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Will Kahn-Greene: html5lib-python 1.0 released!

Mozilla planet - fr, 08/12/2017 - 18:00
html5lib-python v1.0 released!

Yesterday, Geoffrey released html5lib 1.0 [1]! The changes aren't wildly interesting.

The more interesting part for me is how the release happened. I'm going to spend the rest of this post talking about that.

[1]Technically there was a 1.0 release followed by a 1.0.1 release because the 1.0 release had issues. The story of Bleach and html5lib

I work on Bleach which is a Python library for sanitizing and linkifying text from untrusted sources for safe usage in HTML. It relies heavily on another library called html5lib-python. Most of the work that I do on Bleach consists of figuring out how to make html5lib do what I need it to do.

Over the last few years, maintainers of the html5lib library have been working towards a 1.0. Those well-meaning efforts got them into a versioning model which had some unenthusing properties. I would often talk to people about how I was having difficulties with Bleach and html5lib 0.99999999 (8 9s) and I'd have to mentally count how many 9s I had said. It was goofy [2].

In an attempt to deal with the effects of the versioning, there's a parallel set of versions that start with 1.0b. Because there are two sets of versions, it was a total pain in the ass to correctly specify which versions of html5lib that Bleach worked with.

While working on Bleach 2.0, I bumped into a few bugs and upstreamed a patch for at least one of them. That patch sat in the PR queue for months. That's what got me wondering--is this project dead?

I tracked down Geoffrey and talked with him a bit on IRC. He seems to be the only active maintainer. He was really busy with other things, html5lib doesn't pay at all, there's a ton of stuff to do, he's burned out, and recently there have been spats of negative comments in the issues and PRs. Generally the project had a lot of stop energy.

Some time in August, I offered to step up as an interim maintainer and shepherd html5lib to 1.0. The goals being:

  1. land or close as many old PRs as possible
  2. triage, fix, and close as many issues as possible
  3. clean up testing and CI
  4. clean up documentation
  5. ship 1.0 which ends the versioning issues
[2]Many things in life are goofy. Thoughts on being an interim maintainer

I see a lot of open source projects that are in trouble in the sense that they don't have a critical mass of people and energy. When the sole part-time volunteer maintainer burns out, the project languishes. Then the entitled users show up, complain, demand changes, and talk about how horrible the situation is and everyone should be ashamed. It's tough--people are frustrated and then do a bunch of things that make everything so much worse. How do projects escape the raging inferno death spiral?

For a while now, I've been thinking about a model for open source projects where someone else pops in as an interim maintainer for a short period of time with specific goals and then steps down. Maybe this alleviates users' frustrations? Maybe this gives the part-time volunteer burned-out maintainer a breather? Maybe this can get the project moving again? Maybe the temporary interim maintainer can make some of the hard decisions that a regular long-term maintainer just can't?

I wondered if I should try that model out here. In the process of convincing myself that stepping up as an interim maintainer was a good idea [3], I looked at projects that rely on html5lib [4]:

  • pip vendors it
  • Bleach relies upon it heavily, so anything that uses Bleach uses html5lib (jupyter, hypermark, readme_renderer, tensorflow, ...)
  • most web browsers (Firefox, Chrome, servo, etc) have it in their repositories because web-platform-tests uses it

I talked with Geoffrey and offered to step up with these goals in mind.

I started with cleaning up the milestones in GitHub. I bumped everything from the 0.9999999999 (10 9s) milestone which I determined will never happen into a 1.0 milestone. I used this as a bucket for collecting all the issues and PRs that piqued my interest.

I went through the issue tracker and triaged all the issues. I tried to get steps to reproduce and any other data that would help resolve the issue. I closed some issues I didn't think would ever get resolved.

I triaged all the pull requests. Some of them had been open for a long time. I apologized to people who had spent their time to upstream a fix that sat around for years. In some cases, the changes had bitrotted severely and had to be redone [5].

Then I plugged away at issues and pull requests for a couple of months and pushed anything out of the milestone that wasn't well-defined or something we couldn't fix in a week.

At the end of all that, Geoffrey released version 1.0 and here we are today!

[3]I have precious little free time, so this decision had sweeping consequences for my life, my work, and people around me. [4]Recently, I discovered libraries.io--it's pretty amazing project. They have a page for html5lib. I had written a (mediocre) tool that does vaguely similar things. [5]This is what happens on projects that don't have a critical mass of energy/people. It sucks for everyone involved. Conclusion and thoughts

I finished up as interim maintainer for html5lib. I don't think I'm going to continue actively as a maintainer. Yes, Bleach uses it, but I've got other things I should be doing.

I think this was an interesting experiment. I also think it was a successful experiment in regards to achieving my stated goals, but I don't know if it gave the project much momentum to continue forward.

I'd love to see other examples of interim maintainers stepping up, achieving specific goals, and then stepping down again. Does it bring in new people to the community? Does it affect the raging inferno death spiral at all? What kinds of projects would benefit from this the most? What kinds of projects wouldn't benefit at all?

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

The Mozilla Blog: Mozilla Awards Research Grants to Fund Top Research Projects

Mozilla planet - fr, 08/12/2017 - 17:53

We are happy to announce the results of the Mozilla Research Grant program for the second half of 2017. This was a competitive process, with over 70 applicants. After three rounds of judging, we selected a total of fourteen proposals, ranging from building tools to support open web platform projects like Rust and WebAssembly to designing digital assistants for low- and middle- income families and exploring decentralized web projects in the Orkney Islands. All these projects support Mozilla’s mission to make the Internet safer, more empowering, and more accessible.

The Mozilla Research Grants program is part of Mozilla’s Emerging Technologies commitment to being a world-class example of inclusive innovation and impact culture-and reflects Mozilla’s commitment to open innovation, continuously exploring new possibilities with and for diverse communities.

Zhendong Su University of California, Davis Practical, Rigorous Testing of the Mozilla Rust and bindgen Compilers Ross Tate Cornell University Inferable Typed WebAssembly Laura Watts IT University of Copenhagen Shaping community-based managed services (‘Orkney Cloud Saga’) Svetlana Yarosh University of Minnesota Children & Parent Using Speech Interfaces for Informational Queries Serge Egelman UC Berkeley / International Computer Science Institute Towards Usable IoT Access Controls in the Home Alexis Hiniker University of Washington Understanding Design Opportunities for In-Home Digital Assistants for Low- and Middle-Income Families Blase Ur University of Chicago Improving Communication About Privacy in Web Browsers Wendy Ju Cornell Tech Video Data Corpus of People Reacting to Chatbot Answers to Enable Error Recognition and Repair Katherine Isbister University of California Santa Cruz Designing for VR Publics: Creating the right interaction infrastructure for pro-social connection, privacy, inclusivity, and co-mingling in social VR Sanjeev Arora Princeton University and the Institute for Advanced Study Compact representations of meaning of natural language: Toward a rigorous and interpretable study Rachel Cummings Georgia Tech Differentially Private Analysis of Growing Datasets Tongping Liu University of Texas at San Antonio Guarder: Defending Heap Vulnerabilities with Flexible Guarantee and Better Performance

 

The Mozilla Foundation will also be providing grants in support of two additional proposals:

 

J. Nathan Matias CivilServant, incubated by Global Voices Preventing online harassment with Community A/B Test Systems Donghee Yvette Wohn New Jersey Institute of Technology Dealing with Harassment: Moderation Practices of Female and LGBT Live Streamers

 

Congratulations to all successfully funded applicants! The 2018H1 round of grant proposals will open in the Spring; more information is available at https://research.mozilla.org/research-grants/.

Jofish Kaye, Principal Research Scientist, Emerging Technologies, Mozilla

The post Mozilla Awards Research Grants to Fund Top Research Projects appeared first on The Mozilla Blog.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Gregory Szorc: Good Riddance to AUFS

Mozilla planet - fr, 08/12/2017 - 16:00

For over a year, AUFS - a layering filesystem for Linux - has been giving me fits.

As I initially measured last year, AUFS has... suboptimal performance characteristics. The crux of the problem is that AUFS obtains a global lock in the Linux kernel (at least version 3.13) for various I/O operations, including stat(). If you have more than a couple of active CPU cores, the overhead from excessive kernel locking inside _raw_spin_lock() can add more overhead than extra CPU cores add capacity. That's right: under certain workloads, adding more CPU cores actually slows down execution due to cores being starved waiting for a global lock in the kernel!

If that weren't enough, AUFS can also violate POSIX filesystem guarantees under load. It appears that AUFS sometimes forgets about created files or has race conditions that prevent created files from being visible to readers until many seconds later! I think this issue only occurs when there are concurrent threads creating files.

