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Mozilla Release Management Team: Firefox 2015 release schedule

Mozilla planet - ti, 13/01/2015 - 13:02

A final 2015 schedule for Firefox (Desktop, Mobile and ESR) has been defined.
Release owners can be found on the Mozilla wiki but might change during the 2015 year.

Firefox Version Release date Firefox 43 2015-12-15 Firefox 42 2015-11-03 Firefox 41 2015-09-22 Firefox 40 2015-08-11 Firefox 39 2015-06-30 Firefox 38 (ESR base) 2015-05-19 Firefox 37 2015-04-07 Firefox 36 2015-02-24 Firefox 35 2015-01-13

As usual, Desktop, Mobile and ESR are going to be released on the same day.<br /

A calendar containing only the date of the release and the merge is available under XML, iCal and HTML.

In parallel, the detailed calendar is published under various forms: XML, iCal and HTML.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Firefox Enables You to Experience and Share More on the Web

Mozilla Blog - ti, 13/01/2015 - 10:03
Firefox puts you in control of your online life and puts everything you need in a personal and customized Web experience. Now, we’re making it easier to experience and share everything you enjoy on the Web with video calling, social … Continue reading
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Daniel Stenberg: My first year at Mozilla

Mozilla planet - ti, 13/01/2015 - 09:49

January 13th 2014 I started my fiMozilla dinosaur head logorst day at Mozilla. One year ago exactly today.

It still feels like it was just a very short while ago and I keep having this sense of being a beginner at the company, in the source tree and all over.

One year of networking code work that really at least during periods has not progressed as quickly as I would’ve wished for, and I’ve had some really hair-tearing problems and challenges that have taken me sweat and tears to get through. But I am getting through and I’m enjoying every (oh well, let’s say almost every) moment.

During the year I’ve had the chance to meetup with my team mates twice (in Paris and in Portland) and I’ve managed to attend one IETF (in London) and two special HTTP2 design meetings (in London and NYC).

openhub.net counts 47 commits by me in Firefox and that feels like counting high. bugzilla has tracked activity by me in 107 bug reports through the year.

I’ve barely started. I’ll spend the next year as well improving Firefox networking, hopefully with a higher turnout this year. (I don’t mean to make this sound as if Firefox networking is just me, I’m just speaking for my particular part of the networking team and effort and I let the others speak for themselves!)

Onwards and upwards!

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Firefox Hello Makes Connecting By Video As Simple As In Person

Mozilla Blog - ti, 13/01/2015 - 09:49
Conversations should begin by video as simply as they do in person. The fact is they don’t. You have to give up your email address, set up an account and share personal information as well as download software before starting … Continue reading
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Daniel Stenberg: My table tennis racket sized phone

Mozilla planet - ti, 13/01/2015 - 08:34

I upgraded my Nexus 5 to a Nexus 6 the other day. It is a biiiig phone, and just to show you how big I made a little picture showing all my Android phones so far using the correct relative sizes. It certainly isn’t very far away from a table tennis racket in size now. My Android track record so far goes like this: HTC Magic, HTC Desire HD, Nexus 4, Nexus 5 and now Nexus 6.

my-androids

As shown, this latest step is probably the biggest relative size change in a single go. If the next step would be as big, imagine the size that would require! (While you think about that, I’ve already done the math: the 6 is 159.3 mm tall, 15.5% taller than the 5’s’ 137.9mm, so adding 15.5% to the Nexus 6 ends up at 184 – only 16 mm shorter than a Nexus 7 in portrait mode… I don’t think I could handle that!)

After the initial size shock, I’m enjoying the large size. It is a bit of a clunker to cram down into my left front-side jeans pocket where I’m used to carry around my device. It is still doable, but not as easy as before and it easily get uncomfortable when sitting down. I guess I need to sit less or change my habit somehow.

This largest phone ever ironically switched to the smallest SIM card size so my micro-SIM had to be replaced with a nano-SIM.

