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Gervase Markham: MOSS Conflict of Interest Rules

Mozilla planet - to, 28/09/2017 - 13:05

We decided to implement a lightweight Conflict of Interest policy for the MOSS Committees, not because we have had problems, but because we’d like never to have them :-) They are based loosely on the Wikipedia ones, and are here for anyone to use who wants them (CC-0).

MOSS Conflict of Interest Rules (v1.0)

As a committee member, you must:

1. Disclose actively if you are receiving, will receive, or have received in the past 5 years payment or anything of value from an applicant or their project;

2. Disclose actively if any family member, spouse, partner, business associate, significant other, close friend, or their organizations or employers would benefit from the approval of an application;

3. Answer fully and honestly any relevant and appropriate questions about potential conflicts of interest when discussing an application;

4. Disclose actively if your approval or disapproval of an application could be perceived by others or the public as improper, because even the perception of a conflict or unauthorized personal gain needs to be disclosed;

5. Not approve applications for personal gain.

Under the above rules, a person should “disclose actively” a potential or actual conflict of interest. To “disclose actively” means (1) to report the conflict to the MOSS Administrator; and (2) to do so explicitly and as soon as the conflict is known.

The MOSS Administrator will assess the conflict and, if it is judged to be material, will report it or request that the member report it to the committee.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Air Mozilla: Kernel Recipes 28 Sept. (Full Day)

Mozilla planet - to, 28/09/2017 - 10:00

Kernel Recipes 28 Sept. (Full Day) Share Kernel Contributions and Community

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Air Mozilla: MozFest 2017 - Volunteer Meetup 27th September

Mozilla planet - wo, 27/09/2017 - 20:30

MozFest 2017 - Volunteer Meetup 27th September Meetup for Mozilla Festival 2017 Volunteers

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Air Mozilla: The Joy of Coding - Episode 114

Mozilla planet - wo, 27/09/2017 - 19:00

The Joy of Coding - Episode 114 mconley livehacks on real Firefox bugs while thinking aloud.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Air Mozilla: Weekly SUMO Community Meeting September 27, 2017

Mozilla planet - wo, 27/09/2017 - 18:00

Weekly SUMO Community Meeting September 27, 2017 This is the SUMO weekly call

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

The Firefox Frontier: Get ready for Firefox Quantum

Mozilla planet - wo, 27/09/2017 - 16:10

The new Firefox is on its way and we can’t wait to share it with you. So we’re not. Waiting that is. Firefox Quantum is here in Beta and Developer … Read more

The post Get ready for Firefox Quantum appeared first on The Firefox Frontier.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

The Mozilla Blog: New Film, Magazine: The Uncertain Future of Artificial Intelligence and IoT

Mozilla planet - wo, 27/09/2017 - 14:55
Mozilla is releasing a short film and launching a new magazine. They explore the impact of a pervasive internet on our lives and our future

 

What happens when AI virtual assistants can mimic our voices, learn our habits, and double as our drinking buddies?

It’s a future that doesn’t seem far off. It’s also a future Mozilla is exploring in a new short film and with a new bi-annual magazine.

Today, Mozilla is releasing a short film commissioned from Superflux titled “Our Friends Electric,” and launching a new magazine titled DING, to explore the impact of connected devices on our lives, our society, and our future.

The movie and magazine cover a wide range: You’ll see a stubborn AI bickering with its owner. You’ll read about anti-corruption bots in Brazil, and the harmful impact of connected devices on the environment. And you’ll hear from one of the founders of interaction design, Gillian Crampton Smith.

The work is led by Mozilla’s Open IoT Studio, a research studio seeking to advance internet health in emerging technologies.

“It’s imperative that we go beyond what’s possible with technology, and instead consider what’s responsible,” says Michelle Thorne, who leads Mozilla’s Open IoT Studio. “We wanted to critically engage in debates about the Internet of Things while offering something constructive in return. For example, we researched the current landscape of voice assistants and found that most devices today only encourage you to consume. We asked: what if they could also help you create?”

The Film

Mozilla collaborated with London-based design agency Superflux to create “Our Friends Electric,” a six-minute film about the future of voice-enabled AI. The film features virtual assistants that grow with you, AI that speaks on your behalf, and a philosophically-minded companion that accidently orders 2,000 pounds of organic horse manure.

The film officially premiered at the London Digital Design Weekend at the V&A museum on Saturday, September 23.