These two characteristics of AUFS have inflicted a lot of hardship on Firefox's continuous integration. Large parts of Firefox's CI execute in Docker. And the host environment for Docker has historically used Ubuntu 14.04 with Linux 3.13 and Docker using AUFS. AUFS was/is the default storage driver for many versions of Docker. When this storage driver is used, all files inside Docker containers are backed by AUFS unless a Docker volume (a directory bind mounted from the host filesystem - EXT4 in our case) is in play.

When we started using EC2 instances with more CPU cores, we weren't getting a linear speedup for CPU bound operations. Instead, CPU cycles were being spent inside the kernel. Stack profiling showed AUFS as the culprit. We were thus unable to leverage more powerful EC2 instances because adding more cores would only provide marginal to negative gains against significant cost expenditure.

We worked around this problem by making heavy use of Docker volumes for tasks incurring significant I/O. This included version control clones and checkouts.

Somewhere along the line, we discovered that AUFS volumes were also the cause of several random file not found errors throughout automation. Initially, we thought many of these errors were due to bugs in the underlying tools (Mercurial and Firefox's build system were common victims because they do lots of concurrent I/O). When the bugs mysteriously went away after ensuring certain operations were performed on EXT4 volumes, we were able to blame AUFS for the myriad of filesystem consistency problems.

Earlier today, we pushed out a change to upgrade Firefox's CI to Linux 4.4 and switched Docker from AUFS to overlayfs (using the overlay2 storage driver). The improvements exceeded my expectations.

Linux build times have decreased by ~4 minutes, from ~750s to ~510s.

Linux Rust test times have decreased by ~4 minutes, from ~615s to ~380s.

Linux PGO build times have decreased by ~5 minutes, from ~2130s to ~1820s.

And this is just the build side of the world. I don't have numbers off hand, but I suspect many tests also got a nice speedup from this change.

Multiplied by thousands of tasks per day and factoring in the cost to operate these machines, the elimination of AUFS has substantially increased the efficiency (and reliability) of Firefox CI and easily saved Mozilla tens of thousands of dollars per year. And that's just factoring in the savings in the AWS bill. Time is money and people are a lot more expensive than AWS instances (you can run over 3,000 c5.large EC2 instances at spot pricing for what it costs to employ me when I'm on the clock). So the real win here comes from Firefox developers being able to move faster because their builds and tests complete several minutes faster.

In conclusion, if you care about performance or filesystem correctness, avoid AUFS. Use overlayfs instead.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Dustin J. Mitchell: Parameterized Roles

Mozilla planet - fr, 08/12/2017 - 16:00

The roles functionality in Taskcluster is a kind of “macro expansion”: given the roles

group:admins -> admin-scope-1 admin-scope-2 assume:group:devs group:devs -> dev-scope

the scopeset ["assume:group:admins", "my-scope"] expands to

[ "admin-scope-1", "admin-scope-2", "assume:group:admins", "assume:group:devs", "dev-scope", "my-scope", ]

because the assume:group:admins expanded the group:admins role, and that recursively expanded the group:devs role.

However, this macro expansion did not allow any parameters, similar to allowing function calls but without any arguments.

The result is that we have a lot of roles that look the same. For example, project-admin:.. roles all have similar scopes (with the project name included in them), and a big warning in the description saying “DO NOT EDIT”.

Role Parameters

Now we can do better! A role’s scopes can now include <..>. When expanding, this string is replaced by the portion of the scope that matched the * in the roleId. An example makes this clear:

project-admin:* -> assume:hook-id:project-<..>/* assume:project:<..>:* auth:create-client:project/<..>/* auth:create-role:hook-id:project-<..>/* auth:create-role:project:<..>:* auth:delete-client:project/<..>/* auth:delete-role:hook-id:project-<..>/* auth:delete-role:project:<..>:* auth:disable-client:project/<..>/* auth:enable-client:project/<..>/* auth:reset-access-token:project/<..>/* auth:update-client:project/<..>/* auth:update-role:hook-id:project-<..>/* auth:update-role:project:<..>:* hooks:modify-hook:project-<..>/* hooks:trigger-hook:project-<..>/* index:insert-task:project.<..>.* project:<..>:* queue:get-artifact:project/<..>/* queue:route:index.project.<..>.* secrets:get:project/<..>/* secrets:set:project/<..>/*

With the above parameterized role in place, we can delete all of the existing project-admin:.. roles: this one will do the job. A client that has assume:project-admin:bugzilla in its scopes will have assume:hook-id:project:bugzilla/* and all the rest in its expandedScopes.

There’s one caveat: a client with assume:project-admin:nss* will have assume:hook-id:project:nss* – note the loss of the trailing /. The * consumes any parts of the scope after the <..>. In practice, as in this case, this is not an issue, but could certainly cause surprise for the unwary.

Implementation

Parameterized roles seem pretty simple, but they’re not!

Efficiency

Before parameterized roles the Taskcluster-Auth service would pre-compute the full expansion of every role. That meant that any API call requiring expansion of a set of scopes only needed to combine the expansion of each scope in the set – a linear operation. This avoided a (potentially exponential-time!) recursive expansion, trading some up-front time pre-computing for a faster response to API calls.

With parameterized roles, such pre-computation is not possible. Depending on the parameter value, the expansion of a role may or may not match other roles. Continuing the example above, the role assume:project:focus:xyz would be expanded when the parameter is focus, but not when the parameter is bugzilla.

The fix was to implement the recursive approach, but in such a way that non-pathological cases have reasonable performance. We use a trie which, given a scope, returns the set of scopes from any matching roles along with the position at which those scopes matched a * in the roleId. In principle, then, we resolve a scopeset by using this trie to expand (by one level) each of the scopes in the scopeset, substituting parameters as necessary, and recursively expand the resulting scopes.

To resolve a scope set, we use a queue to “flatten” the recursion, and keep track of the accumulated scopes as we proceed. We already had some utility functions that allow us to make a few key optimizations. First, it’s only necessary to expand scopes that start with assume: (or, for completeness, things like * or assu*). More importantly, if a scope is already included in the seen scopeset, then we need not enqueue it for recursion – it has already been accounted for.

In the end, the new implementation is tens of milliseconds slower for some of the more common queries. While not ideal, in practice that as not been problematic. If necessary, some simple caching might be added, as many expansions repeat exactly.

Loops

An advantage of the pre-computation was that it could seek a “fixed point” where further expansion does not change the set of expanded scopes. This allowed roles to refer to one another:

some-role -> assume:another-role another* -> assume:some-role

A naïve recursive resolver might loop forever on such an input, but could easily track already-seen scopes and avoid recursing on them again. The situation is much worse with parameterized roles. Consider:

some-role-* -> assume:another-role-<..>x another-role-* -> assume:some-role-<..>y

A simple recursive expansion of assume:some-role-abc would result in an infinite set of roles:

assume:another-role-abcx assume:some-role-abcxy assume:another-role-abcxyx assume:some-role-abcxyxy ...

We forbid such constructions using a cycle check, configured to reject only cycles that involve parameters. That permits the former example while prohibiting the latter.

Atomic Modifications

But even that is not enough! The existing implementation of roles stored each role in a row in Azure Table Storage. Azure provides concurrent access to and modification of rows in this storage, so it’s conceivable that two roles which together form a cycle could be added simultaneously. Cycle checks for each row insertion would each see only one of the rows, but the result after both insertions would cause a cycle. Cycles will crash the Taskcluster-Auth service, which will bring down the rest of Taskcluster. Then a lot of people will have a bad day.

To fix this, we moved roles to Azure Blob Storage, putting all roles in a single blob. This service uses ETags to implement atomic modifications, so we can perform a cycle check before committing and be sure that no cyclical configuration is stored.

What’s Next

The parameterized role support is running in production now, but we have no yet updated any roles, aside from a few test roles, to use it. The next steps are to use the support to address a few known weak points in role configuration, including the project administration roles used as an example above.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Alessio Placitelli: Add-on recommendations for Firefox users: a prototype recommender system leveraging existing data sources

Mozilla planet - fr, 08/12/2017 - 12:59
By: Alessio Placitelli, Ben Miroglio, Jason Thomas, Shell Escalante and Martin Lopatka. With special recognition of the development efforts of Roberto Vitillo who kickstarted this project, Mauro Doglio for massive contributions to the code base during his time at Mozilla, Florian Hartmann, who contributed efforts towards prototyping the ensemble linear combiner, Stuart Colville for coordinating … →
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Ryan Harter: CLI for alerts via Slack

Mozilla planet - fr, 08/12/2017 - 09:00

I finally got a chance to scratch an itch today.

