? If that sounds compelling then take a look at Bugs Ahoy! and find something to work on that sounds interesting to you.

If you are interested in digging deeper into the build system or the version control system, or want to know more about how to create your first patch and post it to our bug tracker then take a look at our Code Firefox Lessons.

I would love to hear your feedback about the Firefox Build Environment! Please tell me what can be improved and what you would like to see in the next version. Do not hesitate to drop me a mail should you have a more detailed opinion.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Christian Heilmann: Fear, Anger and Gloat – or how to deal with a communication nightmare

Mozilla planet - mo, 07/04/2014 - 14:52

Being in the middle a communication nightmare is never fun, but it is an important learning experience. I am sure that most problems start with miscommunication and escalate from there.

Say something happens, that you very much disagree with. Someone says something that attacks you personally, your beliefs or a group that you very much identify you with.

This doesn’t feel good, and it starts a few other feelings. It could be anger, disgust, annoyance, helplessness, fear, embarrassment, insecurity, just to name a few. None of those are good feelings. Some can be turned to good results but most make you feel at the lowest level unproductive and at the other end utterly shattered.

Let’s take a look at the most common ones:

Fear

fear makes people to horrible things

“Fear is the mind killer” is absolute truth. People who are afraid stop contributing and are silenced. This is how totalitarian regimes work: you show yourself as all-powerful and the one to make decisions and you silence all of those who speak against you in a very public and brutal fashion. This makes everyone live in fear – citizens and enemies alike. Fear makes you feel helpless, you don’t want to speak up as you don’t want to stand out. In the worst cases you don’t want to speak out as it would punish all the ones you love. You don’t want to speak as you will feel the brunt of the loud and aggressive masses. You have input to give but you feel that it isn’t fair that because of what you stand for you get pushed into a certain group in a loggerheads scenario of black and white.

Anger

Anger can be productive. I am angry at myself to let my flat get to the state it is in now, so I am cleaning up. Anger can also be the end of any sensible discussion or dangerous. I cycle a lot in London. People cut into my lane, people push closer to me than they should. I could knock on their cars or shout at them. That would most likely get me killed as it would distract them and startle them into violent movements. Sometimes the best is to count to 10 and let it pass. Anger has an unfortunate tendency to pile up.

Holding on to anger is like drinking poison and expecting the other person to die - Buddha

Gloat

In most long communication problems sooner or later it turns out that one of the attackers isn’t without flaws and innocent either. This shouldn’t be a surprise – we’re all human. In many cases the most avid attackers of a cause are people who are just afraid of being the thing they attack. Fear again. Gloating about this is toxic. It is a game of throwing the blame back and forth that nobody can win.

What to do, what to be aware of?

Over the last few days I got many reassuring emails and messages from all sides of the debate thanking me for a less-heated stance and analysis. I am not a super-human with the patience of a saint. Instead I learned to analyse my own actions and think and reflect before throwing things out. I fail at times at this, too, but I get better and I am happy about this. The most important thing is to be aware of your effects, instead of your message.

Mistake to avoid #1: Twitter is terrible for emotionally loaded topics

loose tweets sink fleets

Twitter is awesome. I like the 140 character limit, as it makes me think before sending something away. Sadly it also allows for very short and strong messages that can turn into a ping-pong game of snark and ultimately, hatred or a grumpy “agree to disagree”.

Before you send a tweet about a sensitive subject, think about the following:

  • Tweets make great comments that can be taken out of topic by media and other people. Nobody cares about the whole thread. The juicy bit is what gets quoted. Then it is up to you to defend yourself and bring context, that only 10% (if you are lucky) of the readers will ever hear about. Instead they themselves start shouting the wrong quote.
  • Tweets are archived – of sorts and can be used against you months later. Doesn’t matter if your views changed, as you can not change the tweet it can be attributed to you. Oh yes, you can delete a tweet, but for the press this is an even better message. “$company employee showed his criticism on twitter but subsequently deleted the tweet.” is a good hint to claim your company or peer group censors you.

Mistake to avoid #2: Get bullied into giving information you don’t have

Don’t assume things. You have a brain; question them instead. One thing is simple to follow and important to understand: if you do not know something, don’t assume. It is as simple as that. You don’t know, so don’t say yes or no as you can be quoted and then it is up to you to explain yourself again. This is especially bad when your choice of guess was very wrong and you end up being put in a group you don’t want to be in. There is nothing more annoying than to be applauded by people you don’t like as you helped their cause.

People will try to bully you into taking a side, especially on Twitter. These people don’t care about insight (although that is a common trick: “hey, you are on the inside, this is amazing, I’d love to hear your ideas about this”); they want to have ammunition for attacks. “how can you say that didn’t happen or isn’t true? $x of your company said so, I can prove it here”. Don’t fall for this. Instead, turn the tables and ask questions. Repeat your questions if needed. Here are some I used:

  • Where did you get this information from? I don’t know about that and wasn’t part of this decision. Can you show me?
  • That’s an interesting topic and question, but I don’t think it can be answered here and in this format.
  • Would you like people to talk about this topic if it revolved around you without having full insight? I would feel bad about this.

Do not say “No comment”. This means you know, but you choose to or aren’t allowed to say. It is an invitation to pester you until you give out the information you’re hiding.

Mistake to avoid #3: Get scared and withhold information that is important

Be afraid of those who are out to get bad quotes, don’t be afraid of your colleagues. Unhappy silence doesn’t help – showing unity does. Talk to colleagues, talk to people who are near you and tell them about your feelings. Point out to people who you think are out of line directly and personally that they are. It is up to them to realise their mistakes and make amends, not for you to jump into the ring with them. The silent majority has important points to make, and you have the right to tell them to the loud ones.
If you are afraid of speaking out, tell people who do and ask them to bring your point of view into the mix. You don’t have to become the target, but you can be a helper to bring out the truth. Not the loudest should win.

Mozillians: This is an offer – if you have points that worry you and feel too intimidated to speak, tell me. I will keep you anonymous but do my best to tell people about your POV.

Mistake to avoid #4: Get consumed by anger

The less you respond to negative people, the more peaceful your life will become

Very angry people don’t want to find resolutions. They want to vent, they want others to feel bad so they can feel better. They want to win and silencing someone by beating them verbally into submission is a big kick for them. Avoid becoming that person. It can happen. Do not feed the trolls. My mother always said “the one who screams, is wrong”. I do know punk bands with great lyrics and messages, but on the whole, I think she is right.

What can you do?

Don’t be silent too long. Don’t wait until things blow over and then give your opinion publicly. This just drags the issues out further. Instead, help finding solutions. Be part of the healing and learning process. Simple things work:

  • Research and uncover obvious wrong messages – tell them to those who are paid to communicate for you. It is an arrow in their quiver
  • Listen to people and offer help – if someone is obviously shaken, angry or feels helpless, contact them directly and offer a sympathetic ear. You might just help someone avoiding to become a target
  • Tell people when they are destructive – personally and not in public. Don’t shout, just point out how what they said could be seen out of context and how it made you feel
  • Take breaks – it is very easy to get into a frenzy by following everything that happens and our new happy social media world is made up of this. Information is an addiction and you want more and more and more and faster and faster. The fastest moving news is bad news and the most re-iterated information is most likely wrong but sounds important. (There was a lovely part in Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy where one race built a spacecraft powered by bad news. It was the fastest ever, but nobody was happy when it arrived on their planet)

Be nice to each other out there, protect yourself from being misquoted and ask lots and lots of questions. If you feel attacked by someone you didn’t expect to be attacked by, tell them directly and immediately and say how it made you feel.

