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The Mozilla Blog: New Research: Is an Ad-Supported Internet Feasible in Emerging Markets?

Mozilla planet - to, 06/07/2017 - 16:56
Fresh research conducted by Caribou Digital and funded by Mozilla explores digital advertising models in the Global South — whether they can succeed, and what that means for users, businesses, and the health of the Internet

Since the Internet’s earliest days, advertising has been the linchpin of the digital economy, supporting businesses from online journalism to social networking. Indeed, two of the five largest companies in the world — Facebook and Google — earn almost all of their revenue through digital advertising.

As the Internet reaches new users in India, Kenya, and elsewhere across the Global South, this model is following close behind. But is the digital advertising model that has evolved in developed economies sustainable in emerging economies? And if it’s not: What does it mean for the billions of users who are counting on the Internet to unlock new pathways to education, economic growth, and innovation?

Publishers see drastically less revenue per user in these regions, partly because low-income populations are less valuable to advertisers, and partly because constraints on the user experience — low-quality hardware, unreliable network coverage, and a dearth of local content — fundamentally limit how people engage with digital content and services.

As a result, users in emerging markets will have fewer choices, as local content providers and digital businesses will struggle to earn enough from their home markets to compete with the global platforms.

Today, we’re publishing “Paying Attention to the Poor: Digital Advertising in Emerging Markets.”

It’s fresh research conducted by Caribou Digital and funded by Mozilla that explores the barriers traditional digital advertising models face in emerging economies; the consequent impact on users, businesses, and the health of the Internet; and what new models are emerging.  

In summary:

Ad revenue-wise, there is an order-of-magnitude difference between users in developed economies and users in the Global South.

Facebook earns a quarterly ARPU (average revenue per user) of $1.41 in Africa and Latin America, and $2.07 in Asia-Pacific — an order of magnitude less than  the $19.81 it earns in the U.S. and Canada

As a result, just over half of Facebook’s total global revenue comes from only 12% of its users

The high cost of data in emerging markets is one driver of ad blocking

Due to prohibitive data costs and slower network speeds, many Internet users in emerging markets use proxy browsers, such as UC Browser or Opera Mini, which reduce data consumption and also block ads

One report by PageFair claims over 309 million users around the world used mobile ad blockers in 2016 — with 89 million hailing from India and 28 million hailing from Indonesia

A dearth of user data — or, the “personal data gap” — presents another challenge to advertisers.

In developed economies, data profiling and ad targeting has been a boon to advertisers. But in the Global South, people have much smaller digital footprints

Limited online shopping, a glut of open-source Android devices, and a tendency toward multiple, fragmented social media accounts dilutes the value of personal data to advertisers

Limited advertising revenue in emerging markets challenges local innovation and competition.

Publishers and developers follow the money. As a result, content is targeted to, and localized for, developed markets like the U.S. or Japan — even producers in emerging markets will ignore their domestic market in favor of more lucrative ones

Large companies like Facebook have the resources to subsidize forays into unprofitable markets; smaller companies do not. As a result, the reigning giants become further entrenched

A lack of local content can have deeply negative implications.

Availability of local content is a key demand-side driver for increasing Internet access for marginalized populations, and localized media can foster inclusion and support democratic institutions

But without viable economic models for supporting this content, opportunity is squandered. Presently, the majority of digital content — including user-generated content such as Wikipedia — is in English

The outlook for digital advertising-supported businesses in emerging markets is bleak.

Low monetization rates will continue to limit the types of Internet businesses that can flourish in the Global South

To succeed, businesses in the Global South have to build more strategically, working toward profitability (and not user growth) from the very beginning

These constraints demand new business model innovations for an Internet ecosystem that is evolving differently in the Global South

“Sponsored data” or “incentivized action” models which offer free data in return for engagement with an advertiser’s content are one approach to mitigating the access and affordability constraint

Transactional revenue models, such as those seen in digital financial services, will play an increasingly important role as payments infrastructure matures

You can read the full report here.

In the coming weeks and months, Mozilla and Caribou Digital will share our findings with allies across the Internet health space — the network of NGOs, institutions, and individuals who are working toward a more healthy web. We hope our learnings will help unlock innovative solutions that balance commercial success with openness and freedom online.

The post New Research: Is an Ad-Supported Internet Feasible in Emerging Markets? appeared first on The Mozilla Blog.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

New Research: Is an Ad-Supported Internet Feasible in Emerging Markets?

Mozilla Blog - to, 06/07/2017 - 16:56
Fresh research conducted by Caribou Digital and funded by Mozilla explores digital advertising models in the Global South — whether they can succeed, and what that means for users, businesses, and the health of the Internet

Since the Internet’s earliest days, advertising has been the linchpin of the digital economy, supporting businesses from online journalism to social networking. Indeed, two of the five largest companies in the world — Facebook and Google — earn almost all of their revenue through digital advertising.

As the Internet reaches new users in India, Kenya, and elsewhere across the Global South, this model is following close behind. But is the digital advertising model that has evolved in developed economies sustainable in emerging economies? And if it’s not: What does it mean for the billions of users who are counting on the Internet to unlock new pathways to education, economic growth, and innovation?

Publishers see drastically less revenue per user in these regions, partly because low-income populations are less valuable to advertisers, and partly because constraints on the user experience — low-quality hardware, unreliable network coverage, and a dearth of local content — fundamentally limit how people engage with digital content and services.

As a result, users in emerging markets will have fewer choices, as local content providers and digital businesses will struggle to earn enough from their home markets to compete with the global platforms.

Today, we’re publishing “Paying Attention to the Poor: Digital Advertising in Emerging Markets.”

It’s fresh research conducted by Caribou Digital and funded by Mozilla that explores the barriers traditional digital advertising models face in emerging economies; the consequent impact on users, businesses, and the health of the Internet; and what new models are emerging.  