Problem

When working with bigger ETL jobs, I frequently run into jobs that take hours to run. I usually either step away from the computer or work on something less important while the job runs. I don't have a good …

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla Open Innovation Team: From Visual Assets to WebVR Experiences: Mozilla Launches Second Part of its WebVR Medieval Fantasy…

Mozilla planet - to, 07/12/2017 - 18:00
From Visual Assets to WebVR Experiences: Mozilla Launches Second Part of its WebVR Medieval Fantasy Challenge!

Mozilla seeks to continually grow a robust community around A-Frame and WebVR. This is why we partnered with Sketchfab to create hundreds of medieval fantasy assets for the WebVR community to use. Today we are moving forward to use these assets in new and innovative ways such as games, scenes and character interaction.

Launching part two of our WebVR Medieval Fantasy Design Challenge we are calling for developers to create stories and scenes building on the visually stunning collection of assets previously built by talented designers from all around the world.

This challenge started December 5th and will be running until February 28th. We are excited to be able to offer great prizes such as a VR enabled laptop, an Oculus headset, pixel phones, Daydream headsets and even a few Lenovo Jedi Challenge kits.

Through this challenge, we hope to get submissions not only from people who have been using WebVR for a long time but also those who are new to the community and would like to take the plunge into the world of WebVR!

<figcaption>Thor and the Midgard Serpent by MrEmjeR on Sketchfab</figcaption>

Therefore, we have written an extensive tutorial to get new users started in A-Frame and will be using a slack group specifically for this challenge to support new users with quick tips and answers to questions. You can also review the A-Frame blog for more information on building and for project inspiration.

<figcaption>Baba Yaga’s hut by Inuciian on Sketchfab</figcaption>

Check out the Challenge Site for further information and how to submit your work. We can’t wait to see what you come up with!

From Visual Assets to WebVR Experiences: Mozilla Launches Second Part of its WebVR Medieval Fantasy… was originally published in Mozilla Open Innovation on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

The Firefox Frontier: New Firefox Preference Center, Feels As Fast As It Runs

Mozilla planet - to, 07/12/2017 - 15:44

We’ve released an all-new Firefox to the world, and it includes a lot of new browser technology that’s super fast. People and press everywhere are loving it. We’ve made many … Read more

The post New Firefox Preference Center, Feels As Fast As It Runs appeared first on The Firefox Frontier.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

The Mozilla Blog: Mozilla is Funding Art About Online Privacy and Security

Mozilla planet - to, 07/12/2017 - 15:15
Mozilla’s Creative Media Grants support art and artists raising awareness about surveillance, tracking, and hacking

 

La convocatoria para solicitudes está disponible en Español aquí

The Mozilla Manifesto states that “Individuals’ security and privacy on the Internet are fundamental and must not be treated as optional.”

Today, Mozilla is seeking artists, media producers, and storytellers who share that belief — and who use their art to make a difference.

Mozilla’s Creative Media Grants program is now accepting submissions. The program awards grants ranging from $10,000 to $35,000 for films, apps, storytelling, and other forms of media that explore topics like mass surveillance and the erosion of online privacy.

What we’re looking for

We seek to support producers creating work on the web, about the web, and for a broad public. Producers should share Mozilla’s concern that the private communications of internet citizens are increasingly being monitored and monetized by state and corporate actors.

As we move to an era of ubiquitous and connected digital technology, Mozilla sees a vital role for media produced in the public interest that advocates for internet citizens being informed, empowered and in control of their digital lives.

Imagine: An open-source browser extension that reveals how much Facebook really knows about you. Or artwork and journalism that examine how women’s personal data is tracked and commodified online.

(These are real projects, created by artists who now receive Mozilla Creative Media grants. Learn more about Data Selfie and Chupadados.)

The audiences for this work should be primarily in Europe and Latin America.

While this does not preclude makers from other regions from applying, content and approach must be relevant to one of these two regions.

How to apply

To apply, download the application guide.

Lee la descripción del proyecto en Español aquí.

All applications must be in English, and applicants are encouraged to read the application guide. Applications will be open until Midnight Pacific time December 31st, 2017. Applications will be reviewed January 2018.

The post Mozilla is Funding Art About Online Privacy and Security appeared first on The Mozilla Blog.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

William Lachance: Perfherder summer of contribution thoughts

Mozilla planet - ti, 29/09/2015 - 06:00

A few months ago, Joel Maher announced the Perfherder summer of contribution. We wrapped things up there a few weeks ago, so I guess it’s about time I wrote up a bit about how things went.

As a reminder, the idea of summer of contribution was to give a set of contributors the opportunity to make a substantial contribution to a project we were working on (in this case, the Perfherder performance sheriffing system). We would ask that they sign up to do 5–10 hours of work a week for at least 8 weeks. In return, Joel and myself would make ourselves available as mentors to answer questions about the project whenever they ran into trouble.

To get things rolling, I split off a bunch of work that we felt would be reasonable to do by a contributor into bugs of varying difficulty levels (assigning them the bugzilla whiteboard tag ateam-summer-of-contribution). When someone first expressed interest in working on the project, I’d assign them a relatively easy front end one, just to cover the basics of working with the project (checking out code, making a change, submitting a PR to github). If they made it through that, I’d go on to assign them slightly harder or more complex tasks which dealt with other parts of the codebase, the nature of which depended on what they wanted to learn more about. Perfherder essentially has two components: a data storage and analysis backend written in Python and Django, and a web-based frontend written in JS and Angular. There was (still is) lots to do on both, which gave contributors lots of choice.

This system worked pretty well for attracting people. I think we got at least 5 people interested and contributing useful patches within the first couple of weeks. In general I think onboarding went well. Having good documentation for Perfherder / Treeherder on the wiki certainly helped. We had lots of the usual problems getting people familiar with git and submitting proper pull requests: we use a somewhat clumsy combination of bugzilla and github to manage treeherder issues (we “attach” PRs to bugs as plaintext), which can be a bit offputting to newcomers. But once they got past these issues, things went relatively smoothly.

A few weeks in, I set up a fortnightly skype call for people to join and update status and ask questions. This proved to be quite useful: it let me and Joel articulate the higher-level vision for the project to people (which can be difficult to summarize in text) but more importantly it was also a great opportunity for people to ask questions and raise concerns about the project in a free-form, high-bandwidth environment. In general I’m not a big fan of meetings (especially status report meetings) but I think these were pretty useful. Being able to hear someone else’s voice definitely goes a long way to establishing trust that you just can’t get in the same way over email and irc.

I think our biggest challenge was retention. Due to (understandable) time commitments and constraints only one person (Mike Ling) was really able to stick with it until the end. Still, I’m pretty happy with that success rate: if you stop and think about it, even a 10-hour a week time investment is a fair bit to ask. Some of the people who didn’t quite make it were quite awesome, I hope they come back some day.

On that note, a special thanks to Mike Ling for sticking with us this long (he’s still around and doing useful things long after the program ended). He’s done some really fantastic work inside Perfherder and the project is much better for it. I think my two favorite features that he wrote up are the improved test chooser which I talked about a few months ago and a get related platform / branch feature which is a big time saver when trying to determine when a performance regression was first introduced.

I took the time to do a short email interview with him last week. Here’s what he had to say:

  1. Tell us a little bit about yourself. Where do you live? What is it you do when not contributing to Perfherder?

I’m a postgraduate student of NanChang HangKong university in China whose major is Internet of things. Actually,there are a lot of things I would like to do when I am AFK, play basketball, video game, reading books and listening music, just name it ; )

  1. How did you find out about the ateam summer of contribution program?

well, I remember when I still a new comer of treeherder, I totally don’t know how to start my contribution. So, I just go to treeherder irc and ask for advice. As I recall, emorley and jfrench talk with me and give me a lot of hits. Then Will (wlach) send me an Email about ateam summer of contribution and perfherder. He told me it’s a good opportunity to learn more about treeherder and how to work like a team! I almost jump out of bed (I receive that email just before get asleep) and reply with YES. Thank you Will!

  1. What did you find most challenging in the summer of contribution?

I think the most challenging thing is I not only need to know how to code but also need to know how treeherder actually work. It’s a awesome project and there are a ton of things I haven’t heard before (i.e T-test, regression). So I still have a long way to go before I familiar with it.

  1. What advice would give you to future ateam contributors?

The only thing you need to do is bring your question to irc and ask. Do not hesitate to ask for help if you need it! All the people in here are nice and willing to help. Enjoy it!

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

William Lachance: More Perfherder updates

Mozilla planet - fr, 07/08/2015 - 06:00

Since my last update, we’ve been trucking along with improvements to Perfherder, the project for making Firefox performance sheriffing and analysis easier.