Human communication is 20% what we say and 80% how we say it – voice, body language, facial expression. All of this is missing online, so let’s bring it back by talking to each other rather than shouting publicly trying to get heard.

baby bat

We have two ears and one mouth, we should listen more than speak and more importantly listen all around before we do so.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Matěj Cepl: Out of the Frying Pan into the Fire

Mozilla planet - mo, 07/04/2014 - 11:28

 I’ve decided I will let my web browser provider think whatever they want, so long as they don’t support fascist segregation of ideas

— ertdfg in a discussion on other blog post

I have struggled since the start of this one particular battle of the Kulturkampf with a question how should I react. I certainly value honoring your opponents in the discussion (which is IMHO much better concept than mere freedom of expression, which is rather limited and legalistic) very highly, and if that was in stake, I wouldn’t mind to loose my browser for it (or job, or many other things; I grew up in the Communist Czechoslovakia, so I know a little bit what I am talking about). However, is this the case? And is loosing Firefox which otherwise IS the most freedom-loving browser around (switching to Chrome feels to me truly like jumping straight out of the frying pan into the center of the fire).

Thinking about some other hot topic issues (actually participation of a Protestant in Eucharist; tell me about controversial issue, this was the one actual battles with dead people lying on the battlefield were fought for!) I came to the preliminary conclusion that the worst thing is when your opponents drive your decision by negation. Back to the issue of Firefox, Brendan, and tolerance. The worst thing we can do is to switch from Firefox, and let ourselves drawn on the shitty (literally, that's the stuff fought with over there) battlefield of these cultural wars. If we want to keep our discussion on more civilized level, we shouldn’t let be drawn to the level of bigots. “Answer not a fool according to his folly, lest thou also be like unto him.” (Proverbs 6:24 KJV; or in the modern paraphrase “Don’t argue with idiots because they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience.”)

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Pascal Chevrel: My Q1-2014 report

Mozilla planet - mo, 07/04/2014 - 10:48

Here is what I did in Q1

Tools and code

This quarter we have made 2 releases of Transvision (3.1 and 3.2). For 3.1, most of the credit goes to my colleague (and Italian localizer) Francesco Lodolo who integrated his productization scripts into the app and worked on redesigning the menus and making the app better in responsive mode, my work on 3.1 was limited on performance patches and release management. Transvision 3.2 received a lot more of my code as it integrated one major new feature (planned since I took the project under my umbrella two years ago), which is indexing all translations of our flagship website www.mozilla.org. So now Transvision is no longer a search engine and QA tool for all of our products translations, it also supports websites using the .lang format (next up is indexing websites using gettext). From a developper perspective, this is also the release in which we automate the generation of the documentation of our classes thanks to phpDocumentor. Currently I am working on a better MVC approach and organization of code so as to work on features such as atom feeds, on the fly generation of TMX files and other more flexible export features, it may be in addition or in replacement of the TMX files we generate at extraction time. Caching is also in the pipe, the app is currently very fast and responsive but caching could help us extend more our external API to more time consuming data generation.

A personal achievement is that I finally rewrote my old Web Dashboard (whose code dated back to 2007) and moved that to github. Two new features, direct query of web localization bugs per locale on Bugzilla and display of the translation status for most of the projects hosted on Verbatim, our web localization platform, the latter was a patch by Francesco. The big feature is that the code went from 6000 lines of spaghetti code to 400 clean code, old features that made sense 7 years ago and now useless were removed and the fact that we can now track www.mozilla.org work in Bugzilla per locale allowed cutting a lot of code. Pretty happy that this was totally transparent to the user and that we are already starting to add new features to help us ship software!

On the Langchecker side, the tool we use to track .lang based projects and deploy lang files on repositories, I added per locale json feeds for the status of the locale and it now warns about invalid metadata and can now removes obsolete or invalid tags that we use on mozilla.org to activate a feature for a locale on a page. We also used it to expose strings from our first project based on Pontoon.

Other small tools of mine got updated, my mass bug filing script can now file bugs marked as mozilla confidential, something we needed for Mobile World Congress pages, I whipped up a script using Transvision data to know the distribution of strings across components in Firefox/FirefoxOS which allows specifically to know how many strings we have for devtools (potentially a future Transvision feature) etc.

All in all, I'd say I spent about 30% of my time this quarter hacking on code, which is cool.

Events and community

This quarter I attended one event outside of Paris, Fosdem. As usual it was interesting in terms of networking with European open source hacktivists. I also organized a one day event in the Paris office with April which mostly consisted of workshops on how to contribute to an open source project (I led two workshops on participating to Mozilla localization). I also attended 3 events in the Paris office, one with the French community to welcome half a dozen new volunteers, one with Rosana and Goofy dedicated  to SUMO localization and a last one which was an impromptu meeting between the French community and Brian King from Reps. With a Paris office tailored for meetings, I expect that I will continue to organize / attend to community meetings locally instead of travelling a lot like in the past, that's more compatible with my recent fatherhood :)

This wasn't a big quarter in terms of finding contributors, I can identify only 2 new people that became active and productive in the Mozilla l10n project directly because of me, that was mostly due to the fact that I spent more time on shipping projects and building tools this quarter. I also had some more paperwork than usual to deal with as I have an intern starting in April and I also worked with my colleagues on a tax refund paper for Research and Development in the Paris office.

I spent some specific time helping the Lithuanian community trying to grow in general, we created an IRC channel, opened a mailing list for Lithuania, did some work on etherpads  and contacted other open source projects in Lithuanians, past contributors, would be contributors through the Contribute page... We found some people interested in helping with l10n but more work will be needed to reboot the Lithuanian community (not just in l10n).

I also closed the mozilla.community.europe which had been created after we closed Mozilla Europe and merged its activities with Mozilla, it unfortunately never attracted any activity and was just collecting spam (which I had to delete on a daily basis).

About the Transvision community, the project reached 9 committers in March, is now listed on What Can I Do for Mozilla (which makes it the only active PHP project listed on the site ;)). It is growing slowly but steadily on all fronts (uses, codebase, contributors, features...). We are also working on making it easier to hack (static and automatic documentation, better installation scripts...) but one of the roadblock is the amount of data that needs to be downloaded first to make it useful locally, the sum of our hg/git/svn repos are about 17GB big. Even after extraction of strings from all of our repos, it is probably like 200MB of text, we may evaluate a downloadable snapshot of that in the install process to make it easier for contributors that want to hack on it.

From a tooling community perspective, big thanks to Enrique Estevez, our galician localizer, who is working on upstreaming patches to OmegaT to make it work better with Mozilla formats (.properties and .lang) and who is also writing an Omega T plugin to get translation suggestions from Transvision. Babelzilla also contacted me for similar purposes, that means that at least four Mozilla tools use it or plan to use it directly (Mozilla Translator, OmegaT, Pontoon, Babelzilla). We will put a focus on improving, documenting and versionning our external API this year to make it easier to the tools community to integrate it.