In summary:

Ad revenue-wise, there is an order-of-magnitude difference between users in developed economies and users in the Global South.

Facebook earns a quarterly ARPU (average revenue per user) of $1.41 in Africa and Latin America, and $2.07 in Asia-Pacific — an order of magnitude less than  the $19.81 it earns in the U.S. and Canada

As a result, just over half of Facebook’s total global revenue comes from only 12% of its users

The high cost of data in emerging markets is one driver of ad blocking

Due to prohibitive data costs and slower network speeds, many Internet users in emerging markets use proxy browsers, such as UC Browser or Opera Mini, which reduce data consumption and also block ads

One report by PageFair claims over 309 million users around the world used mobile ad blockers in 2016 — with 89 million hailing from India and 28 million hailing from Indonesia

A dearth of user data — or, the “personal data gap” — presents another challenge to advertisers.

In developed economies, data profiling and ad targeting has been a boon to advertisers. But in the Global South, people have much smaller digital footprints

Limited online shopping, a glut of open-source Android devices, and a tendency toward multiple, fragmented social media accounts dilutes the value of personal data to advertisers

Limited advertising revenue in emerging markets challenges local innovation and competition.

Publishers and developers follow the money. As a result, content is targeted to, and localized for, developed markets like the U.S. or Japan — even producers in emerging markets will ignore their domestic market in favor of more lucrative ones

Large companies like Facebook have the resources to subsidize forays into unprofitable markets; smaller companies do not. As a result, the reigning giants become further entrenched

A lack of local content can have deeply negative implications.

Availability of local content is a key demand-side driver for increasing Internet access for marginalized populations, and localized media can foster inclusion and support democratic institutions

But without viable economic models for supporting this content, opportunity is squandered. Presently, the majority of digital content — including user-generated content such as Wikipedia — is in English

The outlook for digital advertising-supported businesses in emerging markets is bleak.

Low monetization rates will continue to limit the types of Internet businesses that can flourish in the Global South

To succeed, businesses in the Global South have to build more strategically, working toward profitability (and not user growth) from the very beginning

These constraints demand new business model innovations for an Internet ecosystem that is evolving differently in the Global South

“Sponsored data” or “incentivized action” models which offer free data in return for engagement with an advertiser’s content are one approach to mitigating the access and affordability constraint

Transactional revenue models, such as those seen in digital financial services, will play an increasingly important role as payments infrastructure matures

You can read the full report here.

In the coming weeks and months, Mozilla and Caribou Digital will share our findings with allies across the Internet health space — the network of NGOs, institutions, and individuals who are working toward a more healthy web. We hope our learnings will help unlock innovative solutions that balance commercial success with openness and freedom online.

The post New Research: Is an Ad-Supported Internet Feasible in Emerging Markets? appeared first on The Mozilla Blog.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Robert O'Callahan: Bay Area Progress Report

Mozilla planet - to, 06/07/2017 - 08:15

I'm in the middle of a three-week work trip to the USA.

Monday last week I met with a couple of the people behind the Julia programming language, who have been using and contributing to rr. We had good discussions and it's good to put faces to names.

Monday night through to Friday night I was honoured to be a guest at Mozilla's all-hands meeting in San Francisco. I had a really great time catching up with a lot of old friends. I was pleased to find more Mozilla developers using rr than I had known about or expected; they're mostly very happy with the tool and some of them have been using esoteric features like chaos mode with success. We had a talk about rr and I demoed some of the new stuff Kyle and I have been working on, and talked about which directions might be most useful to Mozilla.

Saturday through Monday I went camping in Yosemite National Park with some friends. We camped in the valley on Saturday night, then on Sunday hiked down from Tioga Road (near the Lukens Lake trailhead) along Yosemite Creek to north of Yosemite Falls and camped there overnight. The next day we went up Eagle Peak for a great view over Yosemite Valley, then hiked down past the Falls back to the valley. It's a beautiful place and rather unlike any New Zealand tramping I've done — hot, dry, various sorts of unusual animals, and ever-present reminders about bears. There were a huge number of people in the valley for the holiday weekend!

Tuesday was a bit more relaxed. Being the 4th of July, I spent the afternoon with friends playing games — Bang and Lords of Waterdeep, two of my favourites.

Today I visited Brendan and his team at Brave to talk about rr. On Friday I'll give a talk at Stanford. On Monday I'll be up in Seattle giving a talk at the University of Washington, then on Tuesday I'll be visiting Amazon to talk about the prospects for rr in the cloud. Then on Wednesday through Friday I'll be attending Usenix ATC in Santa Clara and giving yet another rr talk! On Saturday I'll finally go home.

I really enjoy talking to people about my work, and learning more about people's debugging needs, and I really really enjoy spending time with my American friends, but I do miss my family a lot.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Nicholas Nethercote: How we made compiler warnings fatal in Firefox

Mozilla planet - to, 06/07/2017 - 02:11

Compiler warnings are mostly good: they identify real problems, and when false positives do occur they are usually easy to work around. However, if they’re not fatal, they tend to be ignored and build up. (See bug 187528 for an idea!)

One way to prevent the build-up is to make them fatal, so they become errors. But won’t that cause problems? Not if you’re careful. Here’s how we did it for Firefox.