The Magazine

We founded DING magazine because we saw a gap in the practice of slow, considered making and the breakneck speed of technology. We wanted to anthologize the sprawling online conversations and provide a place of reflection for people interested in crafting technology in more responsible ways. It is a place of refuge to discuss internet health and emerging technologies — slowly, sustainably, and in print. Our inaugural issue is dedicated to the topic of craft and features a range of stories, including:

  • An interview with Gillian Crampton Smith, one of the founders of interaction design. She describes the practice of designing the right thing — and designing the thing right. As virtual and physical worlds converge, Gillian argues that we need craft to inform how we interact with connected objects

 

  • An overview of recent ethical technology projects, like Operação Serenata de Amor, an anti-corruption bot in Brazil

 

  • An essay on the invisible costs of connected devices, from the graveyards of the cargo ships that carry our electronics to the cartels that shorten the lifespan of everyday objects. The essay is authored by Vladan Joler of the University of Novi Sad

DING will publish twice yearly. Read the first-ever edition »

About Mozilla’s Open IoT Studio

Mozilla’s Open IoT Studio is part think tank, part open-source laboratory exploring and advocating for ethical IoT. It seeks a holistic viewpoint on how and why internet technologies are developed, and how they could be healthier.

The studio is a distributed community made up of dozens of technologists, activists, academics, and researchers around the globe.

The Open IoT Studio is part of the larger Mozilla Network — a global cohort fighting for a healthy internet. We’re working toward a web that’s open, decentralized, safe, and secure for all, with projects like this and like CommonVoice.

The device prototypes from “Our Friends Electric,” a short film about IoT and AI

The post New Film, Magazine: The Uncertain Future of Artificial Intelligence and IoT appeared first on The Mozilla Blog.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Firefox UX: Just another day

Mozilla planet - wo, 27/09/2017 - 12:03
Because we only like to reinvent the wheel when we have toBeta release

For many, today is just another day. Well, not for me, my team, and all the other people who spent the last six months on version 57 of the browser, the new Firefox Quantum. Today, we’re going into Beta release with the new UI which adheres to the new Photon visual language. If you feel your head spinning, you’re right. Let’s put one thing after another.

Style guide vs. design systems

My name is Emanuela Damiani, and in few days, it will be one year since I began working at Mozilla.

When I joined, I was asked to focus my attention on two products in particular: add-ons and the new design system.

Building a design system is not an easy job. First, what is a Design System? What is it not? What are the differences between a style guide and a pattern library? All those questions were buzzing in my mind like one hundred bees.

<figcaption>A design system is not a one-man job. When you I say ‘we’, I mean: Tina, Tori, Helen, Amin, Markus, Philip and myself.</figcaption>

Our team is not too big, or too small. It has six members, distributed from Vancouver to Taipei, passing through central Europe, and with just one person able to work 100% on the design system. Since the beginning, we have tried to use Slack as much as is possible to make it easy for anyone to give feedback and fill the gap of not being able to share time together.

When we all met together at the beginning of November last year, there was a zombie Firefox style guide in the wild.

We wanted to learn from that failure. We spent time interviewing anyone who worked on that project. What was the challenge? Why did the few things in the style guide feel so different from everything present in the product?

<figcaption>A design system success is not connected with the launch of style-guide or a UI-kit. The real success happens when your design system is adopted in your products.</figcaption>

One main point of failure of the previous style guide was in the process taken by the team. Without a complete inventory, the team was documenting and improving at the same time, ending up with some excellent and delightful insights for future development but nothing truly actionable for the present or representative of the product.

Plus, the style-guide had a strong focus only on the desktop, ignoring the complex ecosystem where Firefox products live.

Photon: from a visual refresh to a visual language“We started from the existing style guide, we checked if the identified macro areas were still valid, and we analyzed (or looked at) other existing design systems that were around for a while.”— Amin

Meanwhile, somewhere else in the organization, a group of people decided it was time to give all the cool improvements on the backend (a.k.a. Quantum) a nice visual refresh. The code name for this project was Photon.

That was the perfect opportunity for us. We started from there. All of the visual changes are expected to be in the product, overruling previous decisions. We had to start somewhere, so we started there.

Our first job was to understand all of the design decisions and be ready to raise our hands if some choices contradicted each other or did not meet accessibility standards. We made them aware of the other projects, products, constraints, and needs of other teams so that the team in charge of the visual refresh would have a more broad understanding of the design and development requirements.

While we were documenting, we ended up actively co-designing what eventually became a real design language that supported multiple platforms and multiple products.