Mozilla.org localization

On Mozilla.org, the big deal this year was like last year the Mobile World Congress event, we updated all of our Firefox OS pages and home page + tabzilla in 17 languages in time before the event and also added some extra content for a dozen of these locales. As usual with big projects, we exposed feature needs and we now can publish promotions in tabzilla per locale, using the same mecanism as for the home page, so as to target only the languages that we were working on for MWC.

MWC was not all though, we also worked on a new Pricacy page for a few locales, we worked on a landing page for Firefox Metro, but unfortunately the product got cancelled, we updated a lot of older content, made patches in our templates to avoid duplicated strings, shipped new locales on the release channel with all o their web content done (Xhosa and Aragonese) and shipped Malay on the Beta and Aurora channels too.

The amount of strings is now around 1500 for a big locale on mozilla.org and about 600 for a small locale. Of course, since we have frequent content changes (promos, minor string updates on tabzilla, download pages, in-product pages...), this is actually more, especially for the bigger locales and Firefox OS locales, but I am happy that we succeed in keeping all of the locales in good shape, especially the small ones, while not slowing down the creation of English content. The site is definitely getting better and more localized month after month, two years after the switch to Django and the total rewrite, this is starting to look really good again.

And now Q2!

Expect Q2 to be more of the same :) One interesting point is that I am taking Theo Chevalier, our main French localizer, for an internship at Mozilla, which means that he will work on all of the cool stuff I have in mind but never get the time to do (like working on growing our l10n Firefox Nightly userbase which is ridiculously low compared to en-US), he will also of course work on the big Q2 project that is the launch of Firefox Australis!

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mike Conley: Much Ado About Brendan (or As I’ve Seen It)

Mozilla planet - mo, 07/04/2014 - 10:30

Since Brendan Eich’s resignation, I’ve been struggling to articulate what I think and feel about the matter. It’s been difficult. I haven’t been able to find what I wanted to say. Many other better, smarter, and more qualified Mozillians have written things about this, and I was about to let it go. I didn’t just want to say “me too”.

I felt I had nothing of substance to contribute. I feebly wrote something about Brendan Eich and the Kobayashi Maru, but it became a rambling mess, and the analogy fell apart quite quickly. I was about to call it quits on contributing my thoughts.

And then this post happened.

Don’t ask me where this came from. A muse woke me up in the night to write it (it’s just past 4AM for crying out loud – muse, let me sleep). Maybe through the lens of this nonsense, some real sense will prevail. I’m not hopeful, but this muse is nodding emphatically (and grinning like a lunatic).

Please believe that I’m not at all trying to trivialize, oversimplify, or make light of the events of the past few weeks by writing this. I’m just trying to understand it, and view it with a looking glass I have at least a little familiarity with.

And maybe it’s mostly catharsis.

I also apologize that it’s not really told like a story from the Bard. I think that’d be too long winded (no offense, Shakey). I’m pretty sure the narrator / stage directions have the most lines. It’s actually quite criminal.

I also want to point out that the only “real world names” in this little travesty is Brendan Eich’s and Mitchell Baker’s. The rest are from the world of Shakespeare.

And I also apologize that it’s not in iambic pentameter – that’d probably be more appropriate, but I have neither the wit nor the patience to pull this off with that much verisimilitude.

Oooh! Verisimilitude! Fancy words! Enough apologies, let’s get started.

Much Ado About Brendan (or As I’ve Seen It) Prologue

Venice, Italy. Sometime during the Renaissance. This glorious city is composed of many families – the Montague’s, the Capulet’s, the Macbeth’s, the MacDuff’s, the Aguecheeks, the Fortanbras, the Whitmore’s, and many many more. Too many to name or count.

Many of these families argue and disagree about things. There’s almost always one thing that one family does or thinks that another family just cannot abide by.

It is in this turbulent city of families that we find The Merchant’s Building. The Merchant’s of Venice are selling their wares, lending or selling books, playing music, and much more – and people are constantly streaming in and out. It’s a marketplace of endless possibility.

In one section of The Merchant’s Building, is the Mozilla booth. Mozilla does and makes many things – but it’s probably best known for its Firefox jewelry. Mozilla is one of a small number of merchants giving away jewelry – and jewelry, in this building, is special: the more people wear your jewelry, the more of a voice you have at the Merchant’s Weekly Meeting, where the rules of the building are written and refined.

So what is special about this Mozilla merchant? Why should we wear their jewelry? There are certainly other merchants giving away jewelry a few booths down. What does Mozilla bring to the table?

For one thing, the jewelry is beautiful. And it makes you walk faster. And it’s got the latest features. And it makes it harder for sketchy people to follow you. And it doesn’t have a built-in tracking device recording which merchants you’re visiting. And you can add cool charms to it, and make it look exactly how you want it.

And another thing that’s unique to the Mozilla booth is that they’re composed of members of every single family in Venice. Every single family has at least one member working in the Mozilla booth. And what’s more – a bunch of these workers are volunteering their time and efforts to make this stuff!

Why? Why do they volunteer? And why do these family members work side by side with people their families might balk at, or sneer at?

Well, In the very center of the Mozilla booth, overhanging the whole thing, is… The Mission. The Mission is the guiding principals upon which the Mozilla booth operates. This is what these family members bury their gauntlets for. They work, sweat and bleed side by side for this mission. This is their connective tissue. This is what guides them when they vote and argue for things at the Merchant’s Weekly Meeting.

The other truly unique thing about the Mozilla booth is that there are no walls to it! You can walk right in, and watch the craftspeople make jewelry! Heck, you can sit right down at a bench and somebody will show you how to make some yourself. They’ll guide you, and they’ll critique you, and soon, somebody will be wearing a piece of jewelry that you made.

The greatest debates also occur within the Mozilla booth. People stand on soap boxes and give their opinions about jewelry, or other merchandise – or merchandise practices. People say what they think out loud, and perhaps print it on a t-shirt and wear it. Sometimes, discussions get heated, but level thinking usually prevails because these Mozillians are an unusually bright bunch.

ACT I

There is a leadership selection underway. Someone needs to be the Chief of Business Affairs (or CBA) in the Mozilla booth. The current chief, Jay, has been holding the position as an interim chief, and the Board of Business Affairs is trying to select someone to take the position permanently.

Two members of this board already have their bags packed – for a while now, they’ve been neglecting other interests of theirs, and after this chief is selected, they feel they need to do other things.

Enter Brendan Eich. Brendan Eich is chief craftsperson of the makers of jewelry in the Mozilla booth. He’s a brilliant and widely respected craftsperson himself, having invented some of the amazing techniques that are used by all serious jewelry makers. He is also one of the founders of the Mozilla booth, having set it up with Mitchell Baker.

The Board of Business Affairs selects Brendan to be the next Chief of Business Affairs.

They announce this, and there is much applause! People clap Brendan on the back. Many craftspeople are pleased that one of their own will be in charge.

The two board members, as they’ve agreed to, take their bags, salute, and walk off out of the booth and on to other things.

A third board member leaves as well, but for reasons not related to what I describe below.