  • Choose with some care which warnings end up fatal. Don’t be afraid to modify your choices as time goes on.
  • Introduce a mechanism for enabling fatal warnings on a per-directory basis. Mozilla’s custom build system used to have a directive called FAIL_ON_WARNINGS for this purpose.
  • Set things up so that fatal warnings are off by default, but enabled on continuous integration (CI). This means the primary coverage is via CI. You don’t want fatal warnings on by default because it causes problems for developers who use non-standard compilers (e.g. pre-release versions with new warning classes). Developers using the same compilers as CI can turn it on locally if they want without problem.
  • Allow per-file exceptions for particular kinds of warnings, because there are occasionally warnings you just want to ignore.
  • Fix warnings one directory at a time, and turn on fatal warnings for that directory as soon as it’s warning-free.
  • Invert the sense of the per-directory mechanism once you’ve converted more than half of the directories. For Mozilla code we now have the ALLOW_COMPILER_WARNINGS directive. It’s almost exclusively used for directories containing third-party code which is not under our control.
  • Gradually expand the coverage of which compilers you have fatal warnings for. Mozilla code now does this for GCC, clang, and MSVC.
  • Congratulations! You now have fatal warnings on everywhere that is practical.

With a setup like this, it’s possible for a patch to compile on a developer’s machine but fail to compile on CI. But that’s just one of many ways in which full CI runs may fail when local runs don’t. So it’s not as bad as it seems.

Also, before upgrading the compilers on CI you need to address any new warnings, by fixing them or suppressing them or filing a compiler bug report. But this isn’t a bad thing.

It took a long time for Firefox to reach this stage, but I think it was worth the effort. Thank you to Chris Peterson and all the others who helped with this.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla Marketing Engineering & Ops Blog: Kuma Report, June 2017

Mozilla planet - to, 06/07/2017 - 02:00

Here’s what happened in June in Kuma, the engine of MDN Web Docs:

  • Shipped the New Design to Beta Testers
  • Added KumaScript macro tests
  • Continued MDN data projects
  • Shipped tweaks and fixes

Here’s the plan for July:

  • Continue the redesign
  • Experiment with on-site interactive examples
  • Update localization of macros
  • Ship the sample database
Done in June Shipped the new design to beta testers

This month, we revealed some long-planned changes. First, MDN is focusing on web docs, which includes changing our identity from “Mozilla Developer Network” to “MDN Web Docs”. Second, we’re shipping a new design to beta users, to reflect Mozilla’s new brand identity as well as the MDN Web Docs brand.

Stephanie Hobson did a tremendous amount of work over 26 Kuma PRs and 2 KumaScript PRs to launch a beta of the updated design on wiki pages. A lot of dead code has been removed, and non-beta users continue to get the current design. Schalk Neethling reviewed the PRs as fast as they were created, including checking the rendering in supported browsers. Our beta users have provided a lot of feedback and found some bugs, which Stephanie has been triaging, tracking, and fixing.

This work continues in July, with an update to the homepage and other pages. When we’ve completed the redesign, we’ll ship the update to all users. If you want to see it early, opt-in as a beta tester.

Added KumaScript Macro Tests

Macros used to be tested manually, in production. After moving the macros to GitHub, they were still tested manually, but in the development environment. In June, Ryan Johnson added an automated testing framework, and tests for five macros, in PR 204. This allows us to mock the Kuma APIs needed for rendering, and to test macros in different locales and situations. This will help us refine and refactor macros in the future.

Continued MDN Data Projects

The MDN data projects were very busy in June, with 48 browser-compat-data PRs and 10 data PRs merged. MDN “writers” Florian Scholz, wbamberg, and Eric Shepherd have been converting MDN browser compatibility tables to JSON data, refining the schema and writing documentation. This is already becoming a community project, with almost half of the PRs coming from contributors such as Andy McKay (1 PR). Dominik Moritz (2 PRs), Roman Dvornov (6 PRs), Ng Yik Phang (2 PRs), and Sebastian Noack (16 PRs!).

The tools and processes are updating as well, to keep up with the activity. browser-compat-data gained a linter in PR 240. mdn-browser-compat-data’s npm package was bumped to version 0.0.2, and then 0.0.3. mdn-data was released as 1.0.0. We’re loading the browser-compat-data from the NPM package in production, and hope to start loading the data NPM package soon.

We’re happy with the progress on the data projects. There’s a lot of work remaining to convert the data on MDN, and also a lot of work to automate the process so that changes are reflected in production as quickly as possible.

Shipped Tweaks and Fixes

Here’s some other highlights from the 44 merged Kuma PRs in June:

Here’s some other highlights from the 31 merged KumaScript PRs in June:

Planned for July Continue the Redesign

Some of the styling for the article pages is shared across other pages, but there is more work to do to complete the redesign. Up next is the homepage, which will change to reflect our new focus on documenting the open web. Other pages will need further work to make the site consistent. When we and the beta testers are mostly happy, we’ll ship the design to all MDN visitors, and then remove the old design code.

Experiment with On-site Interactive Examples

We’re preparing some interactive examples, so that MDN readers can learn by adjusting the code without leaving the site. We’re still working out the details of serving these examples at production scale, so we’re limiting the July release to beta users. You can follow the work at mdn/interactive-examples.

Update Localization of Macros

Currently, KumaScript macros use in-macro localization strings and utility functions like getLocalString to localize output for three to five languages. Meanwhile, user interface strings in Kuma are translated in Pontoon into 57 languages. We’d like to use a similar workflow for strings in macros, and will get started on this process in July.

Ship the Sample Database

The Sample Database has been promised every month since October 2016, and has slipped every month. We almost had to break the tradition, but we can say again it will ship next month. PR 4248, adding the scrape_document command, shipped in June. The final code, PR 4076, is in review, and should be merged in July.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Karl Dubost: Some random thoughts in San Francisco

Mozilla planet - to, 06/07/2017 - 01:09

We had a working business week for Mozilla All Hands. The big bi-annual meeting of the full company to work, discuss, cooperate and make wonderful things.

These are random notes not work related about thoughts accumulated during San Francisco week. What we notice in spaces and people are primary ourselves. It's often the start of a self-introspection more than anything else.