Compare visualization improvements

I’ve been spending quite a bit of time trying to fix up the display of information in the compare view, to address feedback from developers and hopefully generally streamline things. Vladan (from the perf team) referred me to Blake Winton, who provided tons of awesome suggestions on how to present things more concisely.

Here’s an old versus new picture:

Screen Shot 2015-07-14 at 3.53.20 PM Screen Shot 2015-08-07 at 1.57.39 PM

Summary of significant changes in this view:

  • Removed or consolidated several types of numerical information which were overwhelming or confusing (e.g. presenting both numerical and percentage standard deviation in their own columns).
  • Added tooltips all over the place to explain what’s being displayed.
  • Highlight more strongly when it appears there aren’t enough runs to make a definitive determination on whether there was a regression or improvement.
  • Improve display of visual indicator of magnitude of regression/improvement (providing a pseudo-scale showing where the change ranges from 0% – 20%+).
  • Provide more detail on the two changesets being compared in the header and make it easier to retrigger them (thanks to Mike Ling).
  • Much better and more intuitive error handling when something goes wrong (also thanks to Mike Ling).

The point of these changes isn’t necessarily to make everything “immediately obvious” to people. We’re not building general purpose software here: Perfherder will always be a rather specialized tool which presumes significant domain knowledge on the part of the people using it. However, even for our audience, it turns out that there’s a lot of room to improve how our presentation: reducing the amount of extraneous noise helps people zero in on the things they really need to care about.

Special thanks to everyone who took time out of their schedules to provide so much good feedback, in particular Avi Halmachi, Glandium, and Joel Maher.

Of course more suggestions are always welcome. Please give it a try and file bugs against the perfherder component if you find anything you’d like to see changed or improved.

Getting the word out

Hammersmith:mozilla-central wlach$ hg push -f try pushing to ssh://hg.mozilla.org/try no revisions specified to push; using . to avoid pushing multiple heads searching for changes remote: waiting for lock on repository /repo/hg/mozilla/try held by 'hgssh1.dmz.scl3.mozilla.com:8270' remote: got lock after 4 seconds remote: adding changesets remote: adding manifests remote: adding file changes remote: added 1 changesets with 1 changes to 1 files remote: Trying to insert into pushlog. remote: Inserted into the pushlog db successfully. remote: remote: View your change here: remote: https://hg.mozilla.org/try/rev/e0aa56fb4ace remote: remote: Follow the progress of your build on Treeherder: remote: https://treeherder.mozilla.org/#/jobs?repo=try&revision=e0aa56fb4ace remote: remote: It looks like this try push has talos jobs. Compare performance against a baseline revision: remote: https://treeherder.mozilla.org/perf.html#/comparechooser?newProject=try&newRevision=e0aa56fb4ace

Try pushes incorporating Talos jobs now automatically link to perfherder’s compare view, both in the output from mercurial and in the emails the system sends. One of the challenges we’ve been facing up to this point is just letting developers know that Perfherder exists and it can help them either avoid or resolve performance regressions. I believe this will help.

Data quality and ingestion improvements

Over the past couple weeks, we’ve been comparing our regression detection code when run against Graphserver data to Perfherder data. In doing so, we discovered that we’ve sometimes been using the wrong algorithm (geometric mean) to summarize some of our tests, leading to unexpected and less meaningful results. For example, the v8_7 benchmark uses a custom weighting algorithm for its score, to account for the fact that the things it tests have a particular range of expected values.

To hopefully prevent this from happening again in the future, we’ve decided to move the test summarization code out of Perfherder back into Talos (bug 1184966). This has the additional benefit of creating a stronger connection between the content of the Talos logs and what Perfherder displays in its comparison and graph views, which has thrown people off in the past.

Continuing data challenges

Having better tools for visualizing this stuff is great, but it also highlights some continuing problems we’ve had with data quality. It turns out that our automation setup often produces qualitatively different performance results for the exact same set of data, depending on when and how the tests are run.

A certain amount of random noise is always expected when running performance tests. As much as we might try to make them uniform, our testing machines and environments are just not 100% identical. That we expect and can deal with: our standard approach is just to retrigger runs, to make sure we get a representative sample of data from our population of machines.

The problem comes when there’s a pattern to the noise: we’ve already noticed that tests run on the weekends produce different results (see Joel’s post from a year ago, “A case of the weekends”) but it seems as if there’s other circumstances where one set of results will be different from another, depending on the time that each set of tests was run. Some tests and platforms (e.g. the a11yr suite, MacOS X 10.10) seem particularly susceptible to this issue.

We need to find better ways of dealing with this problem, as it can result in a lot of wasted time and energy, for both sheriffs and developers. See for example bug 1190877, which concerned a completely spurious regression on the tresize benchmark that was initially blamed on some changes to the media code– in this case, Joel speculates that the linux64 test machines we use might have changed from under us in some way, but we really don’t know yet.

I see two approaches possible here:

  1. Figure out what’s causing the same machines to produce qualitatively different result distributions and address that. This is of course the ideal solution, but it requires coordination with other parts of the organization who are likely quite busy and might be hard.
  2. Figure out better ways of detecting and managing these sorts of case. I have noticed that the standard deviation inside the results when we have spurious regressions/improvements tends to be higher (see for example this compare view for the aforementioned “regression”). Knowing what we do, maybe there’s some statistical methods we can use to detect bad data?

For now, I’m leaning towards (2). I don’t think we’ll ever completely solve this problem and I think coming up with better approaches to understanding and managing it will pay the largest dividends. Open to other opinions of course!

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

William Lachance: Perfherder update

Mozilla planet - ti, 14/07/2015 - 06:00

Haven’t been doing enough blogging about Perfherder (our project to make Talos and other per-checkin performance data more useful) recently. Let’s fix that. We’ve been making some good progress, helped in part by a group of new contributors that joined us through an experimental “summer of contribution” program.

Comparison mode

Inspired by Compare Talos, we’ve designed something similar which hooks into the perfherder backend. This has already gotten some interest: see this post on dev.tree-management and this one on dev.platform. We’re working towards building something that will be really useful both for (1) illustrating that the performance regressions we detect are real and (2) helping developers figure out the impact of their changes before they land them.

Screen Shot 2015-07-14 at 3.54.57 PM Screen Shot 2015-07-14 at 3.53.20 PM

Most of the initial work was done by Joel Maher with lots of review for aesthetics and correctness by me. Avi Halmachi from the Performance Team also helped out with the t-test model for detecting the confidence that we have that a difference in performance was real. Lately myself and Mike Ling (one of our summer of contribution members) have been working on further improving the interface for usability — I’m hopeful that we’ll soon have something implemented that’s broadly usable and comprehensible to the Mozilla Firefox and Platform developer community.

Graphs improvements

Although it’s received slightly less attention lately than the comparison view above, we’ve been making steady progress on the graphs view of performance series. Aside from demonstrations and presentations, the primary use case for this is being able to detect visually sustained changes in the result distribution for talos tests, which is often necessary to be able to confirm regressions. Notable recent changes include a much easier way of selecting tests to add to the graph from Mike Ling and more readable/parseable urls from Akhilesh Pillai (another summer of contribution participant).

Screen Shot 2015-07-14 at 4.09.45 PM

Performance alerts

I’ve also been steadily working on making Perfherder generate alerts when there is a significant discontinuity in the performance numbers, similar to what GraphServer does now. Currently we have an option to generate a static CSV file of these alerts, but the eventual plan is to insert these things into a peristent database. After that’s done, we can actually work on creating a UI inside Perfherder to replace alertmanager (which currently uses GraphServer data) and start using this thing to sheriff performance regressions — putting the herder into perfherder.

As part of this, I’ve converted the graphserver alert generation code into a standalone python library, which has already proven useful as a component in the Raptor project for FirefoxOS. Yay modularity and reusability.

Python API

I’ve also been working on creating and improving a python API to access Treeherder data, which includes Perfherder. This lets you do interesting things, like dynamically run various types of statistical analysis on the data stored in the production instance of Perfherder (no need to ask me for a database dump or other credentials). I’ve been using this to perform validation of the data we’re storing and debug various tricky problems. For example, I found out last week that we were storing up to duplicate 200 entries in each performance series due to double data ingestion — oops.

You can also use this API to dynamically create interesting graphs and visualizations using ipython notebook, here’s a simple example of me plotting the last 7 days of youtube.com pageload data inline in a notebook:

Screen Shot 2015-07-14 at 4.43.55 PM

[original]

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mike Conley: Things I’ve Learned This Week (May 25 – May 29, 2015)

Thunderbird - mo, 01/06/2015 - 07:49
MozReview will now create individual attachments for child commits

Up until recently, anytime you pushed a patch series to MozReview, a single attachment would be created on the bug associated with the push.