Borked upgrade procedure

Not a single non-Google app got installed in my new device in the process. I strongly suspect it was that “touch the back of another device to copy from” thing that broke it because it didn’t work at all – and when it failed, it did not offer me to restore a copy from backup which I later learned it does if I skip the touch-back step. I ended up manually re-installing my additional 100 or so apps…

My daughter then switched from her Nexus 4 to my (by then) clean-wiped 5.  For her, we skipped that broken back-touch process and she got a nice backup from the 4 restored onto the 5. But she got another nasty surprise: basically over half of her contacts were just gone when she opened the contacts app on the 5, so we had to manually go through the contact list on the old device and re-add them into the new one. The way we did (not even do) it in the 90s…

The Android device installation (and data transfer) process is not perfect yet. Although my brother says he did his two upgrades perfectly smoothly…

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Ian Bicking: Being A Manager Is Lonely

Mozilla planet - ti, 13/01/2015 - 07:00

Management is new for me. I have spent a lot of time focusing on the craft of programming, now I focus on the people who focus on the craft of programming.

During the fifteen years I’ve been participating in something I’ll call a developer community, I’ve seen a lot of progress. Sometimes we wax nostalgic with an assertion that no progress has been made… but progress has been made. We, as professionals, hobbyists, as passionate practitioners understand much more about how to test, design, package, distribute, collaborate around code. And just about how to talk about it all.

I am a firm believer that much of that progress is due to the internet. There were technological advancements, sure. And there have been books teaching practice. But that’s not enough. There were incredible ideas about programming in the 70s! But there wasn’t the infrastructure to help developers assimilate those ideas.

I put more weight on people learning than on people being taught. If the internet was just a good medium for information dispersal — a better kind of book — then that is nice, but not transformational. The internet is more than that: it’s a place to discuss, and disagree, and watch others discussing. You can be provocative, and then step back and take on a more conservative opinion – a transformation most people would be too shy to commit to print. (As if substantial portion of people have ever had the option to consider what they want to commit to print!)

I think a debate is an opportunity; seldom an opportunity to convince anyone else of what you think, but a chance to understand why you think what you do, to come to a more mature understanding, and maybe create a framework for future changes of opinion. This is why I bristle at the phrase “just choose the right tool for the job” – this phrase is an attempt to shut down the discussion about what the right tool for the job is!

This is a long digression, but I am nostalgic for how I grew into my profession. Nostalgic because now I cannot have this. I cannot discuss my job. I cannot debate the details. I cannot tell anecdotes to elucidate a point. I cannot discuss the policies I am asked to implement – the institutional instructions applied to me and through me. I can only attempt to process my experiences in isolation.

And there are good reasons for this! While this makes me sad, and though I still question if there is not another way, there are very good reasons why I cannot talk about my work. I am in a leadership position, even if only a modest and subordinate leader. There is a great deal of potential for collateral damage in what I say, especially if I talk about the things I am thinking most about. I think most about the tensions in my company, interpreting the motivations of the leadership in the company, I think about the fears I sense in my reports, the unspoken tensions about what is done, expected, aspired to. I can discuss this with the individuals involved, but they are the furthest thing from a disinterested party, and often not in a place to develop collaborative wisdom.

This is perhaps unfair. I work with very thoughtful people. Our work is grounded in a shared mission, which is a powerful thing. But it’s not enough.

Are we, as a community of managers (is there such a thing?) becoming better? Yes, some. There are management consultants and books and other material about management, and there is value in that. But it is not a discussion, it is not easy to assimilate. I don’t get to interact with a community of peers.

On the topic of learning to manage, I have listened to many episodes of Manager Tools now. I’ve learned a lot, and it’s helped me, even if they are more authoritarian than makes me comfortable. I’m writing this now after listening to a two part series: Welcome To They: Professional Subordination and Part 2.

The message in these podcasts is: it is your responsibility as a manager to support the company’s decisions. Not just to execute on them, but to support them, to communicate that support, and if you disagree then you must hide that disagreement in the service of the company. You can disagree up — though even that is fraught with danger — but you can’t disagree down. You must hold yourself apart from your team, putting a wall between you and your team. To your team you are the company, not a peer.