Suddenly, several Montague’s and Montague supporters in the Mozillian booth grow concerned. They recall that several years ago, Brendan had donated $1000 dollars to a law that supported Capulet values – a law which impacted their rights. The Montague’s and Montague supporters grow concerned that someone who supports this Capulet law is not fit to be Chief of a booth that houses all of the families, Montague’s included.

Several of these Montague’s raise these concerns out loud. This is not unusual in the Mozilla booth, as most concerns are raised out loud – and, as usual, debate begins. Brendan states that he will 100% abide by the Mozilla participation guidelines, and what’s more, began supporting a project that a Montague in the Mozilla booth has been working on – to bring more Montague’s into the booth.

Vigorous debate continues, as is the Mozilla booth custom.

However, as the booth lets anybody in, and the debate can be heard outside of the booth, several Montague’s and Montague supporters hear these concerns and start passing the message along to one another – a Capulet has been selected to be the CBA!

Many of these Montague’s are reasonable, and say and write reasonable arguments about why they are concerned, and why Brendan may not be the right choice as CBA.

ACT II

A few meters away, the Cupid booth overhears all of this concern from the Montague’s. Perhaps they really are Montague supportors (or, more likely, they just wanted to perk up business), but they suddenly decide to take a stand. For people who try to come into their booth wearing Firefox jewelry, they have to read a big sign that tells them about why the Cupid booth believes that restricting the rights of Montague’s is terrible, and that the Mozilla booth is terrible for making a Capulet the CBA. They tell the people wearing Firefox jewelry that they should probably wear other things.

And so some people start to take off their Firefox jewelry. Some Montague’s take it off angrily, and smash it into the ground – stomping it with their feet, creating a big dust cloud.

Enter Iago, and his team of writers. There are many writers and story-sellers in the Merchant’s Building, but Iago is one of those writers that just wants people to listen to him. He likes to twist words and make things up, or to insinuate things that are not true. He saw the board members leaving the Mozilla booth and concocts some headlines, insinuating that they left in protest of Brendan’s support of the Capulet laws. He also writes about how all of the Mozillians in the booth were not supporting Brendan’s appointment as CBA (which is not true – it’s true that some were concerned and questioned the wisdom of his appointment, but certainly not all). He writes and he writes, and his messengers pass copies and leaflets around. Montague’s and Montague supporters read these leaflets, or hear people talking about them, and they grow very concerned. More Montague’s start to take off their Firefox jewelry.

Some Montague’s start to engage with Mozillians and try to figure out what is happening. As always, each family has calm and reasonable people to converse with – and that’s always welcome in the Mozilla booth.

However, every family also has their groundlings. The groundlings are the members of a family who are always looking for a fight. Always looking for blood. Always hoping an actor will forget their lines, and will shout distracting things at them to make it happen. They always have a bag of rotten fruit and vegetables with them to throw. Some of them just like to make trouble.

Every family has their groundlings. You’ve probably met some yourself.

The groundlings start to hear these rumors that Iago has been spreading around, copied and recopied, distorted and mutilated – and they see the signs at the Cupid booth.

And they rush the Mozilla booth! They start throwing rotten fruit and vegetables, and they tear off their Firefox jewelry, and swear to never wear it again! They gnash their teeth, and they rip out their own hair in a rage, and they scream and yell and make so much noise – it’s almost impossible for the craftspeople in the Mozilla booth to work!

A tempest of Montague rage was upon the Mozilla booth.

ACT III

After several hours of this, Brendan addresses the crowd outside, and speaks to some storytellers (Iago and his team are among them – he always is).

They ask him if he renounces Capulet ways, or if he will apologize for the Montague rights that were impacted by the Capulet law that he helped fund.

And Brendan says something along the lines of “I don’t think that’s helpful to discuss. I don’t think that’s relevant here. I’m not going to run this booth as if everybody in here were Capulets – I helped make this booth, I know that it’s composed of many families, and I know how it operates.”

But Iago and the groundlings were not satisfied. They put up signs and placards claiming that anybody wearing Firefox jewelry is supporting the Capulets!

The Mozillians look at all of the broken and stomped-on jewelry on the market ground. All their work, being trampled. If this continues, their ability to improve things for all families at the Merchant’s Weekly Meeting will fade. Their ability to enact their Mission will fade. They are agitated, discouraged, upset, angry, sad, anxious, confused – a cocktail of emotion playing pretty much the entire spectrum.

Brendan’s speech had not done anything to quell the groundlings. And Iago could smell blood, and was not going to stop writing about Brendan or Mozilla.

The other leaders look to Brendan. What will we do?

And Brendan said, “This noise is getting absurdly loud. How are we supposed to work under these conditions? There’s no way we can enact the mission like this.”

And Brendan steps onto the proscenium, and says:

To leave, or not to leave, that is the question—
Whether ’tis Nobler in the mind to suffer
The Slings and Arrows of outrageous Fortune,
Or to take Arms against a Sea of troubles,
And by opposing end them?

And so, after much thought, he takes arms. He sacrifices, and he chooses to leave the booth – the booth he helped plant into the ground over 15 years ago. The booth he helped build, the jewelry and techniques he helped craft.

“I think if I leave, you folks might have a chance to keep the mission going.”

And so he leaves, to the heartbreak of many Mozillians, and to the cheering of the Montague groundlings outside.

ACT IV

Several of the more sensible Montague’s watch Brendan leave and wonder if perhaps the groundlings in their family have made them look petty and vindictive. Some of them are also sad that Brendan left the Mozilla booth – all they wanted from him was an apology, they say. That would have sufficed, they say. They didn’t expect or want him to leave the whole booth.

But the damage is done, and Brendan has left. There is no chief craftsperson, and there is no CBA. Holy shit.

The Mozillians in the booth start to get back to work, since the cheers of the Montague’s outside are much easier to work against as a backdrop than the booing, hissing and food-throwing. A bunch of Montague’s dust off their stomped Firefox jewelry (or grab new copies!) and put them back on proudly. Others are happy with the new jewelry they got, and don’t care about the Mission. Still others never took off the Firefox jewelry, but said they did. And now they wear it publicly again, proudly.

But suddenly, the Capulets and Capulet supporters in and around the Mozilla booth look at this gaping void where Brendan was and sense injustice. This was wrong, they cry! This man should not have been chased out of here!

Vigorous debate begins, as is the Mozilla booth custom.

And reasonable Capulets say and write reasonable things about why they think it was wrong for Brendan to have left.

And Iago, who never really left the area, hears all of this, and smells more blood in the air. He takes his poison pen, and writes stories about how Brendan was forcibly removed from the Mozilla booth by an angry mob of Montague’s. He writes that, like Julius Cesar, Brendan was heard gasping “Et tu, Brute?” as he was stabbed by his fellow senators – or, like King Hamlet, poisoned and betrayed by the people closest to him.

But as usual, Iago gets this completely wrong. Not that he cares or bothers to check. What a douche. And LOUD too, holy smokes. And people listen to Iago, and read what he writes, and hear what he says, and the rumours abound!

And a second tempest starts to brew.

ACT V

Many reasonable Capulets, both inside and outside of the Mozilla booth are concerned about what this means for them. Does this mean that Capulets aren’t allowed to become CBA’s? That’s certainly against the inclusiveness guidelines, is it not? And much debate resonated, as is the Mozilla way.