Meeting with my thoughts
  • crossing the border went smoothly. I was feeling good. No mobile device. Blank laptop.
  • Mission street areas from the bus. A bus of wealthy geeks watching the poor, the abandonned, the drifter from up there behind a window. It takes a blaze and spirit to start a revolution. The spirit is drowned inside the body.
  • This insecure feeling of the touristic areas when you never know if and when a driver will plow into the crowd or someone will draw a gun.
  • Chinatown is peaceful and calming environment for me. Something familiar, something I relate to.
  • The charm of the hills of San Francisco is a beautiful pain to my legs. The effort and the view are a gift.
  • Brands using pseudo-political messages to sell more stuff. Nauseous.
  • Exhausted.
  • Sleeping.
  • Plastic surgery is a thing.
  • Cable cars packed with tourists. Do locals still take the cable cars? Private buses to go to Silicon Valley. Dedicated transportation for tourists… What a broken world.
  • Noisy reception, rooms full of people too loud.
  • The emptiness of ads.
  • Long discussion with a friend walking across the San Francisco streets about everything, about nothing, about simple things. On the road, we share.
  • From coit tower, foggy dark Golden Gate vaporized in the horizon.
  • Sirens of fire trucks are frequent
  • A black old man clapped my hand when crossing and wished me a good day. I replied "you too". I don't know if he heard me.
  • I hear the cable cars tongtong tongtong from the hotel window.
  • Things we hear in SF "Oh crap, can someone stash my kinder eggs?"
  • Industrial buildings and hipster shops. The world of rich people is leveled.
  • Freezing wind.
  • Wonderful broth of a Pho Bo
  • A woman shouting "bitch" multiple times at the window of a Carl's restaurant.
  • The feeling of meeting too many people.
  • The feeling of meeting too few people.
  • A perfume shop clerk, old and elegant woman talked to me English, then Japanese, then French. Smile for the day.
  • Missing the cafe latte barista from Whistler All Hands.
  • USA and too big hotel rooms. Ridiculous use of space in a time where everything should be counted and saved.
  • Written culture of street signs.
  • Walking from the hotel to the bye bye event, a moment for long life discussions.
  • American college kids doing bbq. A certain image of USA.
  • Long streets without any shops.
  • overheard: "Let's start the day with a bloody mary" (at the airport at 8am)

Otsukare!

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Ricky Rosario: SUMO Development Update 2012.1

Mozilla planet - wo, 05/07/2017 - 23:31
SUMO Dev goes agile

Inspired by the MDN Dev team, the SUMO Dev team decided to try an agile-style planning process in 2012.

To be fair, we have always been pretty agile, but perhaps we were more on the cowboy side than the waterfall side. We planned our big features for the quarter and worked towards that. Along the way, we picked up (or were thrown) lots of other bugs based on the hot issue of the day or week, contributor requests, scratching our own itch, etc. These bugs ended up taking time away from the major features we set as goals and, in some cases, ended up delaying them. This new process should help us become more predictable.

Starting out by copying what MDN has been doing for some time now, we are doing two week sprints. We will continue to push out new code weekly for now, so it is kind of weird in that each sprint has two two milestones within it. We will continue to name the milestones by the date of the push (ie, "2012-01-24" for today's push) and we are naming sprints as YEAR.sprint_number (ie, "2012.1" was our first sprint). We hope to will be doing continuous deployment soon. At that point we will only have to track one milestone (the sprint) at a time. For more details on our process, check out our Support/SUMOdev Sprints wiki page.

2012.1 sprint

We just pushed the second half of our first sprint to production. Some data:

  • Closed Stories: 26
  • Closed Points: 34
  • Developer Days: 36
  • Velocity: .94 pts/day

Our major focus of this sprint was getting our Elastic Search implementation (we are in the process of switching from Sphinx) to the point where we can index and start rolling it out to users. After today's push, we will find out whether this is working properly. *fingers crossed* (UPDATE: we did hit an issue with the indexing.)

Other stuff we landed:

  • Initial support for the apps marketplace. Basically, a landing page and a question workflow that integrates with zendesk for 1:1 help.
  • KPI (Key Performance Indicator) Dashboard. We landed the first chart which displays % of solved questions (it has a math bug in it that will get fixed in the next push).
  • Some minor UI fixes and improvements.
2012.2 sprint

We are currently halfway through our second sprint. Our main goals with this sprint are to get Elastic Search out to 15% of our users and to add a bunch of new metrics charts to the KPI Dashboard.

In my opinion, this new planning process is going well so far. The product team has better insight into what the dev team is up to day to day. And the dev team has better sense about what the short term priorities are. Probably the most awesome thing about it is that we are collecting lots of great data. The part I have liked the least so far has been the actual planning sessions, I end up pretty tired after those. I think it just needs a little getting used to and it is only 1-2 hours every two weeks.

:-)

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Ricky Rosario: SUMO Development: 2012.3 and 2012.4 Update

Mozilla planet - wo, 05/07/2017 - 23:31

Oops, I procrastinated forgot to post an update for 2012.3 and we are done with 2012.4 too now.

2012.3 sprint
  • Closed Stories: 26
  • Closed Points: 37 (3 aren't used in the velocity calculation as they were fixed by James and Kadir - Thanks!)
  • Developer Days: 28
  • Velocity: 1.21 pts/day

The 2012.3 sprint went very well. We accomplished most of the goals we set out to do. We rolled out Elastic Search to 50% of our users and had it going for several days. We fixed some of the blocker bugs and came up with a plan for reindexing without downtime. Everything was great until we decided to add some timers to the search view in order to compare times of the Elastic Search vs the Sphinx code path. As soon as we saw some data, we decided to shut down Elastic Search. Basically, the ES path was taking about 4X more time than the Sphinx path. Yikes! We got on that right away and started looking for improvements.