Design for Scale“The higher the expected visibility on parts of your work, the more important it is to align to Photon. If very limited visibility is expected, full alignment is of lower priority. Use platform components until you have time to align better.”— Design for Scale, Photon Design System

We wanted to have documentation that combines theory and resources where theories are principles, visual guidelines, and patterns, and resources are everything from visual assets to tokens, from demos to templates, and from tools to code.

But how might we build a successful design language that also able to feel native in all the different platforms? Designing for scale is a challenging, delicate task. We wanted to support people going through this task and provide written content to help them understand this principle and apply it.

Feedback, feedback, feedback“With every page, we added we learned, step by step — we learned how to structure pages, how to structure the whole system, and we learned how to align differences between individual design teams and how to get people to make decisions that can be structured and documented.”— Markus

While we’re building the design system, we never stop collecting feedback by everyone on the Firefox team. In the end, those people are our primary users.

We like to think of the design system as a tool, a tool which enables other people, designers and non-designers, to design. It saves time on digging into Sketch files, trying to find patterns from other designers, and fixing design issues like incoherency, accessibility across platforms, and localization.

During Mozilla’s June 2017 All Hands in San Francisco, we spent hours just talking with different product teams, asking for feedback. How are they using the system? How is the system relevant for them?

<figcaption>When you ask “Can you bring somebody from your team?” and 15 people show up, you know you’re doing something right.</figcaption>Photon Design System: today

First, we gave it a name: Photon — it just makes sense, right?

Three months ago, we had a lot of visual decisions documented on the website, and many of those decisions were already on the Nightly release, but the design of our site didn’t really seem to reflect any of it. So, we applied all the principles documented in the product. The Photon Design System website today reveals how we use it in the wild.

We are working on the components and patterns. Day to day, our job resembles a detective’s. We follow leads in all the products and identify the ones that can bring extra value to the Firefox team. Where we see complexity, we act to simplify.

We want everyone who builds for Firefox to use the design system in their everyday workflow. Using the design system should be not more than easy, it should feel natural. To accomplish that, we’re focusing not only on the content but also on building tools and resources.

Final thoughts

For many, today is just another day. For the Photon Design System team, it’s when we see the system’s value realized.

<figcaption>Photon Design System</figcaption>

A design system is not built overnight but shaped gradually through our daily practices. It evolves every day — or maybe every week — and most importantly, it’s never done.

Just another day was originally published in Firefox User Experience on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Air Mozilla: Kernel Recipes 27 Sept. (Full Day)

Mozilla planet - wo, 27/09/2017 - 10:00

Kernel Recipes 27 Sept. (Full Day) Share Kernel Contributions and Community

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Cameron Kaiser: TenFourFox FPR3 available ... when SourceForge is (also: Fx57 is yugly)

Mozilla planet - ti, 26/09/2017 - 20:30
Sorry, everyone. I am well aware that SourceForge is down and you can't download TenFourFox FPR3 (or, for that matter, Classilla) right now. I don't have any control over that. If this keeps up more than a day or two, we'll see if we can get alternative hosting up somewhere.

Also, my office PC (Windows 7) is now on the Firefox 57 beta and it's ... really garish and ugly looking. Switching the layout to Compact and the theme to Light helps a little with the tab bar, but the KITT loading tab animation is distracting, the icons manage to be intrusive and bland simultaneously, and the new logo is a bad LSD trip (to say nothing of the fact half my extensions stopped working, and while I knew that was coming, most of them have no replacement because the APIs don't yet exist). While I thought Australis was a step backwards in terms of utility, at least it had some design consistency. Photon, on the other hand, is all over the place and it's an unwelcome change on top of everything else. I'm almost afraid to update Firefox on the MacBook Air.

But, to be fair, it is palpably faster. Much faster. I certainly can't argue that. Nevertheless, the compromises made are such that if it weren't for Google's relentless commitment to snoop on everything I do, I have to candidly say I'm not sure I'd be sticking with the new Firefox.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Air Mozilla: Mozilla Curriculum Workshop, Fall Sept. 2017

Mozilla planet - ti, 26/09/2017 - 18:00

Mozilla Curriculum Workshop, Fall Sept. 2017 Join us for a special, series finale “ask me anything” (AMA) episode of the Mozilla Curriculum Workshop at noon ET, on Tuesday, September 26th, 2017....