There is a logical consistency to the argument. There is wisdom in it. The impact of complaints filtering up is much different than the impact of complaints filtering down. In some sense as a manager you must manufacture your own consensus for decisions that you cannot affect. You are probably doing your reports a favor by positively communicating decisions, as they will be doing themselves a favor by positively engaging with those decisions. But their advice is clear: if you are asked your opinion, you must agree with the decision, maybe stoically, but you must agree, not just concede. You must speak for the company, not for yourself.

Fuck. Why would I want to sign up for this? The dictate they are giving me is literally making me sad. If it didn’t make any sense then I might feel annoyed. If I thought it represented values I did not share then I might feel angry. But I get it, and so it makes me sad.

Still, I believe in progress. I believe we can do better than we have in the past. I believe in unexplored paths, in options we aren’t ready to compare to present convention, in new ways of thinking about problems that break out of current categories. All this in management too – which is to say, new ways to form and coordinate organizations. I think those ideas are out there. But damn, I don’t know what they are, and I don’t know how to find out, because I don’t know how to talk about what we do and that’s the only place where I know how to start.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Joshua Cranmer: Why email is hard, part 8: why email security failed

Mozilla planet - ti, 13/01/2015 - 05:38
This post is part 8 of an intermittent series exploring the difficulties of writing an email client. Part 1 describes a brief history of the infrastructure. Part 2 discusses internationalization. Part 3 discusses MIME. Part 4 discusses email addresses. Part 5 discusses the more general problem of email headers. Part 6 discusses how email security works in practice. Part 7 discusses the problem of trust. This part discusses why email security has largely failed.

At the end of the last part in this series, I posed the question, "Which email security protocol is most popular?" The answer to the question is actually neither S/MIME nor PGP, but a third protocol, DKIM. I haven't brought up DKIM until now because DKIM doesn't try to secure email in the same vein as S/MIME or PGP, but I still consider it relevant to discussing email security.

Unquestionably, DKIM is the only security protocol for email that can be considered successful. There are perhaps 4 billion active email addresses [1]. Of these, about 1-2 billion use DKIM. In contrast, S/MIME can count a few million users, and PGP at best a few hundred thousand. No other security protocols have really caught on past these three. Why did DKIM succeed where the others fail?

DKIM's success stems from its relatively narrow focus. It is nothing more than a cryptographic signature of the message body and a smattering of headers, and is itself stuck in the DKIM-Signature header. It is meant to be applied to messages only on outgoing servers and read and processed at the recipient mail server—it completely bypasses clients. That it bypasses clients allows it to solve the problem of key discovery and key management very easily (public keys are stored in DNS, which is already a key part of mail delivery), and its role in spam filtering is strong motivation to get it implemented quickly (it is 7 years old as of this writing). It's also simple: this one paragraph description is basically all you need to know [2].

The failure of S/MIME and PGP to see large deployment is certainly a large topic of discussion on myriads of cryptography enthusiast mailing lists, which often like to partake in propositions of new end-to-end encryption of email paradigms, such as the recent DIME proposal. Quite frankly, all of these solutions suffer broadly from at least the same 5 fundamental weaknesses, and I see it unlikely that a protocol will come about that can fix these weaknesses well enough to become successful.

The first weakness, and one I've harped about many times already, is UI. Most email security UI is abysmal and generally at best usable only by enthusiasts. At least some of this is endemic to security: while it mean seem obvious how to convey what an email signature or an encrypted email signifies, how do you convey the distinctions between sign-and-encrypt, encrypt-and-sign, or an S/MIME triple wrap? The Web of Trust model used by PGP (and many other proposals) is even worse, in that inherently requires users to do other actions out-of-band of email to work properly.