That single attachment would link to the “parent” or “root” review request, which contains the folded diff of all commits.

We noticed a lot of MozReview users were (rightfully) confused about this mapping from Bugzilla to MozReview. It was not at all obvious that Ship It on the parent review request would cause the attachment on Bugzilla to be r+’d. Consequently, reviewers used a number of workarounds, including, but not limited to:

  1. Manually setting the r+ or r- flags in Bugzilla for the MozReview attachments
  2. Marking Ship It on the child review requests, and letting the reviewee take care of setting the reviewer flags in the commit message
  3. Just writing “r+” in a MozReview comment

Anyhow, this model wasn’t great, and caused a lot of confusion.

So it’s changed! Now, when you push to MozReview, there’s one attachment created for every commit in the push. That means that when different reviewers are set for different commits, that’s reflected in the Bugzilla attachments, and when those reviewers mark “Ship It” on a child commit, that’s also reflected in an r+ on the associated Bugzilla attachment!

I think this makes quite a bit more sense. Hopefully you do too!

See gps’s blog post for the nitty gritty details, and some other cool MozReview announcements!

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Rumbling Edge - Thunderbird: 2015-05-26 Calendar builds

Thunderbird - wo, 27/05/2015 - 10:26

Common (excluding Website bugs)-specific: (23)

  • Fixed: 735253 – JavaScript Error: “TypeError: calendar is null” {file: “chrome://calendar/content/calendar-task-editing.js” line: 102}
  • Fixed: 768207 – Make the cache checkbox default-on in the new calendar dialog
  • Fixed: 1049591 – Fix lots of strict warnings
  • Fixed: 1086573 – Lightning and Thunderbird disagree about timezone support in ics files
  • Fixed: 1099592 – Make JS callers of ios.newChannel call ios.newChannel2 in calendar/
  • Fixed: 1149423 – Add Windows timezone names to list of aliases
  • Fixed: 1151011 – Calendar events show up on wrong day when printing
  • Fixed: 1151440 – Choose a color not responsive when creating a New calendar in Lightning 4.0b1
  • Fixed: 1153327 – Run compare-locales with merging for Lightning
  • Fixed: 1156015 – Email scheduling fails for recipients with URN id
  • Fixed: 1158036 – Support sendMailTo for URN type attendees
  • Fixed: 1159447 – TEST-UNEXPECTED-FAIL | xpcshell-icaljs.ini:calendar/test/unit/test_extract.js
  • Fixed: 1159638 – Getter fails in calender-migration-dialog on first run after installation
  • Fixed: 1159682 – Provide a more appropriate “learn more” page on integrated Lightning firstrun
  • Fixed: 1159698 – Opt-out dialog has a button for “disable”, but actually the addon is removed
  • Fixed: 1160728 – Unbreak Lightning 4.0b4 beta builds
  • Fixed: 1162300 – TEST-UNEXPECTED-FAIL | xpcshell-libical.ini:calendar/test/unit/test_alarm.js | xpcshell return code: 0
  • Fixed: 1163306 – Re-enable libical tests and disable ical.js in nightly builds when binary compatibility is back
  • Fixed: 1165002 – Lightning broken, tries to load libical backend although “calendar.icaljs” defaults to “true”
  • Fixed: 1165315 – TEST-UNEXPECTED-FAIL | xpcshell-icaljs.ini:calendar/test/unit/test_bug759324.js | xpcshell return code: 1 | ###!!! ASSERTION: Deprecated, use NewChannelFromURI2 providing loadInfo arguments!
  • Fixed: 1165497 – TEST-UNEXPECTED-FAIL | xpcshell-icaljs.ini:calendar/test/unit/test_alarmservice.js | xpcshell return code: -11
  • Fixed: 1165726 – TEST-UNEXPECTED-FAIL | /builds/slave/test/build/tests/mozmill/testBasicFunctionality.js | testBasicFunctionality.js::testSmokeTest
  • Fixed: 1165728 – TEST-UNEXPECTED-FAIL | xpcshell-icaljs.ini:calendar/test/unit/test_bug494140.js | xpcshell return code: -11

Sunbird will no longer be actively developed by the Calendar team.

Windows builds Official Windows

Linux builds Official Linux (i686), Official Linux (x86_64)

Mac builds Official Mac

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Rumbling Edge - Thunderbird: 2015-05-26 Thunderbird comm-central builds

Thunderbird - wo, 27/05/2015 - 10:25

Thunderbird-specific: (54)

  • Fixed: 401779 – Integrate Lightning Into Thunderbird by Default and Ship Thunderbird with Lightning Enabled
  • Fixed: 717292 – Spell check language setting for subject and body not synchronized, but temporarily appears so when changing language and depending on focus (confusing ux)
  • Fixed: 914225 – Support hotfix add-on in Thunderbird
  • Fixed: 1025547 – newmailaccount/jquery.tmpl.js, line 123: reference to undefined property def[1]
  • Fixed: 1088975 – Answering mail with sendername containing encoded special chars and comma creates two “To”-entries
  • Fixed: 1101237 – Remove distribution directory during install
  • Fixed: 1109178 – Thunderbird OAuth implementation does not work with Evernote
  • Fixed: 1110166 – Port |Bug 1102219 – Rename String.prototype.contains to String.prototype.includes| to comm-central
  • Fixed: 1113097 – Fix misuse of fixIterator
  • Fixed: 1130854 – Package Lightning with Thunderbird
  • Fixed: 1131997 – Adapt for Debugger Server code for changes in bug 1059308
  • Fixed: 1135291 – Update chat log entries added to Gloda since bug 955292 to use relative paths
  • Fixed: 1135588 – New conversations get indexed twice by gloda, leading to duplicate search results
  • Fixed: 1138154 – Plugins default to “always activate” in Thunderbird
  • Fixed: 1142879 – [meta] track Mozilla-central (Core) issues that we want to have fixed in TB38
  • Fixed: 1146698 – Chat Messages added to logs just before shutdown may not be indexed by gloda
  • Fixed: 1148330 – Font indicator doesn’t update when cursor is placed in text where core returns sans-serif (Windows). Serif and monospace don’t work (Linux).
  • Fixed: 1148512 – TEST-UNEXPECTED-FAIL | mailnews/imap/test/unit/test_dod.js | xpcshell return code: 0||1 | streamMessages – [streamMessages : 94] false == true | application crashed [@ mozalloc_abort(char const * const)]
  • Fixed: 1149059 – splitter in compose window can be resized down to completely obscure composition area
  • Fixed: 1151206 – Using a theme hides minimize, maximize and close button in composer window [Mac]
  • Fixed: 1151475 – Remove use of expression closures in mail/
  • Fixed: 1152299 – [autoconfig] Cosmetic changes for WEB.DE config
  • Fixed: 1152706 – Upgrade to Correspondents column (combined To/From column) too agressive
  • Fixed: 1152796 – chrome://messenger/content/folderDisplay.js, line 697: TypeError: this._savedColumnStates.correspondentCol is undefined
  • Fixed: 1152926 – New mail sound preview doesn’t work for default system sound on Mac OS X
  • Fixed: 1154737 – Permafail: TEST-UNEXPECTED-FAIL | toolkit/components/telemetry/tests/unit/test_TelemetryPing.js | xpcshell return code: 0
  • Fixed: 1154747 – TEST-UNEXPECTED-FAIL | /builds/slave/test/build/tests/mozmill/session-store/test-session-store.js | test-session-store.js::test_message_pane_height_persistence
  • Fixed: 1156669 – Trash folder duplication while using IMAP with localized TB
  • Fixed: 1157236 – In-content dialogs: Port bug 1043612, bug 1148923 and bug 1141031 to TB
  • Fixed: 1157649 – TEST-UNEXPECTED-FAIL | dom/push/test/xpcshell/test_clearAll_successful.js (and most other push tests)
  • Fixed: 1158824 – Port bug 138009 to fix packaging errors | Missing file(s): bin/defaults/autoconfig/platform.js
  • Fixed: 1159448 – Thunderbird ignores proxy settings on POP3S protocol
  • Fixed: 1159627 – resource:///modules/dbViewWrapper.js, line 560: SyntaxError: unreachable code after return statement
  • Fixed: 1159630 – components/glautocomp.js, line 155: SyntaxError: unreachable code after return statement
  • Fixed: 1159676 – mailnews/mime/jsmime/test/test_custom_headers.js | run_next_test 0 – TypeError: _gRunningTest is undefined at /builds/slave/test/build/tests/xpcshell/head.js:1435 (and other jsmime tests)
  • Fixed: 1159688 – After switching/changing the window layout, dragging the splitter between threadpane and messagepane can create gray/grey area/space (misplaced notificationbox)
  • Fixed: 1159815 – Take bug 1154791 “Inline spell checker loses red underlines after a backspace is used – take two” in Thunderbird 38
  • Fixed: 1159817 – Take “Bug 1100966 – Inline spell checker loses red underlines after a backspace is used” in Thunderbird 38
  • Fixed: 1159834 – Consider taking “Bug 756984 – Changing location in editor doesn’t preserve the font when returning to end of text/line” in Thunderbird 38
  • Fixed: 1159923 – Take bug 1140105 “Can’t query for a specific font face when the selection is collapsed” in TB 38
  • Fixed: 1160105 – Fix strict mode warnings in protovis-r2.6-modded.js
  • Fixed: 1160106 – “Searching…” spinner at the bottom of gloda search results never goes away
  • Fixed: 1160114 – Strict mode warnings on faceted search
  • Fixed: 1160805 – Missing Windows and Linux nightly builds, build step set props: previous_buildid fails
  • Fixed: 1161162 – “Join Chat” doesn’t focus the newly joined MUC
  • Fixed: 1162396 – Take bug 1140617 “Pasting an image loses the composition style” in TB38
  • Fixed: 1163086 – Take bug 967494 “changing spellcheck language in one composition window affects all open and new compositions” in TB38
  • Fixed: 1163299 – “TypeError: getBrowser(…) is null” in contentAreaClick with Lightning installed and started in calendar view
  • Fixed: 1163343 – Incorrectly formatted error message “sending failed”
  • Fixed: 1164415 – Error in comment for imapEnterServerPasswordPrompt
  • Fixed: 1164658 – TypeError: Cc[‘@mozilla.org/weave/service;1’] is undefined at resource://gre/modules/FxAccountsWebChannel.jsm:227
  • Fixed: 1164707 – missing toolkit_perfmonitoring.xpt in aurora builds
  • Fixed: 1165152 – Take bug 1154894 in TB 38 branch: Disable test_plugin_default_state.js so Thunderbird can ship with plugins disabled by default
  • Fixed: 1165320 – TEST-UNEXPECTED-FAIL | /builds/slave/test/build/tests/mozmill/notification/test-notification.js