On the KPI Dashboard side, we landed 4 new charts as well as some other enhancements. The new charts show metrics for:

  • Search click-through rate
  • Number of active contributors to the English KB
  • Number of active contributors to the non-English KB
  • Number of active forum contributors

We did miss the goal of adding a chart for active Army of Awesome contributors, as it turned out to be more complicated than we initially thought. So that slipped to 2012.4.

2012.4 sprint
  • Closed Stories: 20
  • Closed Points: 24
  • Developer Days: 19
  • Velocity: 1.26 pts/day

The 2012.4 sprint was sad. It was the first sprint without ErikRose :-(. We initially planned to have TimW help us part time, but he ended up getting too busy with his other projects. We did miss some of our initial goals, but we did as good as we could.

The good news is that we improved the search performance with ES a bunch. It still isn't on par with Sphinx but it is good enough to where we went back to using it for 50% of the users. We have plans to make it faster, but for now it looks like the click-through rates on results are already higher than what we get with Sphinx. That makes us very happy :-D.

We added two new KPI dashboard charts: daily unique visitors and active Army of Awesome contributors. We also landed new themes for the new Aurora community discussion forums.

2012.5 sprint

This week we started working on the 2012.5 sprint. Our goals are:

  • Elastic Search: refactor search view to make it easier to do ES-specific changes.
  • Elastic Search: improve search view performance (get us closer to Sphinx).
  • Hide unanswered questions that are over 3 months old. They don't add any value, so there is no reason to show them to anybody or have them indexed by google and other search engines.
  • Branding and styling updates for Marketplace pages
  • KPI Dashboard: l10n chart
  • KPI Dashboard: Combine solved and responded charts

We are really hoping to be ready to start dialing up the Elastic Search flag to 100% by the time we are done with this sprint.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Ricky Rosario: SUMO Development: 2012.2 Update

Mozilla planet - wo, 05/07/2017 - 23:31

Yesterday we shipped the second half of the 2012.2 sprint. We ended up accomplishing most of our goals:

  • [Elastic Search] Perform full index in prod - DONE
  • [Elastic Search] Roll out to 15% of users - DONE
  • Add more metrics to KPI dashboard - INCOMPLETE (We landed 3 out of the 4 new graphs we wanted).

Not too bad. In addition to this, we made other nice improvements to the site:

Great progress for two weeks of work! Some data from the sprint:

  • Closed Stories: 30
  • Closed Points: 38
  • Developer Days: 35
  • Velocity: 1.08 pts/day
Onward to 2012.3

We are now a little over halfway into the 2012.3 sprint. Our goals are to roll out Elastic Search to 50% of users, be ready to roll out to 100% (fix all blockers) and add 5 new KPI metrics to the KPI dashboard. So far so good, although we keep finding new issues as we continue to roll out Elastic Search to more users. That deserves it's own blog post though.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Ricky Rosario: Joined the Mozilla Web Team

Mozilla planet - wo, 05/07/2017 - 23:31

After 3 great years at Razorfish, I decided to move on and joined Mozilla 2 weeks ago. I will be working remote, but I spent the first week in Mountain View doing new hire orientation, setting up my shiney new MBP i7, setting up development environments for zamboni (new addons site) and kitsune (new support site), and fixing some easy bugs to start getting familiar with the codebase.

So far, I am loving it. Some of my initial observations:

  • My coworkers are super smart and awesome.
  • The main communication channel is through IRC (even when people are sitting nearby in the office). This works out great for the remote peeps like myself.
  • We use git/github for the our branch -> work on bug/feature -> review -> commit workflow. I am loving the process and github helps a ton with their UI for commenting on code.
  • Continuous Integration is the nuts.
  • Automated functional testing ^^.
  • Writing open source software full-time, and getting paid? Unreal!

I am working on SUMO (support.mozilla.com). It is currently going through a rewrite from tiki wiki to django (kitsune project). Working full time with django is like a dream come true for me (a very nerdy dream :).

Anyway, it is very exciting to work for Mozilla serving over 400 million Firefox users. I am looking forward to this new chapter in my career!

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Ricky Rosario: dotjs: My first Firefox Add-on

Mozilla planet - wo, 05/07/2017 - 23:31

Inspired by defunkt's dotjs Chrome extension, I finally decided to play with the new add-on sdk to port the concept to Firefox. dotjs executes JavaScript files in ~/.js based on their filename and the domain of the site you are visitng. For example, if you navigate to http://www.twitter.com, dotjs will execute ~/.js/twitter.com.js. It also loads in jQuery so you can use jQuery with in your scripts even if the site doesn't use jQuery (it is loaded with .noConflict so it doesn't interfere with any existing jQuery on the page).

You can get the add-on for Firefox 4 on AMO and it doesn't require a browser restart (woot!). The code is on github. Feedback and patches welcome!

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Ricky Rosario: support.mozilla.org (SUMO) +dev in 2013

Mozilla planet - wo, 05/07/2017 - 23:31

This is my first and last blog post for 2013!

Whewww, 2013 has been another splendid year for SUMO and the SUMO/INPUT Engineering team. We did lose (and missed a ton) our manager, James Socol, early in the year and I took over the managerial duties for the team, but the core dev team stayed intact.