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Air Mozilla: Mozilla Curriculum Workshop, Fall Sept. 2017

Mozilla planet - ti, 26/09/2017 - 18:00

Mozilla Curriculum Workshop, Fall Sept. 2017 Join us for a special, series finale “ask me anything” (AMA) episode of the Mozilla Curriculum Workshop at noon ET, on Tuesday, September 26th, 2017....

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Hacks.Mozilla.Org: Firefox Quantum Developer Edition: the fastest Firefox ever with Photon UI and better tooling

Mozilla planet - ti, 26/09/2017 - 16:05

Firefox Quantum is now available in Developer Edition, and this Firefox is fast.

As a reader of the Hacks blog, you may be familiar with Project Quantum, our attempt to refactor, redesign, replace, and modernize the very core of Firefox. We’ve shipped many incremental improvements to Firefox in the past, but this release marks the first milestone where we believe Firefox fundamentally feels like a newer, better browser.

To celebrate, we gave Developer Edition a brand new logo:

Why does this feel like a brand new browser? Read on!

Firefox Quantum: Towards a next-gen browser

Developer Edition now includes “Quantum CSS,” an entirely new CSS engine written in Rust and based on the Servo parallel browser engine project. Additionally, the “Quantum Flow” team tracked down and fixed 369 performance bugs in Firefox, with a special focus on responsiveness and UI interactions. Lastly, the “Quantum DOM” project began overhauling how Firefox prioritizes work, responding more quickly to events like user input while delaying less urgent computations until the browser is idle.

The result? Compared to Firefox six months ago, today’s Developer Edition is twice as fast on benchmarks like Speedometer 2.0 that simulate the real-world performance of modern web applications.

Furthermore, Firefox is 64-bit and multi-process by default, and Firefox’s unique architecture allows it to take advantage of modern, multi-core processors while still respecting your available RAM. Meanwhile, the “Quantum Compositor” project significantly reduced crashes caused by buggy graphics drivers.

Photon: Firefox’s new UI

To complement Quantum, the Photon team rebuilt Firefox’s interface to be faster and more modern:

You’ll hear more about Photon in November, but highlights include redesigned menus, square tabs, and a new “Library” button that acts as a single place for your bookmarks, downloads, history, etc. By default, Photon combines the search and URL bars into a single widget, but the old style is only a preference away.

The “Activity Stream” project redesigned the New Tab Page to feature highlights from your recent history and bookmarks, as well as recommendations from Pocket. Of course, each of these content blocks are optional, and add-ons can completely replace the new tab page to create entirely different experiences.

We also refreshed form handling in Firefox, adding a brand new autofill feature and implementing built-in widgets for <input type=date> and <input type=time> elements.

Lastly, Firefox’s preferences were completely redesigned and are now searchable.

DevTools in 57: Redesigned and better than ever

Firefox Quantum: Developer Edition also includes a ton of refined, redesigned, and brand new developer tools.

A few highlights:

  • The Console, Debugger, and Network tabs are now implemented using standard web technologies, including React and Redux, as part of our “devtools.html” effort.
  • The Inspector gained tons of new features for working with CSS Grid, CSS Variables, toggling classes on elements, etc.
  • The Console now supports grouping messages and expanding / inspecting objects in-line.
  • The Debugger offers completely new ways to search, navigate, and debug projects.

And that’s not all. To read in greater depth about what’s new in Firefox Developer Tools, check out Developer Edition Devtools Update.

 

Project Quantum: There’s more to come

Today’s release is a major milestone in Project Quantum, but we’re not done. Future releases of Firefox will include Quantum Render, a brand new, GPU-optimized rendering pipeline based on Servo’s WebRender project, and Quantum DOM Scheduler, a new technique that ensures that tabs in the background can’t slow down your active tabs.

Try out Developer Edition today, or sign up to get notified when Firefox Quantum is released to mainline Firefox. Either way, stay tuned to the Hacks blog to learn more about Project Quantum!

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Hacks.Mozilla.Org: Developer Edition Devtools Update: Now with Photon UI

Mozilla planet - ti, 26/09/2017 - 16:05

Firefox 57 Developer Edition was just released! It’s such an advance that we’ve given this browser a new name: Firefox Quantum. This is a great opportunity to tell you about what the DevTools team has been up to since our last major update back in March.

DevTools visual update


Say hello to a complete visual refresh of both our Light and Dark themes, matching the new visual style of Firefox Quantum. (We call this UI Photon.) The new design is simpler, cleaner and has better contrast. We also updated all the syntax highlighting colors to improve text readability. Check out this in-depth blog post at Firefox Nightly News by our UX Designer Victoria Wang for more details and research that went into choosing just the right colors.