MailNews Core-specific: (30)

  • Fixed: 610533 – crash [@ nsMsgDatabase::GetSearchResultsTable(char const*, int, nsIMdbTable**)] with virtual folder
  • Fixed: 745664 – Rename Address book aaa to aaa_test, delete another address book bbb, and renamed address book aaa_test will lose its name and appear deleted after restart (dataloss! involving localized names)
  • Fixed: 777770 – get rid of nsVoidArray from /mailnews
  • Fixed: 786141 – Use nsIFile.exists() instead of stat to check the existence of the file
  • Fixed: 1069790 – Email addresses with parenthesis are not pretty-printed anymore
  • Fixed: 1072611 – Ctrl+P not working from Composition’s Print Preview window
  • Fixed: 1099587 – Make JS callers of ios.newChannel call ios.newChannel2 in mail/ and mailnews/
  • Fixed: 1130248 – |To: “foo@example.com” <foo@example.com>| becomes |”foo@example.comfoo”@example.com| when I compose mail to it
  • Fixed: 1138220 – some headers are not not properly capitalized
  • Fixed: 1141446 – Behaviour of malformed rfc2047 encoded From message header inconsistent
  • Fixed: 1143569 – User-agent error when posting to NNTP due to RFC5536 violation of Tb (user-agent header is folded just after user-agent:, “user-agent:[CRLF][SP]Mozilla…”)
  • Fixed: 1144693 – Disable libnotify usage on Linux by default for new-mail notifications (doesn’t always work after bug 858919)
  • Fixed: 1149320 – fix compile warnings in mailnews/extensions/
  • Fixed: 1150891 – Port package-manifest.in changes from Bug 1115495 – Part 2: PAC generator for browsing and system wide proxy
  • Fixed: 1151782 – Inputting 29th Feb as a birthday in the addressbook contact replaces it with 1st Mar.
  • Fixed: 1152364 – crash in Address Book via nsAbBSDirectory::GetChildNodes nsCOMArrayEnumerator::operator new(unsigned int, nsCOMArray_base const&)
  • Fixed: 1152989 – Account Manager Extensions broken in Thunderbird 37/38
  • Fixed: 1154521 – jsmime fails on long references header and e-mail gets sent and stored in Sent without headers
  • Fixed: 1155491 – Support autoconfig and manual config of gmail IMAP OAuth2 authentication
  • Fixed: 1155952 – Nesting level does not match indentation
  • Fixed: 1156691 – GUI “Edit filters”: Conditions/actions (for specfic accounts) not visible
  • Fixed: 1156777 – nsParseMailbox.cpp:505:55: error: ‘do_QueryObject’ was not declared in this scope
  • Fixed: 1158501 – Port bug 1039866 (metro code removal) and bug 1085557 (addition of socorro symbol upload API)
  • Fixed: 1158751 – Port NO_JS_MANIFEST changes | mozbuild.frontend.reader.SandboxValidationError: calendar/base/backend/icaljs/moz.build
  • Fixed: 1159255 – Build error: MSVC_ENABLE_PGO = True is not permitted to be used in mailnews/intl/moz.build
  • Fixed: 1159626 – chrome://messenger/content/accountUtils.js, line 455: SyntaxError: unreachable code after return statement
  • Fixed: 1160647 – Port |Bug 1159972 – Remove the fallible version of PL_DHashTableInit()| to comm-central
  • Fixed: 1163347 – Don’t require scope in ispdb config for OAuth2
  • Fixed: 1165737 – Fix usage of NS_LITERAL_CSTRING in mailnews, port Bug 1155963 to comm-central
  • Fixed: 1166842 – Re-enable binary extensions for comm-central

Windows builds Official Windows, Official Windows installer

Linux builds Official Linux (i686), Official Linux (x86_64)

Mac builds Official Mac

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Andrew Sutherland: Talk Script: Firefox OS Email Performance Strategies

Thunderbird - to, 30/04/2015 - 22:11

Last week I gave a talk at the Philly Tech Week 2015 Dev Day organized by the delightful people at technical.ly on some of the tricks/strategies we use in the Firefox OS Gaia Email app.  Note that the credit for implementing most of these techniques goes to the owner of the Email app’s front-end, James Burke.  Also, a special shout-out to Vivien for the initial DOM Worker patches for the email app.

I tried to avoid having slides that both I would be reading aloud as the audience read silently, so instead of slides to share, I have the talk script.  Well, I also have the slides here, but there’s not much to them.  The headings below are the content of the slides, except for the one time I inline some code.  Note that the live presentation must have differed slightly, because I’m sure I’m much more witty and clever in person than this script would make it seem…

Cover Slide: Who!

Hi, my name is Andrew Sutherland.  I work at Mozilla on the Firefox OS Email Application.  I’m here to share some strategies we used to make our HTML5 app Seem faster and sometimes actually Be faster.

What’s A Firefox OS (Screenshot Slide)

But first: What is a Firefox OS?  It’s a multiprocess Firefox gecko engine on an android linux kernel where all the apps including the system UI are implemented using HTML5, CSS, and JavaScript.  All the apps use some combination of standard web APIs and APIs that we hope to standardize in some form.

Firefox OS homescreen screenshot Firefox OS clock app screenshot Firefox OS email app screenshot

Here are some screenshots.  We’ve got the default home screen app, the clock app, and of course, the email app.

It’s an entirely client-side offline email application, supporting IMAP4, POP3, and ActiveSync.  The goal, like all Firefox OS apps shipped with the phone, is to give native apps on other platforms a run for their money.

And that begins with starting up fast.

Fast Startup: The Problems

But that’s frequently easier said than done.  Slow-loading websites are still very much a thing.

The good news for the email application is that a slow network isn’t one of its problems.  It’s pre-loaded on the phone.  And even if it wasn’t, because of the security implications of the TCP Web API and the difficulty of explaining this risk to users in a way they won’t just click through, any TCP-using app needs to be a cryptographically signed zip file approved by a marketplace.  So we do load directly from flash.

However, it’s not like flash on cellphones is equivalent to an infinitely fast, zero-latency network connection.  And even if it was, in a naive app you’d still try and load all of your HTML, CSS, and JavaScript at the same time because the HTML file would reference them all.  And that adds up.