But, as you recall, every family has their groundlings, and the Capulets are no exception. The Capulet groundlings heard the rumours that Iago and his ilk were slinging, and they gnashed their teeth, and they pulled out their hair.

“YOU KILLED BRENDAN”, the groundings howled at the Mozilla booth.

“No, he left on his own accord to save us and the mission,” some Mozillians said with sadness.

“NO HE DIDN’T, HE WAS BETRAYED AND MURDERED BY HIS CLOSEST ALLIES!” the groundlings yelled back.

“No, that’s simply not true. He left on his own accord in an attempt to save the booth and the mission.”

And the reasonable Capulets understood this, and they understood the mindblowing complexities of this whole clusterfuck. And they spoke with reason and passion.

The Mozillian craftspeople got up from their work making jewelry to talk to these Capulets, and the supporters of the Capulets. And many were very reasonable and calm – but the groundlings among them were vicious and yelled and made so much noise. In some ways, their rage was indistinguishable from the Montegue groundling rage, which I believe is some kind of irony.

And, as you’d expect, the Capulet groundlings, like all groundlings, love blood. They love a fight. And they tore off their Firefox jewelry, and they stamped it into the ground. Vegetables and rotten fruit started to be thrown at the Mozilla booth. Again.

And the Mozillians in the booth looked at each other. They looked at the gaping void where Brendan used to stand. They all hugged one another, and comforted one another, as the jeers and boos of the groundlings got louder and louder, and as rotten fruit and vegetables slammed into them and their works.

And this is where we currently are, I believe.

Epilogue

If these ramblings have offended,
Think but this, and all is mended,
That you have but slumber’d here
While these visions did appear.
And this weak and idle theme,
No more yielding but a dream,
Gentles, do not reprehend:
if you pardon, we will mend:
And, as I am an honest Mike,
I do yet miss this Brendan Eich.
Now to ‘scape the serpent’s tongue,
We will make amends ere long;
Else the Mike a liar call;
So, good night unto you all.
Give me your hands, if we be friends,
And Robin shall restore amends.

For a less silly and more sober analysis of what happened, I suggest reading this next.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mike Conley: Much Ado About Brendan (or As I’ve Seen It)

Thunderbird - mo, 07/04/2014 - 10:30

Since Brendan Eich’s resignation, I’ve been struggling to articulate what I think and feel about the matter. It’s been difficult. I haven’t been able to find what I wanted to say. Many other better, smarter, and more qualified Mozillians have written things about this, and I was about to let it go. I didn’t just want to say “me too”.

I felt I had nothing of substance to contribute. I feebly wrote something about Brendan Eich and the Kobayashi Maru, but it became a rambling mess, and the analogy fell apart quite quickly. I was about to call it quits on contributing my thoughts.

And then this post happened.

Don’t ask me where this came from. A muse woke me up in the night to write it (it’s just past 4AM for crying out loud – muse, let me sleep). Maybe through the lens of this nonsense, some real sense will prevail. I’m not hopeful, but this muse is nodding emphatically (and grinning like a lunatic).

Please believe that I’m not at all trying to trivialize, oversimplify, or make light of the events of the past few weeks by writing this. I’m just trying to understand it, and view it with a looking glass I have at least a little familiarity with.

And maybe it’s mostly catharsis.

I also apologize that it’s not really told like a story from the Bard. I think that’d be too long winded (no offense, Shakey). I’m pretty sure the narrator / stage directions have the most lines. It’s actually quite criminal.

And I also apologize that it’s not in iambic pentameter – that’d probably be more appropriate, but I have neither the wit nor the patience to pull this off with that much verisimilitude.

Oooh! Verisimilitude! Fancy words! Enough apologies, let’s get started.

Much Ado About Brendan (or As I’ve Seen It) Prologue

Venice, Italy. Sometime during the Renaissance. This glorious city is composed of many families – the Montague’s, the Capulet’s, the Macbeth’s, the MacDuff’s, the Aguecheeks, the Fortanbras, the Whitmore’s, and many many more. Too many to name or count.

Many of these families argue and disagree about things. There’s almost always one thing that one family does or thinks that another family just cannot abide by.

It is in this turbulent city of families that we find The Merchant’s Building. The Merchant’s of Venice are selling their wares, lending or selling books, playing music, and much more – and people are constantly streaming in and out. It’s a marketplace of endless possibility.

In one section of The Merchant’s Building, is the Mozilla booth. Mozilla does and makes many things – but it’s probably best known for its Firefox jewelry. Mozilla is one of a small number of merchants giving away jewelry – and jewelry, in this building, is special: the more people wear your jewelry, the more of a voice you have at the Merchant’s Weekly Meeting, where the rules of the building are written and refined.

So what is special about this Mozilla merchant? Why should we wear their jewelry? There are certainly other merchants giving away jewelry a few booths down. What does Mozilla bring to the table?

For one thing, the jewelry is beautiful. And it makes you walk faster. And it’s got the latest features. And it makes it harder for sketchy people to follow you. And it doesn’t have a built-in tracking device recording which merchants you’re visiting. And you can add cool charms to it, and make it look exactly how you want it.

And another thing that’s unique to the Mozilla booth is that they’re composed of members of every single family in Venice. Every single family has at least one member working in the Mozilla booth. And what’s more – a bunch of these workers are volunteering their time and efforts to make this stuff!

Why? Why do they volunteer? And why do these family members work side by side with people their families might balk at, or sneer at?

Well, In the very center of the Mozilla booth, overhanging the whole thing, is… The Mission. The Mission is the guiding principals upon which the Mozilla booth operates. This is what these family members bury their gauntlets for. They work, sweat and bleed side by side for this mission. This is their connective tissue. This is what guides them when they vote and argue for things at the Merchant’s Weekly Meeting.

The other truly unique thing about the Mozilla booth is that there are no walls to it! You can walk right in, and watch the craftspeople make jewelry! Heck, you can sit right down at a bench and somebody will show you how to make some yourself. They’ll guide you, and they’ll critique you, and soon, somebody will be wearing a piece of jewelry that you made.

The greatest debates also occur within the Mozilla booth. People stand on soap boxes and give their opinions about jewelry, or other merchandise – or merchandise practices. People say what they think out loud, and perhaps print it on a t-shirt and wear it. Sometimes, discussions get heated, but level thinking usually prevails because these Mozillians are an unusually bright bunch.

ACT I

There is a leadership selection underway. Someone needs to be the Chief of Business Affairs (or CBA) in the Mozilla booth. The current chief, Jay, has been holding the position as an interim chief, and the Board of Business Affairs is trying to select someone to take the position permanently.

Two members of this board already have their bags packed – for a while now, they’ve been neglecting other interests of theirs, and after this chief is selected, they feel they need to do other things.

Enter Brendan Eich. Brendan Eich is chief craftsperson of the makers of jewelry in the Mozilla booth. He’s a brilliant and widely respected craftsperson himself, having invented some of the amazing techniques that are used by all serious jewelry makers. He is also one of the founders of the Mozilla booth, having set it up with Mitchell Baker.