Inspector

CSS Grid is taking over the web, and DevTools are here to help you master grids. Head over to the new Layout panel in the Inspector, where the CSS Grid widget lists all of the grid containers on the page. The grid overlays have also been improved: they now show line numbers, area names and adapt to the most complex CSS transforms.

Ever been bugged by a DOM element showing up in an unexpected spot? The Layout panel shows detailed box-model information, with all properties relevant to positioning, including the offset parent.

There are too many goodies in the Layout panel to list here, so have a look at this recent post covering the layout panel in the new Inspector.

CSS Variables are now widely supported and ready to be used in the wild! The Inspector shows the current value of a variable on hover. It also explains why a variable has a given value for the selected element.

It’s super-useful to be able to add, remove, and togge classnames when debugging CSS. Now you can easily do this from the Inspector. Click on the “.cls” button to reveal all of the classes applied to the selected element. You can toggle any of them or add new ones.

Don’t remember all the possible values possible for font-variant? That’s ok, you shouldn’t have to! Our CSS auto-completion now returns many more values.

I want to highlight one last feature of the Inspector. If you work with test automation tools, you will like the new Copy XPath context-menu option. This feature used to be in Firebug, and we are really glad to bring it back to DevTools!

Console

We are shipping a new Console UI in Firefox Quantum (Firefox 57)! Joining the Debugger and the Network Monitor, the Console has been rewritten using modern web technologies such as React and Redux. Looking forward to your feedback!

The new Console allows you to inspect objects in context. When an object is logged in the console, you can simply expand it and explore its contents. Existing features of the previous UI, such as filters and network request details, have also been ported to this new front-end.

Console.group() and groupCollapsed() are super useful to make your logs more organized and readable. Modern frameworks’ loggers nicely group & format bursts of updates. You can now collapse log groups to see only what matters to you.

Did you know you could persist logs when navigating from page to page? The “Persist Logs” checkbox is now much easier to find, directly in the Console panel.

Debugger

Thanks to all the feedback received since the new Debugger was first released on Developer Edition, we are shipping it to all channels with Firefox 56. Thanks again for your help, let’s take a look at the main new features.

Outline View & Function Search

Debugging is often about finding the right method. The new debugger features an outline view, with links to all the methods defined in the current source. If you prefer searching, you can also use function search and quickly jump to any function.

Project Search

Speaking of search, the new Debugger introduces project search, a.k.a. “Find in all files”. Pretty useful if you need to find where this alert (“foo”) is coming from. This was one of our top requested features, we are very happy to ship it in Firefox 57.

Collapsed Framework Callstacks

Frameworks and libraries are everywhere in the Web landscape, and Firefox Developer Tools embrace this! The debugger now displays matching icons in callstacks for framework sources. Framework methods are also collapsed by default in callstacks, so no need to scroll through foreign method calls anymore. You can also enable blackboxing to completely forget about a file and never have to step through it.

Pinned (AST) Breakpoints

With pinned breakpoints, the Debugger will keep track of your breakpoints even when the code changes. You can move methods in your source files, and breakpoints will automatically stay on the correct statements.

Async Stepping

Async & await will change the way we write asynchronous code for the better. The Debugger can now seamlessly step-over or step-in with async functions.

If you want to follow more closely the (very active!) development of the Debugger, you should check out the weekly updates published by the team.

Source maps

Babel, SCSS, WebAssembly, TypeScript… Compiling JS and CSS is now common practice. As a result, the code that the browser uses looks pretty different from the original source files. We finally support sourcemaps in all our major tools, so you can focus on working with your original files.

Network Monitor

Scheme, timings, headers… Here are just some of the new Netmonitor columns! You can choose your own set of columns to see only what you want. The filter input also provides auto-completion based on the column names, to build powerful filter queries.

What does the ETag header mean? What is status code 502? The Netmonitor now links to MDN Web Docs to help you learn about request & response headers, status codes, timings etc…

Timings for DOMContentLoaded and load are crucial when analyzing the performance of a website. They are now clearly visible in the new status bar, next to the requests’ summary.

You can now toggle “Persist Logs” and “Disable cache” right from the Network Monitor UI. This is super handy when you need to inspect a POST request that triggers a page navigation!