It adds up in the form of event loop activity and competition with other threads and processes.  With the exception of Promises which get their own micro-task queue fast-lane, the web execution model is the same as all other UI event loops; events get scheduled and then executed in the same order they are scheduled.  Loading data from an asynchronous API like IndexedDB means that your read result gets in line behind everything else that’s scheduled.  And in the case of the bulk of shipped Firefox OS devices, we only have a single processor core so the thread and process contention do come into play.

So we try not to be a naive.

Seeming Fast at Startup: The HTML Cache

If we’re going to optimize startup, it’s good to start with what the user sees.  Once an account exists for the email app, at startup we display the default account’s inbox folder.

What is the least amount of work that we can do to show that?  Cache a screenshot of the Inbox.  The problem with that, of course, is that a static screenshot is indistinguishable from an unresponsive application.

So we did the next best thing, (which is) we cache the actual HTML we display.  At startup we load a minimal HTML file, our concatenated CSS, and just enough Javascript to figure out if we should use the HTML cache and then actually use it if appropriate.  It’s not always appropriate, like if our application is being triggered to display a compose UI or from a new mail notification that wants to show a specific message or a different folder.  But this is a decision we can make synchronously so it doesn’t slow us down.

Local Storage: Okay in small doses

We implement this by storing the HTML in localStorage.

Important Disclaimer!  LocalStorage is a bad API.  It’s a bad API because it’s synchronous.  You can read any value stored in it at any time, without waiting for a callback.  Which means if the data is not in memory the browser needs to block its event loop or spin a nested event loop until the data has been read from disk.  Browsers avoid this now by trying to preload the Entire contents of local storage for your origin into memory as soon as they know your page is being loaded.  And then they keep that information, ALL of it, in memory until your page is gone.

So if you store a megabyte of data in local storage, that’s a megabyte of data that needs to be loaded in its entirety before you can use any of it, and that hangs around in scarce phone memory.

To really make the point: do not use local storage, at least not directly.  Use a library like localForage that will use IndexedDB when available, and then fails over to WebSQLDatabase and local storage in that order.

Now, having sufficiently warned you of the terrible evils of local storage, I can say with a sorta-clear conscience… there are upsides in this very specific case.

The synchronous nature of the API means that once we get our turn in the event loop we can act immediately.  There’s no waiting around for an IndexedDB read result to gets its turn on the event loop.

This matters because although the concept of loading is simple from a User Experience perspective, there’s no standard to back it up right now.  Firefox OS’s UX desires are very straightforward.  When you tap on an app, we zoom it in.  Until the app is loaded we display the app’s icon in the center of the screen.  Unfortunately the standards are still assuming that the content is right there in the HTML.  This works well for document-based web pages or server-powered web apps where the contents of the page are baked in.  They work less well for client-only web apps where the content lives in a database and has to be dynamically retrieved.

The two events that exist are:

DOMContentLoaded” fires when the document has been fully parsed and all scripts not tagged as “async” have run.  If there were stylesheets referenced prior to the script tags, the script tags will wait for the stylesheet loads.

load” fires when the document has been fully loaded; stylesheets, images, everything.

But none of these have anything to do with the content in the page saying it’s actually done.  This matters because these standards also say nothing about IndexedDB reads or the like.  We tried to create a standards consensus around this, but it’s not there yet.  So Firefox OS just uses the “load” event to decide an app or page has finished loading and it can stop showing your app icon.  This largely avoids the dreaded “flash of unstyled content” problem, but it also means that your webpage or app needs to deal with this period of time by displaying a loading UI or just accepting a potentially awkward transient UI state.

(Trivial HTML slide)

<link rel=”stylesheet” ...> <script ...></script> DOMContentLoaded!

This is the important summary of our index.html.

We reference our stylesheet first.  It includes all of our styles.  We never dynamically load stylesheets because that compels a style recalculation for all nodes and potentially a reflow.  We would have to have an awful lot of style declarations before considering that.

Then we have our single script file.  Because the stylesheet precedes the script, our script will not execute until the stylesheet has been loaded.  Then our script runs and we synchronously insert our HTML from local storage.  Then DOMContentLoaded can fire.  At this point the layout engine has enough information to perform a style recalculation and determine what CSS-referenced image resources need to be loaded for buttons and icons, then those load, and then we’re good to be displayed as the “load” event can fire.

After that, we’re displaying an interactive-ish HTML document.  You can scroll, you can press on buttons and the :active state will apply.  So things seem real.

Being Fast: Lazy Loading and Optimized Layers

But now we need to try and get some logic in place as quickly as possible that will actually cash the checks that real-looking HTML UI is writing.  And the key to that is only loading what you need when you need it, and trying to get it to load as quickly as possible.

There are many module loading and build optimizing tools out there, and most frameworks have a preferred or required way of handling this.  We used the RequireJS family of Asynchronous Module Definition loaders, specifically the alameda loader and the r-dot-js optimizer.

One of the niceties of the loader plugin model is that we are able to express resource dependencies as well as code dependencies.

RequireJS Loader Plugins

var fooModule = require('./foo'); var htmlString = require('text!./foo.html'); var localizedDomNode = require('tmpl!./foo.html');

The standard Common JS loader semantics used by node.js and io.js are the first one you see here.  Load the module, return its exports.

But RequireJS loader plugins also allow us to do things like the second line where the exclamation point indicates that the load should occur using a loader plugin, which is itself a module that conforms to the loader plugin contract.  In this case it’s saying load the file foo.html as raw text and return it as a string.

But, wait, there’s more!  loader plugins can do more than that.  The third example uses a loader that loads the HTML file using the ‘text’ plugin under the hood, creates an HTML document fragment, and pre-localizes it using our localization library.  And this works un-optimized in a browser, no compilation step needed, but it can also be optimized.

So when our optimizer runs, it bundles up the core modules we use, plus, the modules for our “message list” card that displays the inbox.  And the message list card loads its HTML snippets using the template loader plugin.  The r-dot-js optimizer then locates these dependencies and the loader plugins also have optimizer logic that results in the HTML strings being inlined in the resulting optimized file.  So there’s just one single javascript file to load with no extra HTML file dependencies or other loads.

We then also run the optimizer against our other important cards like the “compose” card and the “message reader” card.  We don’t do this for all cards because it can be hard to carve up the module dependency graph for optimization without starting to run into cases of overlap where many optimized files redundantly include files loaded by other optimized files.

Plus, we have another trick up our sleeve:

Seeming Fast: Preloading

Preloading.  Our cards optionally know the other cards they can load.  So once we display a card, we can kick off a preload of the cards that might potentially be displayed.  For example, the message list card can trigger the compose card and the message reader card, so we can trigger a preload of both of those.

But we don’t go overboard with preloading in the frontend because we still haven’t actually loaded the back-end that actually does all the emaily email stuff.  The back-end is also chopped up into optimized layers along account type lines and online/offline needs, but the main optimized JS file still weighs in at something like 17 thousand lines of code with newlines retained.

So once our UI logic is loaded, it’s time to kick-off loading the back-end.  And in order to avoid impacting the responsiveness of the UI both while it loads and when we’re doing steady-state processing, we run it in a DOM Worker.

Being Responsive: Workers and SharedWorkers

DOM Workers are background JS threads that lack access to the page’s DOM, communicating with their owning page via message passing with postMessage.  Normal workers are owned by a single page.  SharedWorkers can be accessed via multiple pages from the same document origin.

By doing this, we stay out of the way of the main thread.  This is getting less important as browser engines support Asynchronous Panning & Zooming or “APZ” with hardware-accelerated composition, tile-based rendering, and all that good stuff.  (Some might even call it magic.)

When Firefox OS started, we didn’t have APZ, so any main-thread logic had the serious potential to result in janky scrolling and the impossibility of rendering at 60 frames per second.  It’s a lot easier to get 60 frames-per-second now, but even asynchronous pan and zoom potentially has to wait on dispatching an event to the main thread to figure out if the user’s tap is going to be consumed by app logic and preventDefault called on it.  APZ does this because it needs to know whether it should start scrolling or not.

And speaking of 60 frames-per-second…

Being Fast: Virtual List Widgets

…the heart of a mail application is the message list.  The expected UX is to be able to fling your way through the entire list of what the email app knows about and see the messages there, just like you would on a native app.

This is admittedly one of the areas where native apps have it easier.  There are usually list widgets that explicitly have a contract that says they request data on an as-needed basis.  They potentially even include data bindings so you can just point them at a data-store.