Some metrics

Here are some metrics about what our platform, team and community was up to in 2013:

  • Page views: 502,812,271
  • Visits: 255,122,331
  • Unique visits: 190,633,959
  • Questions asked: 33,482
  • Questions replied to: 31,746 (94.8%)
  • Questions solved: 9,048 (27%)
  • Replies to questions: 119,440
  • Support Forum contributors:
    1+ answers: 8,723
    2+ answers: 3,436
    3+ answers: 1,764
    5+ answers: 742
    10+ answers: 247
    25+ answers: 97
    50+ answers: 63
    100+ answers: 42
    250+ answers: 22
    500+ answers: 17
    1000+ answers: 11
    2500+ answers: 7
    5000+ answers: 3
    10000+ answers: 1 (20,057 answers by cor-el)
  • Army of Awesome tweets handled: 46,030
  • Army of Awesome contributors: 911
  • Knowledge Base (KB) Revisions: 16,561
    en-US KB Revisions: 2,975
    L10n KB Revisions: 13,586
  • Locales with activity: 55
  • en-US KB Contributors: 165
  • L10n KB Contributors: 607
  • KB Helpful votes: 4,214,528 (72.6%)
  • KB Unhelpful votes: 1,587,416 (27.4%)
More metrics

Willkg wrote a blog post with that contains a lot more metrics specific to our development (bugs filed, bugs resolved, commits, major projects, etc.). Go check it out!

I wanted to highlight a few things he mentioned:

In 2011, we had 19 people who contributed code changes.
In 2012, we had 23 people.
In 2013, we had 32 people.

YAY!

Like 2011 and 2012, we resolved more bugs than we created in 2013. That's three years in a row! I've never seen that happen on a project I work on.

WOOT!

Input also had a great year in 2013. Check out willkg's blog post about it.

Onward

2013 was a great year for the SUMO platform. We finetuned the KB information architecture work we began in 2012 and simplified all of the landing pages (home, product, topic). In 2014, I am hoping we can make the Support Forum as awesome as the KB is today.

In addition to making the KB awesomer... The Support Forums now support more locales than just English. We now send HTML and localized emails! We added Open Badges! We switched to YouTube for videos. We improved search for locales. We made deployments better. We implemented persona (not enabled yet). We implementated escalation of questions to the helpdesk. We added lots of new and improved dashboards and tools for contributors and community managers. At the same time, we made lots of backend and infrastructure improvements that make the site more stable and resilient and our code more awesome.

As a testament to the awesomeness of the platform, new products have come to us to be their support platform. We are now the support site for Webmaker and will be adding Open Badges and Thunderbird early in 2014.

Thanks to the amazing awesome splendid dev team, the SUMO staff and the community for an awesome 2013!

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Air Mozilla: Bugzilla Project Meeting, 05 Jul 2017

Mozilla planet - wo, 05/07/2017 - 22:00

Bugzilla Project Meeting The Bugzilla Project Developers meeting.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Kat Braybrooke: two new articles: making, hacking, technomyths + machine ghosts!

Mozilla planet - ti, 04/07/2017 - 17:41

I’m really excited to be able to share two new articles with you today about some of my recent research and practice exploring unexpected encounters between machines, hackers and makers that have just been published for the Digital Culture & Society Journal and Furtherfield.

shanzai hacking in china

The first is the 1st article I have ever published in a peer-reviewed academic journal (and a great one at that!) with the ever-inspiring Tim Jordan. It really felt like an honour to get a copy of the journal in the mail with my name inside it. Called “Genealogy, Culture and Technomyth: Decolonizing Western Information Technologies, from Open Source to the Maker Movement”, it explores a few key technomyths surrounding the hype around Western-based movements around information technologies, from maker cultures and hackspaces to Open Source to Web 2.0.

Using a materialist geneaological framework and applying it to non-Western case studies, from One Laptop Per Child in Peru to jugaad making in India to shanzai copyleft practices in China, we suggest that a heterogeneous set of essentially global cultural practices have been homogenized by the West. We identify three key aspects as constitutive to all three technomyths: technological determinism of information technologies, neoliberal capitalism and its “ideal future” subjectivities and the absence and/or invisibility of the non-Western.

An excerpt from the conclusion: “By looking closely at the maker movement as a technomyth through comparisons to other practices, and then comparing this analysis to the Open Source and Web 2.0 myths that came before it, we argue that not only do enthusiastic, zeitgeist-like proclamations about internet and information-based technologies exist (something often noted), but that these hypes take particular forms, framing societal possibilities through culturally-unique perspectives to innovation itself. Here it is important to underline that we are not arguing that nothing is new. Instead, in each of the technomyths we have explored, we have noted that there are specific technological origins, practices, economics and social interactions that are recognized – and many that are not. Our point here is that new technosocial practices are continually being channeled by influential technomyths that frame, direct and disseminate practices in their own mythical images.

We have also argued that jugaad, shanzai and OLPC-appropriation demonstrate what is neglected by the current dominant notion of the maker movement. The lack of communal, re-appropriated, necessity-based and non-Western uses of technology that we found were obstructed by maker movement progenitors has suggested three core constituents embedded within its claims: technological determinism, neoliberal capitalism and Western-centrism. Our analysis of two further technomyths, Open Source and Web 2.0, has confirmed these constituents as key.

A continued difficulty here is that our description has had to rely on the very broad categories of Western, neo-liberal and technologically determinist… but we do identify questions for future analysis. First, we have identified the ‘West’ as being formed not by a concrete conception… but by a relation to absence… the non-Western simply erased. This is something that juggad and other materialist practices fundamentally challenge, and it also suggests that attention should be paid to… future techno-subalterns. Second, we have seen a particular economic subjectivity presumed, one that prioritises the use of information technologies to act outside of state boundaries in the general pursuit of profit. This was most clear in Web 2.0, but is also present in other myths, and is again clearly challenged by more community-centred efforts such as OLPC reappropriation. Finally, we have seen how certain technologies are privileged as the drivers of technological determination. In all three Western technomyths, we find a fascination… with internet-technologies as determining social and cultural structures.”