Storage Inspector

Tired of typing localStorage.setItem in the Console? You can now add new cookies or localStorage entries directly in the Storage Inspector.

Last but not least, the Storage Inspector is now enabled by default for all channels!

Thanks everyone!

That was a long read, thanks for reading to the end. We hope you will enjoy the new features we are rolling out. Feedback welcome, find us on Slack or on #devtools at irc.mozilla.org. And a HUGE thank you to all the contributors: You are doing an amazing job on DevTools:

  • Abhinav Koppula
  • Adrien Enault
  • Adrien Pachkoff
  • Ahmed Towkir
  • anejaalisha
  • Bomsy (Hubert B Manilla)
  • Brennan Brisad
  • Christopher Phonis-Phine
  • Eric Skoglund
  • Espen Henriksen
  • Gabrielle Singhcadieux
  • Hemant Singh
  • Henri Kemppainen
  • Hossain Al Ikram
  • Jaideep Bhoosreddy
  • Leonardo Couto
  • Locke Chen
  • Maxwell
  • Mayank
  • Micah Tigley
  • Michael Kohler
  • Mike Park
  • Mohammed Yaseen Khan
  • nbeltran14
  • Tim Nguyen
  • Nick Fox
  • Nicolas Ouellet-Payeur
  • Oriol Brufau
  • Pinkney
  • Ragnis
  • Rahul Chaudhary
  • Ruben Schmidmeister
  • Ruturaj Vartak
  • Santiago Paez
  • Sebastian Zartner
  • Sheldon Roddick
  • Stanford Lockhart
  • Stefan Yohansson
  • Stoyan Dimitrov
  • Stylizit (Matt R)
  • Swapnesh Kumar Sahoo
  • Vangelis Katsikaros
  • Vera
  • Vincent Lequertier
  • Xavier ALT
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Air Mozilla: Embedded Recipes 26 Sept. (afternoon)

Mozilla planet - ti, 26/09/2017 - 16:00

Embedded Recipes 26 Sept. (afternoon) The first embedded conference in Paris

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Air Mozilla: Embedded Recipes 26 Sept. (afternoon)

Mozilla planet - ti, 26/09/2017 - 16:00

Embedded Recipes 26 Sept. (afternoon) The first embedded conference in Paris

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

The Mozilla Blog: Start Your Engines – Firefox Quantum Lands in Beta, Developer Edition

Mozilla planet - ti, 26/09/2017 - 15:14

Engines are important, both in cars and in browsers. That’s why we’re so revved up this morning – we’re releasing the Beta of a whole new Firefox, one that’s powered by a completely reinvented, modernized engine. Since the version number – 57 – can’t really convey the magnitude of the changes we’ve made, and how much faster this new Firefox is, we’re calling this upcoming release Firefox Quantum.

The journey to Firefox Quantum

Last October we announced Project Quantum, our effort to create a next-generation engine for modern computers, by leveraging technology from our Servo research project. Since then, our engineering team has been relentless in their focus on making Firefox incredibly fast.

Already this year we’ve launched several major improvements to Firefox that have it made it better than ever. For example, we’ve transformed Firefox to run using multiple processes, striking the “just right” balance between speed and memory usage. In addition, we’ve launched game-changing features like WebAssembly and WebVR, enabling super fast, near-native performance for web apps on the desktop and on VR headsets.

We’ve shipped a lot already, but we’ve been planning for many more projects to come together in Firefox Quantum.

Noticeably faster on many of the top websites

Firefox Quantum is such a big leap forward that you’ll feel it instantly, just browsing your favorite websites.

Turns out you can measure Firefox Quantum’s speed, too – our pit crew is kind of obsessed with a data-driven approach. One simple way of estimating browser performance is with Speedometer 2.0, a (still-in-development) benchmark that simulates modern web applications. Results vary based on the computer and apps you’re actively using, but one thing that’s relatively consistent is that Firefox Quantum is about 2X faster than Firefox was a year ago.

We encourage you to make your own comparisons, but here’s a short video that captures our observations when comparing Firefox Quantum and Chrome on various websites. Firefox Quantum is often perceivably faster.

Webpagetest running on Acer Aspire E15. Performance varies based on several factors.

 

So how we did we make Firefox Quantum so fast?

Firefox has historically run mostly on just one CPU core, but Firefox Quantum takes advantage of multiple CPU cores in today’s desktop and mobile devices much more effectively. This improved utilization of your computer’s hardware makes Firefox Quantum dramatically faster. One example: we’ve developed a breakthrough approach to laying out pages: a super fast CSS engine written in Rust, a systems programming language that Mozilla pioneered. Firefox’s new CSS engine runs quickly, in parallel across multiple CPU cores, instead of running in one slower sequence on a single core. No other browser can do this.