Trust is the second weakness. Consider that, for all intents and purposes, the email address is the unique identifier on the Internet. By extension, that implies that a lot of services are ultimately predicated on the notion that the ability to receive and respond to an email is a sufficient means to identify an individual. However, the entire purpose of secure email, or at least of end-to-end encryption, is subtly based on the fact that other people in fact have access to your mailbox, thus destroying the most natural ways to build trust models on the Internet. The quest for anonymity or privacy also renders untenable many other plausible ways to establish trust (e.g., phone verification or government-issued ID cards).

Key discovery is another weakness, although it's arguably the easiest one to solve. If you try to keep discovery independent of trust, the problem of key discovery is merely picking a protocol to publish and another one to find keys. Some of these already exist: PGP key servers, for example, or using DANE to publish S/MIME or PGP keys.

Key management, on the other hand, is a more troubling weakness. S/MIME, for example, basically works without issue if you have a certificate, but managing to get an S/MIME certificate is a daunting task (necessitated, in part, by its trust model—see how these issues all intertwine?). This is also where it's easy to say that webmail is an unsolvable problem, but on further reflection, I'm not sure I agree with that statement anymore. One solution is just storing the private key with the webmail provider (you're trusting them as an email client, after all), but it's also not impossible to imagine using phones or flash drives as keystores. Other key management factors are more difficult to solve: people who lose their private keys or key rollover create thorny issues. There is also the difficulty of managing user expectations: if I forget my password to most sites (even my email provider), I can usually get it reset somehow, but when a private key is lost, the user is totally and completely out of luck.

Of course, there is one glaring and almost completely insurmountable problem. Encrypted email fundamentally precludes certain features that we have come to take for granted. The lesser known is server-side search and filtration. While there exist some mechanisms to do search on encrypted text, those mechanisms rely on the fact that you can manipulate the text to change the message, destroying the integrity feature of secure email. They also tend to be fairly expensive. It's easy to just say "who needs server-side stuff?", but the contingent of people who do email on smartphones would not be happy to have to pay the transfer rates to download all the messages in their folder just to find one little email, nor the energy costs of doing it on the phone. And those who have really large folders—Fastmail has a design point of 1,000,000 in a single folder—would still prefer to not have to transfer all their mail even on desktops.

The more well-known feature that would disappear is spam filtration. Consider that 90% of all email is spam, and if you think your spam folder is too slim for that to be true, it's because your spam folder only contains messages that your email provider wasn't sure were spam. The loss of server-side spam filtering would dramatically increase the cost of spam (a 10% reduction in efficiency would double the amount of server storage, per my calculations), and client-side spam filtering is quite literally too slow [3] and too costly (remember smartphones? Imagine having your email take 10 times as much energy and bandwidth) to be a tenable option. And privacy or anonymity tends to be an invitation to abuse (cf. Tor and Wikipedia). Proposed solutions to the spam problem are so common that there is a checklist containing most of the objections.

When you consider all of those weaknesses, it is easy to be pessimistic about the possibility of wide deployment of powerful email security solutions. The strongest future—all email is encrypted, including metadata—is probably impossible or at least woefully impractical. That said, if you weaken some of the assumptions (say, don't desire all or most traffic to be encrypted), then solutions seem possible if difficult.

This concludes my discussion of email security, at least until things change for the better. I don't have a topic for the next part in this series picked out (this part actually concludes the set I knew I wanted to discuss when I started), although OAuth and DMARC are two topics that have been bugging me enough recently to consider writing about. They also have the unfortunate side effect of being things likely to see changes in the near future, unlike most of the topics I've discussed so far. But rest assured that I will find more difficulties in the email infrastructure to write about before long!