To read the full article, for those with a general academic login, a PDF is now available [here]; for those with a Sussex login it’s available [here]; or please feel free to [email me] if you’d like a pre-publication copy. I’d love to hear your thoughts, rebuttals and opinions on it.

machine ghosts tour

The second article which I wrote for Furtherfield with the talented Emma O'Sullivan, is called “Hunting the Machine Ghosts of Brighton”, and outlines our experiences in organising my first-ever psychogeography tour as part of the excellent Haunted Random Forest Festival. On this tour, we unveiled machine entities hidden within seemingly idyllic urban landscapes across the city of Brighton, from peregrine falcon webcams to always-listening WiFi hotspots. We were joined by an eclectic group of inspiring local people from across the UK, who also joined us in facilitating nodes and building activities for the tour. It was a very inspiring (and radical!) way to explore a city through its machines, its algorithms and its forgotten ghosts - and it was certainly an experience I won’t forget.

I’d like to give a big thanks to the editors and peer reviewers at Digital Culture & Society and Furtherfield for their guidance, kindess and support in getting these writings out into the world. I look forward to the continued conversations yet to come from them, human-based, bot-based and otherwise! ;)

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Doug Belshaw: The Essential Elements of Digital Literacies (WCCE, July 2017)

Mozilla planet - ti, 04/07/2017 - 12:21

Dave Quinn got in touch with me to bemoan the fact that my recent presentations haven’t been recorded. As a result, I’ve pre-recorded the talk I’m giving at the World Conference on Computers in Education at Dublin Castle today.

Slides: Google / Slideshare
Audio: SoundCloud

Depending on your privacy settings, you should see the slides and audio embedded above. They’re also archived at archive.org.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Smokey Ardisson: Welcome, “The Month in WordPress”!

Mozilla planet - ti, 04/07/2017 - 07:59

I stumbled into the افكار و احلام dashboard today to make a new post, and I noticed a new item in the “WordPress News” feed: a monthly roundup of what’s going on in the WordPress project. The WordPress Blog has, for as long as I can recall, limited itself to posting about releases (new versions, betas, etc.) and the occasional other high-profile news item, so if the blog was your main ongoing point-of-contact with WordPress (as I suspect it is for most users, more-often-than-not including me), you didn’t learn much about what was happening or where the software was headed until a release featuring those changes landed in your lap. So this is a welcome change, a quick overview of big items and pointers to other things that may be of interest, but on a monthly basis to still keep the WordPress Blog low-volume (and thus low-annoyance).

It reminds me of the weekly-ish Camino updates begun (I think) in 2005 by Samuel Sidler (with assistance from Wevah), first on Camino Update and then later on his own blog, and later taken over by me when Sam got busy with other things (and it would surprise me if Sam’s fingerprints weren’t on this new WordPress monthly roundup in some way). Over the years, those updates filled an important communication need in the Camino Project. It’s important to make it easy for people interested in your software to see what you’re doing (or that you are still doing something!), especially when those tentpole events like releases have a relatively long duration between them, but to do so without either requiring those interested people to dig in to the daily activity of the project or overwhelming them with such details or project jargon. I feel like “The Month in WordPress: June 2017” strikes the right balance and hits the mark for WordPress, and I’m excited to keep reading the feature in the months to come.

So welcome to the web, “The Month in WordPress”! :)

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

This Week In Rust: This Week in Rust 189

Mozilla planet - ti, 04/07/2017 - 06:00

Hello and welcome to another issue of This Week in Rust! Rust is a systems language pursuing the trifecta: safety, concurrency, and speed. This is a weekly summary of its progress and community. Want something mentioned? Tweet us at @ThisWeekInRust or send us a pull request. Want to get involved? We love contributions.

This Week in Rust is openly developed on GitHub. If you find any errors in this week's issue, please submit a PR.

Updates from Rust Community News & Blog Posts Crate of the Week

This week's crate is cargo-make, a crate that helps you automate your build workflow beyond what cargo already offers. Thanks to Sagie Gur Ari for the suggestion!

Submit your suggestions and votes for next week!

Call for Participation

Always wanted to contribute to open-source projects but didn't know where to start? Every week we highlight some tasks from the Rust community for you to pick and get started!

Some of these tasks may also have mentors available, visit the task page for more information.

If you are a Rust project owner and are looking for contributors, please submit tasks here.

Updates from Rust Core

109 pull requests were merged in the last week

New Contributors
  • Lee Bousfield
  • Milton Mazzarri
Approved RFCs

Changes to Rust follow the Rust RFC (request for comments) process. These are the RFCs that were approved for implementation this week:

Final Comment Period

Every week the team announces the 'final comment period' for RFCs and key PRs which are reaching a decision. Express your opinions now. This week's FCPs are:

New RFCs Style RFCs

Style RFCs are part of the process for deciding on style guidelines for the Rust community and defaults for Rustfmt. The process is similar to the RFC process, but we try to reach rough consensus on issues (including a final comment period) before progressing to PRs. Just like the RFC process, all users are welcome to comment and submit RFCs. If you want to help decide what Rust code should look like, come get involved!

The RFC style is now the default style in Rustfmt - try it out and let us know what you think!

Issues in final comment period:

An interesting issue:

Good first issues:

We're happy to mentor these, please reach out to us in #rust-style if you'd like to get involved

Upcoming Events

If you are running a Rust event please add it to the calendar to get it mentioned here. Email the Rust Community Team for access.

Rust Jobs

Tweet us at @ThisWeekInRust to get your job offers listed here!

Quote of the Week

I have rewritten the code that was formerly in c

And which you probably had written very well

Forgive me it was unsafe

@horse_rust on Twitter.

Thanks to @balrogboogie for the suggestion.

Submit your quotes for next week!