We’ve also improved Firefox so that the tab you’re actively using downloads and runs before other tabs you have open in the background. This prioritization of your active tab, along with Firefox’s “just right” multi-process architecture, results in Firefox Quantum often being faster than Chrome, while consuming roughly 30% less RAM.

In addition, for the past several months we’ve run a browser-wide initiative to zap any instances of slowness you might encounter while using Firefox. So far our pit crew has fixed 468 of these issues, both small papercuts and big bottlenecks.

 

Introducing the fast and fluid Photon design

It’s not enough to perform well on benchmarks, it’s also important that our users feel like they’re using a well thought out and high performance product.  To reflect all these under-the-hood improvements, we’ve refined and rebuilt Firefox’s user interface through our Photon project. Our talented team of designers and user researchers spent time understanding how users perceive web browsers, and in particular where they felt they were waiting on their browsers.

With the new design, Firefox leaps ahead with a new interface that reflects today’s reality of High DPI displays and users who are more task focused than they’ve ever been. We’re confident that with Photon, Firefox Quantum users will be impressed by the modern new design that puts their needs first. Photon doesn’t just look good, it’s also smarter. If you’re using Photon on a Windows PC with a touch display, the menus change size based on whether you click with a mouse or touch with a finger.

The new, minimalist design introduces square tabs, smooth animations, and a Library, which provides quick access to your saved stuff: bookmarks, Pocket, history, downloads, tabs, and screenshots. Firefox Quantum feels right at home with today’s mouse and touch-driven operating systems: Windows 10, macOS High Sierra, Android Oreo, and iOS 11.

 

https://blog.mozilla.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Firefox-Quantum-Photon-UI-2.webm

 

 

Pocket built-in

Firefox Quantum enhances Firefox’s integration with Pocket, the read-it-later app that Mozilla acquired last year. When you open a new tab, you’ll see currently trending web pages recommended by Pocket users so you won’t miss out on what’s hot online, as well as your top sites. With the Pocket app for iOS and Android, you’ll have offline access to your saved stories wherever you go.

 

https://blog.mozilla.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Firefox-Quantum-integrates-Pocket.webm

 

Upgrade to Firefox Quantum soon, or download the Beta today

If you’re already among the Firefox faithful, you’ll automatically upgrade to Firefox Quantum on November 14. But, if you enjoy the cutting edge, you can try it in Beta on desktop, Android, and iOS. Or, if you’re a web developer, download Developer Edition, which includes brand new, cutting-edge tools for those who build the web.

So much has changed about Firefox these past few years, and even more is in store. To learn more about Firefox Quantum in November, visit our page and we’ll keep you up to date on the latest news.

We’re super excited to get Firefox Quantum to our beta users and hope you’ll give it a try.

The post Start Your Engines – Firefox Quantum Lands in Beta, Developer Edition appeared first on The Mozilla Blog.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Start Your Engines – Firefox Quantum Lands in Beta, Developer Edition

Mozilla Blog - ti, 26/09/2017 - 15:14

Engines are important, both in cars and in browsers. That’s why we’re so revved up this morning – we’re releasing the Beta of a whole new Firefox, one that’s powered by a completely reinvented, modernized engine. Since the version number – 57 – can’t really convey the magnitude of the changes we’ve made, and how much faster this new Firefox is, we’re calling this upcoming release Firefox Quantum.

The journey to Firefox Quantum

Last October we announced Project Quantum, our effort to create a next-generation engine for modern computers, by leveraging technology from our Servo research project. Since then, our engineering team has been relentless in their focus on making Firefox incredibly fast.

Already this year we’ve launched several major improvements to Firefox that have it made it better than ever. For example, we’ve transformed Firefox to run using multiple processes, striking the “just right” balance between speed and memory usage. In addition, we’ve launched game-changing features like WebAssembly and WebVR, enabling super fast, near-native performance for web apps on the desktop and on VR headsets.

We’ve shipped a lot already, but we’ve been planning for many more projects to come together in Firefox Quantum.

Noticeably faster on many of the top websites

Firefox Quantum is such a big leap forward that you’ll feel it instantly, just browsing your favorite websites.