[1] All of these numbers are crude estimates and are accurate to only an order of magnitude. To justify my choices: I assume 1 email address per Internet user (this overestimates the developing world and underestimates the developed world). The largest webmail providers have given numbers that claim to be 1 billion active accounts between them, and all of them use DKIM. S/MIME is guessed by assuming that any smartcard deployment supports S/MIME, and noting that the US Department of Defense and Estonia's digital ID project are both heavy users of such smartcards. PGP is estimated from the size of the strong set and old numbers on the reachable set from the core Web of Trust.
[2] Ever since last April, it's become impossible to mention DKIM without referring to DMARC, as a result of Yahoo's controversial DMARC policy. A proper discussion of DMARC (and why what Yahoo did was controversial) requires explaining the mail transmission architecture and spam, however, so I'll defer that to a later post. It's also possible that changes in this space could happen within the next year.
[3] According to a former GMail spam employee, if it takes you as long as three minutes to calculate reputation, the spammer wins.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Hannah Kane: I need to reprint my business cards

Mozilla planet - ti, 13/01/2015 - 02:37

Okay, so I don’t actually have business cards, but on this morning’s All Mofo call, it was announced that I’m leaving the wonderful Engagement team to serve as a product manager for the equally wonderful Learning Networks team. So, if I had business cards, I’d need new ones.

This is, for obvious reasons, bittersweet. I’ve LOVED working with the engaging folks on the Engagement team, and it provided a fantastic vantage point for learning the ins and outs of Mofo. I’m sending a big heartfelt thank you to Geoffrey and Co. for being so dang awsm to me ever since I joined.

Fortunately for me, I’m not going far. I’ve been admiring the work of both the Mentor Networks and the Product teams from a distance, so I’m thrilled with my new spot right smack in the middle of them.

Wait….Hannah, what do you know about product management? And Learning Networks?

It might seem strange at first blush, since I’ve been talking about scrum mastering and engagement-y stuff on this blog so far. But, lest you think I’m totally unqualified, let me share a few relevant experiences I haven’t shared here before:

  • I was a Product Owner at my last job. “Product Owner” is a title specific to Scrum shops, but it’s got a whole lot in common with Product Manager. Working with devs? Check! UI and UX designers? Yup, them too. End users and stakeholders? Love ‘em. Caring about product adoption rates, product marketing, and customer service? For sure, uh huh, no doubt.
  • I have experience shepherding a product to serve a local groups-based organizing model, much like the vision for Webmaker Clubs. I hope to bring useful knowledge from that project, drawing on both successes and failures (because, hey, “what not to do” lists are useful, too!)
  • While I won’t be contributing in this way, I do have a bit of experience as a trainer—I’ve developed and delivered service-learning and social justice careers curricula to kids, college students, and adults. I’m nowhere near as savvy as our #TeachTheWeb team, but I can promise to keep the needs of the mentors at the forefront of my brain.

OK, so what are you going to be working on?

The Big Picture answer is: developing products that serve the needs of our constituents in our ground game programs (Hive, Webmaker Clubs, Maker Parties). These products will be separate from, but complementary of, the Learning Products, which serve independent learners who aren’t (yet!) affiliated with our ground game programs.

In the short term, my top priorities are:

  • Building a new home for all of our teaching resources and a launching point for all of our ground game programs (teach.webmaker.org). v1 will be a re-org of our existing content, so we’ve launched a small user research study (you may have seen Lucy’s recent email to the Webmaker listserv asking for volunteers). The participants are doing a virtual version of what’s called a “card sorting” activity to help us understand their mental models around all of the content we currently have. The results will inform the information architecture for Teach.w.o v1.
  • Launching a platform for local groups (i.e. Clubs and potentially Hives). Q1 is about two flavors of research: 1) Developing a deep, nuanced understanding of our own business needs and the needs of our users—in this case, the Club Leaders in the Q1 Pilot. 2) Investigating off-the-shelf options for the platform.
  • Iterating on our credentials platform. Again, this starts with developing a deep, shared understanding of business needs. Stakeholder kick-off meeting coming soon!

I’m so very excited to be working on these things. Like, I’m seriously being a nerd about it all.

At the same time, I’m already missing my Engagement team buddies (though that’s tempered by the fact that I still get to work with nearly all of them :)).

Questions? Want to discuss the Learning Networks products? Hit me up.


Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

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