The Board of Business Affairs selects Brendan to be the next Chief of Business Affairs.

They announce this, and there is much applause! People clap Brendan on the back. Many craftspeople are pleased that one of their own will be in charge.

The two board members, as they’ve agreed to, take their bags, salute, and walk off out of the booth and on to other things.

A third board member leaves as well, but for reasons not related to what I describe below.

Suddenly, several Montague’s and Montague supporters in the Mozillian booth grow concerned. They recall that several years ago, Brendan had donated $1000 dollars to a law that supported Capulet values – a law which impacted their rights. The Montague’s and Montague supporters grow concerned that someone who supports this Capulet law is not fit to be Chief of a booth that houses all of the families, Montague’s included.

Several of these Montague’s raise these concerns out loud. This is not unusual in the Mozilla booth, as most concerns are raised out loud – and, as usual, debate begins. Brendan states that he will 100% abide by the Mozilla participation guidelines, and what’s more, began supporting a project that a Montague in the Mozilla booth has been working on – to bring more Montague’s into the booth.

Vigorous debate continues, as is the Mozilla booth custom.

However, as the booth lets anybody in, and the debate can be heard outside of the booth, several Montague’s and Montague supporters hear these concerns and start passing the message along to one another – a Capulet has been selected to be the CBA!

Many of these Montague’s are reasonable, and say and write reasonable arguments about why they are concerned, and why Brendan may not be the right choice as CBA.

ACT II

A few meters away, the Cupid booth overhears all of this concern from the Montague’s. Perhaps they really are Montague supportors (or, more likely, they just wanted to perk up business), but they suddenly decide to take a stand. For people who try to come into their booth wearing Firefox jewelry, they have to read a big sign that tells them about why the Cupid booth believes that restricting the rights of Montague’s is terrible, and that the Mozilla booth is terrible for making a Capulet the CBA. They tell the people wearing Firefox jewelry that they should probably wear other things.

And so some people start to take off their Firefox jewelry. Some Montague’s take it off angrily, and smash it into the ground – stomping it with their feet, creating a big dust cloud.

Enter Iago, and his team of writers. There are many writers and story-sellers in the Merchant’s Building, but Iago is one of those writers that just wants people to listen to him. He likes to twist words and make things up, or to insinuate things that are not true. He saw the board members leaving the Mozilla booth and concocts some headlines, insinuating that they left in protest of Brendan’s support of the Capulet laws. He also writes about how all of the Mozillians in the booth were not supporting Brendan’s appointment as CBA (which is not true – it’s true that some were concerned and questioned the wisdom of his appointment, but certainly not all). He writes and he writes, and his messengers pass copies and leaflets around. Montague’s and Montague supporters read these leaflets, or hear people talking about them, and they grow very concerned. More Montague’s start to take off their Firefox jewelry.

Some Montague’s start to engage with Mozillians and try to figure out what is happening. As always, each family has calm and reasonable people to converse with – and that’s always welcome in the Mozilla booth.

However, every family also has their groundlings. The groundlings are the members of a family who are always looking for a fight. Always looking for blood. Always hoping an actor will forget their lines, and will shout distracting things at them to make it happen. They always have a bag of rotten fruit and vegetables with them to throw. Some of them just like to make trouble.

Every family has their groundlings. You’ve probably met some yourself.

The groundlings start to hear these rumors that Iago has been spreading around, copied and recopied, distorted and mutilated – and they see the signs at the Cupid booth.

And they rush the Mozilla booth! They start throwing rotten fruit and vegetables, and they tear off their Firefox jewelry, and swear to never wear it again! They gnash their teeth, and they rip out their own hair in a rage, and they scream and yell and make so much noise – it’s almost impossible for the craftspeople in the Mozilla booth to work!

A tempest of Montague rage was upon the Mozilla booth.

ACT III

After several hours of this, Brendan addresses the crowd outside, and speaks to some storytellers (Iago and his team are among them – he always is).

They ask him if he renounces Capulet ways, or if he will apologize for the Montague rights that were impacted by the Capulet law that he helped fund.

And Brendan says something along the lines of “I don’t think that’s helpful to discuss. I don’t think that’s relevant here. I’m not going to run this booth as if everybody in here were Capulets – I helped make this booth, I know that it’s composed of many families, and I know how it operates.”

But Iago and the groundlings were not satisfied. They put up signs and placards claiming that anybody wearing Firefox jewelry is supporting the Capulets!

The Mozillians look at all of the broken and stomped-on jewelry on the market ground. All their work, being trampled. If this continues, their ability to improve things for all families at the Merchant’s Weekly Meeting will fade. Their ability to enact their Mission will fade. They are agitated, discouraged, upset, angry, sad, anxious, confused – a cocktail of emotion playing pretty much the entire spectrum.

Brendan’s speech had not done anything to quell the groundlings. And Iago could smell blood, and was not going to stop writing about Brendan or Mozilla.

The other leaders look to Brendan. What will we do?

And Brendan said, “This noise is getting absurdly loud. How are we supposed to work under these conditions? There’s no way we can enact the mission like this.”

And Brendan steps onto the proscenium, and says:

To leave, or not to leave, that is the question—
Whether ’tis Nobler in the mind to suffer
The Slings and Arrows of outrageous Fortune,
Or to take Arms against a Sea of troubles,
And by opposing end them?

And so, after much thought, he takes arms. He sacrifices, and he chooses to leave the booth – the booth he helped plant into the ground over 15 years ago. The booth he helped build, the jewelry and techniques he helped craft.

“I think if I leave, you folks might have a chance to keep the mission going.”

And so he leaves, to the heartbreak of many Mozillians, and to the cheering of the Montague groundlings outside.

ACT IV

Several of the more sensible Montague’s watch Brendan leave and wonder if perhaps the groundlings in their family have made them look petty and vindictive. Some of them are also sad that Brendan left the Mozilla booth – all they wanted from him was an apology, they say. That would have sufficed, they say. They didn’t expect or want him to leave the whole booth.

But the damage is done, and Brendan has left. There is no chief craftsperson, and there is no CBA. Holy shit.

The Mozillians in the booth start to get back to work, since the cheers of the Montague’s outside are much easier to work against as a backdrop than the booing, hissing and food-throwing. A bunch of Montague’s dust off their stomped Firefox jewelry (or grab new copies!) and put them back on proudly. Others are happy with the new jewelry they got, and don’t care about the Mission. Still others never took off the Firefox jewelry, but said they did. And now they wear it publicly again, proudly.

But suddenly, the Capulets and Capulet supporters in and around the Mozilla booth look at this gaping void where Brendan was and sense injustice. This was wrong, they cry! This man should not have been chased out of here!

Vigorous debate begins, as is the Mozilla booth custom.

And reasonable Capulets say and write reasonable things about why they think it was wrong for Brendan to have left.

And Iago, who never really left the area, hears all of this, and smells more blood in the air. He takes his poison pen, and writes stories about how Brendan was forcibly removed from the Mozilla booth by an angry mob of Montague’s. He writes that, like Cesar, Brendan was heard gasping “Et tu, Brute?” as he was stabbed by his fellow senators – or, like King Hamlet, poisoned and betrayed by the people closest to him.