This Week in Rust is edited by: nasa42, llogiq, and brson.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Selena Deckelmann: Runtime All-Hands June 2017 Summary

Mozilla planet - mo, 03/07/2017 - 22:24

All of Mozilla met in San Francisco last week for a work week. Unlike the last few All-Hands, we spent the week mostly informally and not in meetings — hacking in rooms together on near-term work.

The Runtime engineering team was focused on landing patches for Quantum Flow, Quantum DOM and Quantum Networking efforts. We had exciting changes related to Speedometer v2, both in improving how we measure and landing key patches. The Security Engineering team invited the Tor Project to join and deep dive into the Android version of the browser (based on Fennec, and called OrFox). The rest of the Runtime team was landing patches, reconnecting with colleagues across the org, and making exciting, measurable progress toward a great launch of Firefox 57.

I asked several team leads to send me their highlights from the week. I’ve summarized this below. If I missed something that was important to you, please get in touch.

Project Quantum highlights

“Watching my laptop race HTTP network queries against the disk cache and seeing that it was choosing the right transactions to have the network actually be faster.” -Patrick McManus

  • QF team fixed 26 Quantum Flow bugs since last Friday, June 23
  • Landed (preffed off, going to do a pref experiment for rollout) budget-based background tab throttling (meta bug)
  • Joel Maher and his “army of automation” has helped correct Speedometer reporting.
  • Got a bunch of people from different teams in a room and figured out the easiest/best architecture for supporting the moz-page-thumbs protocol in e10s (i.e. the protocol that supports everything you see when you open a new tab). Same, for nsITraceableListener support (which is must for 57: needed to support the NoScript addon).
  • Incremental table sweeping bug fixes landed that should reduce GC pause times.
  • Byte code cache landed and is on for 5% of Nightly population — this project was in progress for more than a year.
  • We now have a name for almost every runnable in Firefox.

Security/Privacy Highlights

“At Mozilla all hands this week. They are excited to work with us.” –Mike Perry, Tor Project

  • Tor Browser for Android was updated during the workweek to be based on Firefox 52 (from 45). The update is in QA now.
  • Patch written (and being rewritten) for constant blinding in the JIT.
  • A patch for integrating Tor into Focus was hacked up for discussion.
  • Got the TLS Canary (tool for testing changes to our crypto stack on Alexa-top-100 websites) running in TaskCluster.
  • Had first successful use of OneCRL administrative workflow

Other Runtime Highlights

“The culture of focusing on performance is in effect! Performance was a big part of every discussion and review.” -Andrew Overholt

  • “Making my first interoperable handshake and encrypted data for Mozilla’s IETF QUIC.” -Patrick McManus
  • JavaScript classes are done and fully optimized.
  • GeckoView example now being tested in automation.
  • Added security certificate information to GeckoView for use in PWA and Custom Tabs.
  • Taught a bunch of people how to profile at the two Quantum Flow profiler office hours sessions.

Thanks everyone for a productive week!

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Carsten Book: Sheriff Statistics for June 2017

Mozilla planet - mo, 03/07/2017 - 12:24

Hi,

Welcome to the Sheriff Statistics for June 2017 !

Also i would like to thank everyone for taking part in the Sheriff Survey – You can see the results here : https://blog.mozilla.org/tomcat/2017/06/23/sheriff-survey-results/ Now to the actual data for June! June 2017:

Autoland Tree:

Total Servo Sync Pushes: 254
Total Pushes: 1799
Total Number of commits 3711
Total number of commits without Servo 3445
Total Backouts: 167
Total of Multi-bug pushes 12
Total number of bugs changed 1702
Percentage of backout against bugs: 9.81198589894
Percentage of backouts: 9.28293496387
Percentage of backouts without Servo: 10.8090614887 (thats ~ +0,8 % higher rate compared to may)

Mozilla-inbound Total Servo Sync Pushes: 0
Total Pushes: 1117
Total Number of commits 3611
Total number of commits without Servo 3611
Total Backouts: 130
Total of Multi-bug pushes 159
Total number of bugs changed 1591
Percentage of backout against bugs: 8.17096165933
Percentage of backouts: 11.6383169203
Percentage of backouts without Servo: 11.6383169203 (~ +0,7 % higher rate compared to may)

So Sheriffs managed and monitored on the Integration Trees in May 2017 ~ 2900 pushes and 297 backouts.

Let us know when you have any Question or Feedback about Sheriffing.

Cheers and have a great July!,
-Tomcat

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla Addons Blog: July’s Featured Extensions

Mozilla planet - snein, 02/07/2017 - 02:30

Firefox Logo on blue background

Pick of the Month: Privacy Badger

by EFF Technologists
Protects you from spying ads and invisible trackers.

“Works without any problems, causes no site loading issues, and is more trustworthy than other, similar programs.”

Featured: AdBlock for Firefox

by AdBlock
Robust ad blocker that takes aim against all forms of ads—pop-ups, banners, pre-rolls, and more.

“Best ad blocker out there.”

Featured: Disconnect

by Disconnect
Another great privacy protecting extension, Disconnect blocks invisible trackers and helps speed up your Firefox experience.

“One of the most important browser add-ons out there. Thanks!”

Featured: Easy YouTube Video Downloader Express

by Dishita
Very simple to use YouTube downloader; and one of the few to offer 1080p full HD and 256kbps MP3 download capability.

“Brilliant for downloading MP3’s and MP4’s.”

Nominate your favorite add-ons

Featured add-ons are selected by a community board made up of add-on developers, users, and fans. Board members change every six months. Here’s further information on AMO’s featured content policies.

If you’d like to nominate an add-on for featuring, please send it to amo-featured [at] mozilla [dot] org for the board’s consideration. We welcome you to submit your own add-on!

The post July’s Featured Extensions appeared first on Mozilla Add-ons Blog.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

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