But HTML doesn’t yet have a concept of instantiate-on-demand for the DOM, although it’s being discussed by Firefox layout engine developers.  For app purposes, the DOM is a scene graph.  An extremely capable scene graph that can handle huge documents, but there are footguns and it’s arguably better to err on the side of fewer DOM nodes.

So what the email app does is we create a scroll-region div and explicitly size it based on the number of messages in the mail folder we’re displaying.  We create and render enough message summary nodes to cover the current screen, 3 screens worth of messages in the direction we’re scrolling, and then we also retain up to 3 screens worth in the direction we scrolled from.  We also pre-fetch 2 more screens worth of messages from the database.  These constants were arrived at experimentally on prototype devices.

We listen to “scroll” events and issue database requests and move DOM nodes around and update them as the user scrolls.  For any potentially jarring or expensive transitions such as coordinate space changes from new messages being added above the current scroll position, we wait for scrolling to stop.

Nodes are absolutely positioned within the scroll area using their ‘top’ style but translation transforms also work.  We remove nodes from the DOM, then update their position and their state before re-appending them.  We do this because the browser APZ logic tries to be clever and figure out how to create an efficient series of layers so that it can pre-paint as much of the DOM as possible in graphic buffers, AKA layers, that can be efficiently composited by the GPU.  Its goal is that when the user is scrolling, or something is being animated, that it can just move the layers around the screen or adjust their opacity or other transforms without having to ask the layout engine to re-render portions of the DOM.

When our message elements are added to the DOM with an already-initialized absolute position, the APZ logic lumps them together as something it can paint in a single layer along with the other elements in the scrolling region.  But if we start moving them around while they’re still in the DOM, the layerization logic decides that they might want to independently move around more in the future and so each message item ends up in its own layer.  This slows things down.  But by removing them and re-adding them it sees them as new with static positions and decides that it can lump them all together in a single layer.  Really, we could just create new DOM nodes, but we produce slightly less garbage this way and in the event there’s a bug, it’s nicer to mess up with 30 DOM nodes displayed incorrectly rather than 3 million.

But as neat as the layerization stuff is to know about on its own, I really mention it to underscore 2 suggestions:

1, Use a library when possible.  Getting on and staying on APZ fast-paths is not trivial, especially across browser engines.  So it’s a very good idea to use a library rather than rolling your own.

2, Use developer tools.  APZ is tricky to reason about and even the developers who write the Async pan & zoom logic can be surprised by what happens in complex real-world situations.  And there ARE developer tools available that help you avoid needing to reason about this.  Firefox OS has easy on-device developer tools that can help diagnose what’s going on or at least help tell you whether you’re making things faster or slower:

– it’s got a frames-per-second overlay; you do need to scroll like mad to get the system to want to render 60 frames-per-second, but it makes it clear what the net result is

– it has paint flashing that overlays random colors every time it paints the DOM into a layer.  If the screen is flashing like a discotheque or has a lot of smeared rainbows, you know something’s wrong because the APZ logic is not able to to just reuse its layers.

– devtools can enable drawing cool colored borders around the layers APZ has created so you can see if layerization is doing something crazy

There’s also fancier and more complicated tools in Firefox and other browsers like Google Chrome to let you see what got painted, what the layer tree looks like, et cetera.

And that’s my spiel.

Links

The source code to Gaia can be found at https://github.com/mozilla-b2g/gaia

The email app in particular can be found at https://github.com/mozilla-b2g/gaia/tree/master/apps/email

(I also asked for questions here.)

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

William Lachance: PyCon 2015

Mozilla planet - to, 23/04/2015 - 06:00

So I went to PyCon 2015. While I didn’t leave quite as inspired as I did in 2014 (when I discovered iPython), it was a great experience and I learned a ton. Once again, I was incredibly impressed with the organization of the conference and the diversity and quality of the speakers.

Since Mozilla was nice enough to sponsor my attendance, I figured I should do another round up of notable talks that I went to.

Technical stuff that was directly relevant to what I work on:

  • To ORM or not to ORM (Christine Spang): Useful talk on when using a database ORM (object relational manager) can be helpful and even faster than using a database directly. I feel like there’s a lot of misinformation and FUD on this topic, so this was refreshing to see. video slides
  • Debugging hard problems (Alex Gaynor): Exactly what it says — how to figure out what’s going on when things aren’t behaving as they should. Great advice and wisdom in this one (hint: take nothing for granted, dive into the source of everything you’re using!). video slides
  • Python Performance Profiling: The Guts And The Glory (Jesse Jiryu Davis): Quite an entertaining talk on how to properly profile python code. I really liked his systematic and realistic approach — which also discussed the thought process behind how to do this (hint: again it comes down to understanding what’s really going on). Unfortunately the video is truncated, but even the first few minutes are useful. video

Non-technical stuff:

  • The Ethical Consequences Of Our Collective Activities (Glyph): A talk on the ethical implications of how our software is used. I feel like this is an under-discussed topic — how can we know that the results of our activity (programming) serves others and does not harm? video
  • How our engineering environments are killing diversity (and how we can fix it) (Kate Heddleston): This was a great talk on how to make the environments in which we develop more welcoming to under-represented groups (women, minorities, etc.). This is something I’ve been thinking a bunch about lately, especially in the context of expanding the community of people working on our projects in Automation & Tools. The talk had some particularly useful advice (to me, anyway) on giving feedback. video slides

I probably missed out on a bunch of interesting things. If you also went to PyCon, please feel free to add links to your favorite talks in the comments!

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Thunderbird Blog: Thunderbird 38 goes to beta!

Thunderbird - fr, 03/04/2015 - 11:13

The next major release of Thunderbird, version 38, is now in beta and available for testing. You may download Thunderbird 38.0b1 here.

This version of Thunderbird is the first that is mostly managed by volunteer community members rather than by Mozilla staff. We have many new features, including:

  • Message filtering when a message is sent or archived
  • File-per-message local storage available for new accounts (maildir)
  • Contact search over multiple address books
  • Internationalized domain names for RSS feeds
  • Allow expanded columns to the folder pane for folder size and counts

Release notes are available here.

There are still a couple of features missing from this beta that we hope to ship in the final version of Thunderbird 38. Those are:

  • Ship Lightning calendar addon with Thunderbird with an opt-out dialog
  • Use OAUTH authentication with Gmail IMAP accounts

 

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Joshua Cranmer: Breaking news

Thunderbird - wo, 01/04/2015 - 09:00
It was brought to my attention recently by reputable sources that the recent announcement of increased usage in recent years produced an internal firestorm within Mozilla. Key figures raised alarm that some of the tech press had interpreted the blog post as a sign that Thunderbird was not, in fact, dead. As a result, they asked Thunderbird community members to make corrections to emphasize that Mozilla was trying to kill Thunderbird.

The primary fear, it seems, is that knowledge that the largest open-source email client was still receiving regular updates would impel its userbase to agitate for increased funding and maintenance of the client to help forestall potential threats to the open nature of email as well as to innovate in the space of providing usable and private communication channels. Such funding, however, would be an unaffordable luxury and would only distract Mozilla from its central goal of building developer productivity tooling. Persistent rumors that Mozilla would be willing to fund Thunderbird were it renamed Firefox Email were finally addressed with the comment, "such a renaming would violate our current policy that all projects be named Persona."

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Thunderbird Blog: Thunderbird Usage Continues to Grow

Thunderbird - fr, 27/02/2015 - 23:44

We’re happy to report that Thunderbird usage continues to expand.

Mozilla measures program usage by Active Daily Installations (ADI), which is the number of pings that Mozilla servers receive as installations do their daily plugin block-list update. This is not the same as the number of active users, since some users don’t access their program each day, and some installations are behind firewalls. An estimate of active monthly users is typically done by multiplying the ADI by a factor of 3.

To plot changes in Thunderbird usage over time, I’ve picked the peak ADI for each month for the last few years. Here’s the result:

Thunderbird Active Daily Installations, peak value per month.

Germany has long been our #1 country for usage, but in 4th quarter 2014, Japan exceeded US as the #2 country. Here’s the top 10 countries, taken from the ADI count of February 24, 2015:

Rank Country ADI 2015-02-24 1 Germany 1,711,834 2 Japan 1,002,877 3 United States 927,477 4 France 777,478 5 Italy 514,771 6 Russian Federation 494,645 7 Poland 480,496 8 Spain 282,008 9 Brazil 265,820 10 United Kingdom 254,381 All Others 2,543,493 Total 9,255,280

Country Rankings for Thunderbird Usage, February 24, 2015

The Thunderbird team is now working hard preparing our next major release, which will be Thunderbird 38 in May 2015. We’ll be blogging more about that release in the next few weeks, including reporting on the many new features that we have added.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

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