But as usual, Iago gets this completely wrong. Not that he cares or bothers to check. What a douche. And LOUD too, holy smokes. And people listen to Iago, and read what he writes, and hear what he says, and the rumours abound!

And a second tempest starts to brew.

ACT V

Many reasonable Capulets, both inside and outside of the Mozilla booth are concerned about what this means for them. Does this mean that Capulets aren’t allowed to become CBA’s? That’s certainly against the inclusiveness guidelines, is it not? And much debate resonated, as is the Mozilla way.

But, as you recall, every family has their groundlings, and the Capulets are no exception. The Capulet groundlings heard the rumours that Iago and his ilk were slinging, and they gnashed their teeth, and they pulled out their hair.

“YOU KILLED BRENDAN”, the groundings howled at the Mozilla booth.

“No, he left on his own accord to save us and the mission,” some Mozillians said with sadness.

“NO HE DIDN’T, HE WAS BETRAYED AND MURDERED BY HIS CLOSEST ALLIES!” the groundlings yelled back.

“No, that’s simply not true. He left on his own accord in an attempt to save the booth and the mission.”

And the reasonable Capulets understood this, and they understood the mindblowing complexities of this whole clusterfuck. And they spoke with reason and passion.

The Mozillian craftspeople got up from their work making jewelry to talk to these Capulets, and the supporters of the Capulets. And many were very reasonable and calm – but the groundlings among them were vicious and yelled and made so much noise. In some ways, their rage was indistinguishable from the Montegue groundling rage, which I believe is some kind of irony.

And, as you’d expect, the Capulet groundlings, like all groundlings, love blood. They love a fight. And they tore off their Firefox jewelry, and they stamped it into the ground. Vegetables and rotten fruit started to be thrown at the Mozilla booth. Again.

And the Mozillians in the booth looked at each other. They looked at the gaping void where Brendan used to stand. They all hugged one another, and comforted one another, as fruit and vegetables slammed into them and their works.

And this is where we currently are, I believe.

Epilogue

If these ramblings have offended,
Think but this, and all is mended,
That you have but slumber’d here
While these visions did appear.
And this weak and idle theme,
No more yielding but a dream,
Gentles, do not reprehend:
if you pardon, we will mend:
And, as I am an honest Mike,
I do yet miss this Brendan Eich.
Now to ‘scape the serpent’s tongue,
We will make amends ere long;
Else the Mike a liar call;
So, good night unto you all.
Give me your hands, if we be friends,
And Robin shall restore amends.

For a less silly and more sober analysis of what happened, I suggest reading this next.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Nick Cameron: Anger

Mozilla planet - mo, 07/04/2014 - 07:03
There was a lot of anger about Brendan being appointed CEO. There has been a lot of anger since he quit. It is in no way my place to tell people when they should and should not be angry. One of the big points made by progressive movements is that everyone has a right to get angry about things which affect them and people who aren't affected shouldn't tell people not to be angry. Doing so is a control tactic and just generally unfair (especially where it intersects with myths and stereotypes - 'the gay agenda', 'the angry black woman', etc.). I agree. It is one reason I said nothing much about the whole affair. Better for me to listen.

Still, after all this has played out (hopefully), I am left feeling a bit angry myself. And a lot disappointed. Previously, I have mostly agreed with the progressive movements (feminism, LGBT rights, anti-racism, and so forth). When I have not agreed, I have often had my mind changed. I have learnt a lot and I have a great respect for many people in these movements. It feels bad to be on the wrong side of that. It seems to me that the subtlety in the discussion was lost - assumptions were made, opinions were fought for, there was not much attempt to establish empathy and tolerance, nor to accurately learn the specifics of the situation.

Back to anger. Though it is important not to tell people when they are allowed to get angry or what that anger should look like, I would like to suggest how that anger should be used. Anger can be constructive - it is one of the most motivating human emotions and has led to great changes over the years. It can also be amazingly destructive with no purpose - from a child's tantrum to pretty much every war ever fought. Sometimes it is good, emotionally, to get angry and break things. But we must try to put some thought into what gets broken. It was in large part anger that brought LGBT (and other civil) rights to where they are today. We need more of that, and less just breaking stuff, even if it makes us feel better.

In the last couple of weeks we've seen a lot of (justified) anger, but the result has not been positive. Things got broken, but nothing has changed for the better. A small, non-profit organisation which fights for freedom and privacy on the internet against corporate interests and overbearing governments has been damaged in many ways. All to harm a man who made a semi-public donation to an admittedly odious cause. I can't think of anyone who's life has got better from this, maybe some CEOs of other companies who probably have private views worse than Brendan's, but weren't as honest about declaring them.
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Nicholas Nethercote: A story about Brendan Eich

Mozilla planet - mo, 07/04/2014 - 04:33

I attended a Mozilla work week a couple of years ago at Mozilla’s Mountain View office. There was a dinner event in San Francisco and, by chance, I ended up in Andreas Gal’s car, along with Brendan Eich and someone else (who, alas, I cannot remember now).

The destination was the California Academy of Sciences, a science museum in San Francisco, which was about a 45 minute drive away. Off we headed. Unfortunately, we headed off without closely checking where our destination was, and we somehow got the Academy of Sciences confused with the Exploratorium, another science museum in San Francisco. When we arrived and found it closed, we had to regroup.

Andreas confidently interrogated his car’s GPS unit and procured a new address that fortunately wasn’t too far away. Fifteen minutes later, we found ourselves in a residential area, outside a building that obviously wasn’t going to be hosting a dinner for several dozen MoCo employees.

Andreas again consulted his GPS unit for a new address. Unfortunately, this one
was on the far side of the city. Undeterred, we crawled through early-evening
traffic in the busiest parts of San Francisco — I’m pretty sure we actually
passed Union Square — to another address. Again, as soon as we laid eyes upon it, it clearly wasn’t the right destination.

It turns out there are several institutions in San Francisco with the words
“Academy” and “Science” or “Sciences” in their names, and we were doing a tour of all the wrong ones. On our fourth roll of the dice, Andreas found what ultimately was the correct address, and we crawled back to our final destination, which turned out — groan — to be not that far from the Exploratorium. We staggered in, two hours after we started, eliciting several comments of “what on earth took you guys so long?”

I remember being frustrated at the time — Andreas and Brendan were locals!
They should have known better. But now…

I’ve worked for Mozilla for over five years, but I visit California infrequently, and I’ve only had a chance to talk with Brendan in person a few times. The only
thing I remember from the conversation during the car trip is that at one point we were talking about the US economy and Brendan made a confident proclamation about the bond market — I can’t even remember what it was — that I wasn’t sure I agreed with but I wasn’t sure I could explain why I disagreed. It’s funny the details that stick.

This conversation was with Brendan the person — not Brendan the CTO, not
Brendan the inventor of JavaScript, not my boss’s boss’s boss, and not somebody who made a donation. Just Brendan, a person who knew a lot of stuff, had some interesting experiences and some strong opinions, and was good to chat to. It’s a small story, but it’s one I’ll remember.