Turns out you can measure Firefox Quantum’s speed, too – our pit crew is kind of obsessed with a data-driven approach. One simple way of estimating browser performance is with Speedometer 2.0, a (still-in-development) benchmark that simulates modern web applications. Results vary based on the computer and apps you’re actively using, but one thing that’s relatively consistent is that Firefox Quantum is about 2X faster than Firefox was a year ago.

We encourage you to make your own comparisons, but here’s a short video that captures our observations when comparing Firefox Quantum and Chrome on various websites. Firefox Quantum is often perceivably faster.

Webpagetest running on Acer Aspire E15. Performance varies based on several factors.

 

So how we did we make Firefox Quantum so fast?

Firefox has historically run mostly on just one CPU core, but Firefox Quantum takes advantage of multiple CPU cores in today’s desktop and mobile devices much more effectively. This improved utilization of your computer’s hardware makes Firefox Quantum dramatically faster. One example: we’ve developed a breakthrough approach to laying out pages: a super fast CSS engine written in Rust, a systems programming language that Mozilla pioneered. Firefox’s new CSS engine runs quickly, in parallel across multiple CPU cores, instead of running in one slower sequence on a single core. No other browser can do this.

We’ve also improved Firefox so that the tab you’re actively using downloads and runs before other tabs you have open in the background. This prioritization of your active tab, along with Firefox’s “just right” multi-process architecture, results in Firefox Quantum often being faster than Chrome, while consuming roughly 30% less RAM.

In addition, for the past several months we’ve run a browser-wide initiative to zap any instances of slowness you might encounter while using Firefox. So far our pit crew has fixed 468 of these issues, both small papercuts and big bottlenecks.

 

Introducing the fast and fluid Photon design

It’s not enough to perform well on benchmarks, it’s also important that our users feel like they’re using a well thought out and high performance product.  To reflect all these under-the-hood improvements, we’ve refined and rebuilt Firefox’s user interface through our Photon project. Our talented team of designers and user researchers spent time understanding how users perceive web browsers, and in particular where they felt they were waiting on their browsers.

With the new design, Firefox leaps ahead with a new interface that reflects today’s reality of High DPI displays and users who are more task focused than they’ve ever been. We’re confident that with Photon, Firefox Quantum users will be impressed by the modern new design that puts their needs first. Photon doesn’t just look good, it’s also smarter. If you’re using Photon on a Windows PC with a touch display, the menus change size based on whether you click with a mouse or touch with a finger.

The new, minimalist design introduces square tabs, smooth animations, and a Library, which provides quick access to your saved stuff: bookmarks, Pocket, history, downloads, tabs, and screenshots. Firefox Quantum feels right at home with today’s mouse and touch-driven operating systems: Windows 10, macOS High Sierra, Android Oreo, and iOS 11.

 

https://blog.mozilla.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Firefox-Quantum-Photon-UI-2.webm

 

 

Pocket built-in

Firefox Quantum enhances Firefox’s integration with Pocket, the read-it-later app that Mozilla acquired last year. When you open a new tab, you’ll see currently trending web pages recommended by Pocket users so you won’t miss out on what’s hot online, as well as your top sites. With the Pocket app for iOS and Android, you’ll have offline access to your saved stories wherever you go.

 

https://blog.mozilla.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Firefox-Quantum-integrates-Pocket.webm

 

Upgrade to Firefox Quantum soon, or download the Beta today

If you’re already among the Firefox faithful, you’ll automatically upgrade to Firefox Quantum on November 14. But, if you enjoy the cutting edge, you can try it in Beta on desktop, Android, and iOS. Or, if you’re a web developer, download Developer Edition, which includes brand new, cutting-edge tools for those who build the web.

So much has changed about Firefox these past few years, and even more is in store. To learn more about Firefox Quantum in November, visit our page and we’ll keep you up to date on the latest news.

We’re super excited to get Firefox Quantum to our beta users and hope you’ll give it a try.

The post Start Your Engines – Firefox Quantum Lands in Beta, Developer Edition appeared first on The Mozilla Blog.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Air Mozilla: Embedded Recipes 26 Sept. (Full Day)

Mozilla planet - ti, 26/09/2017 - 10:00

Embedded Recipes 26 Sept. (Full Day) The first embedded conference in Paris

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Air Mozilla: Embedded Recipes 26 Sept. (Full Day)

Mozilla planet - ti, 26/09/2017 - 10:00

Embedded Recipes 26 Sept. (Full Day) The first embedded conference in Paris

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

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