Comments on this post are open, but be warned that I will delete without hesitation any comments that re-hash the CEO controversy of the past two weeks, or that I find rude or objectionable in any way. If you want to discuss the controversy, or be rude or objectionable, there are many other places on the web that you can do so.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Blacklisted at Mozilla - Wall Street Journal

Nieuws verzameld via Google - mo, 07/04/2014 - 00:02

Wall Street Journal

Blacklisted at Mozilla
Wall Street Journal
The resignation under pressure late last week by Mozilla CEO Brendan Eich for opposing gay marriage is a disturbing episode for corporate governance as well as for the traditional tolerance of other points of view in American life. Some of our liberal ...
Mozilla denies pushing CEO to resignZDNet
Mozilla's CEO Showed the Cost of Disclosure Laws by Crossing the Satan ...Forbes
Mozilla Registers Swell Of Negative Feedback Following Eich OusterFox News (blog)
The Hill (blog) -Economic Times -N.C. State University Technician Online
alle 59 nieuwsartikelen »Google Nieuws
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Robert O'Callahan: Responsible Self-Censorship

Mozilla planet - snein, 06/04/2014 - 23:41

People may be wondering why I, as one of the most notorious Christians at Mozilla, have been silent during the turmoil of recent days. It is simply because I haven't been able to think of anything to say that won't cause more harm in the current environment. It is not because I am afraid, malicious, or suffering from a lack of freedom of speech in any way. As soon as I have the environment and the words to say something helpful, I will.

By "the current environment" I mean the situation where many of the culture warriors of all stripes are picking over every utterance looking for something to be angry against or something to fuel their anger against others.

Update Actually, right after posting that, I thought of something to say.

I have never loved the people of Mozilla as much as I do right now. With just a few exceptions, your commitment and grace under fire is inspiring and (in the old-fashioned sense) awesome. I'm glad I'm here for this.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Boris Zbarsky: Speech and consequences

Mozilla planet - snein, 06/04/2014 - 23:39

I've seen the phrase "freedom of speech does not mean freedom from consequences" a lot recently. This is clearly true. However, it's also clearly true that freedom of speech does in fact mean freedom from some consequences. As a simple example, the First Amendment to the US Constitution and its associated jurisprudence is all about delineating some consequences one must be free of for speech to be considered free.

The question then becomes this: which consequences should one be free of when speaking? I am not a lawyer, and this is not a legal analysis (though some of these consequences are pretty clearly illegal in their own right, though not readily actionable if performed anonymously), but rather a moral one. I would consider at least the following consequences that involve private action only as unacceptable restraints on freedom of speech:

  1. Physical violence against the speaker or their family, friends, or associates.
  2. Threats of such physical violence. This most definitely includes death threats.
  3. Destruction of or damage to the property of the speaker or their family, friends, or associates.
  4. Harassment (bullhorns in the night, incessant phone calls, etc) of the family, friends, or associates of the speaker. I don't feel as absolutely about the speaker him/herself, because the definition of "harassment" is rather vague. While the above examples with bullhorns and phones seem morally repugnant to me as applied to the speaker, there may be other things that I consider harassment but others consider OK as a response to a speaker. There's a lot more gray area here than in items 1-3.

This is not meant to be an exhaustive list; these are the things that came to mind off the top of my head.

It's clear to me that a large number of people out there disagree with me at least about item 2 and item 4 of the list above in practice. They may or may not perform such actions themselves, but they will certainly excuse such actions on the part of others by claiming that freedom of speech does not mean freedom from consequences. For these particular consequences, I do not accept that argument, and I sincerely hope the people involved are simply unaware of the actions they're excusing, instead of actively believing that the consequences listed above are compatible with the exercise of free speech.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Nick Cameron: Marriage

Mozilla planet - snein, 06/04/2014 - 22:24
I have a lot of thoughts and feelings around the recent Brendan/CEO kerfuffle. Mostly though I think it has been better to listen than to talk, so I haven't blogged about it. I will just say that I am very unhappy with the result of it all. I would also like to voice my thoughts on marriage.

One element of misunderstanding, it seems to me, is about whether marriage is important. For some people, marriage is viewed as a purely religious/cultural construct which should be dictated by their religion/culture. They don't see why it is so important for gay people (or sometimes other minority groups) to be able to marry. Especially if alternatives such as civil unions exist. They have the privilege of not being denied the marriage of their choice.

In contrast, for many people marriage is a large and practical thing since it can affect things such as immigration status, benefits, hospital visitation, etc. (As well as having their relationships treated as second class in the eyes of the wider society, of course). In my view, it is unfortunate that the practical side of things exists. I am lucky enough to live in a country where marriage is (mostly) not important in that way, and I prefer it greatly.

Marriage is a wonderful thing, and I would not deny it to anybody who wants it. In my view, it should not involve either the state or any cultural or religious institution. I find the fact that a couple has to be married by a third party weird. In my ideal world, the people being married would only have to marry themselves to each other, and no-one else would get a say. Marriage should simply be a public declaration of commitment in front of the people who are important to those being married. No-one should have to officiate or register it, and no-one should have to say who can or who can't get married. And certainly, being married should have no effects on your legal or moral life.

To clarify, I don't think marriage should lead to tax breaks or extra respect from any institution. I don't believe adultery should be judged any better or worse because of it, etc.

Once marriage brings material benefit from the state or the legal system, and once marriage is bestowed by an institution rather than being freely chosen, it becomes just another tool for enforcing established power. By allowing powerful groups of people to bestow benefits either social or material on individuals, it becomes open to corruption. It becomes something minorities have to fight for and which exclusive majorities seek to prevent others obtaining. That an expression of love and commitment ends up like this is immensely saddening, and says a lot about human society.

And don't even get me started about the commercial side of things. The whole wedding industry makes me feel sick.
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla's CEO Mess: Bad Choice, Worse Outcome - The Fiscal Times

Nieuws verzameld via Google - snein, 06/04/2014 - 21:18

Washington Post (blog)

Mozilla's CEO Mess: Bad Choice, Worse Outcome
The Fiscal Times
Even miles away from Silicon Valley, you could see this coming. Brendan Eich resigned from the Mozilla Corporation on Thursday, less than two weeks after being elevated to the chief executive's job at the maker of the popular Firefox open-source web ...
How Mozilla Lost Its CEONew Yorker (blog)
Brendan Eich, Mozilla, and the right to be wrongWashington Post (blog)
Mozilla CEO Resigns Amid Furor, Opening Free Speech DebateTop Tech News
SiliconANGLE (blog)
alle 593 nieuwsartikelen »Google Nieuws
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

How Mozilla Lost Its CEO - New Yorker (blog)

Nieuws verzameld via Google - snein, 06/04/2014 - 20:21

New Yorker (blog)

How Mozilla Lost Its CEO
New Yorker (blog)
When Brendan Eich stepped down as the C.E.O. of Mozilla, on Thursday, after a mere two weeks on the job, it was perhaps the least surprising C.E.O. departure ever. Eich was one of the co-founders of Mozilla—which makes open-source software, including ...
Mozilla's CEO Mess: Bad Choice, Worse OutcomeThe Fiscal Times
Personality and Change Inflamed Mozilla CrisisNew York Times
OK, Cupid, Where's the Line? Mozilla CEO's Exit Over Gay Rights Shows Split in ...Bloomberg
Los Angeles Times -NewsFactor Network -Inferse
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