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Byron Jones: happy bmo push day!

wo, 20/08/2014 - 09:49

the following changes have been pushed to bugzilla.mozilla.org:

  • [1047405] Comment tagging GUI not fully localizable because of text in Javascript instead of template
  • [1048712] comment tagging suggestions always returns a single result
  • [1054795] remove ‘Bugzilla Data For Researchers’ link
  • [1050230] Use better icons for the guided bug entry product selection to differentiate Fx, Fx for Android and FxOS
  • [1022707] Duplicate review flags on attachments in Toolkit and Firefox for Metro
  • [1050628] flag state API doesn’t honour bug or attachment security
  • [1055945] splinter generates “Use of uninitialized value” warnings when dealing with public reviews on private attachments

discuss these changes on mozilla.tools.bmo.


Filed under: bmo, mozilla
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Benjamin Kerensa: Mozilla and Open Diversity Data

wo, 20/08/2014 - 07:28

8289329472 3e77686981 z 300x300 Mozilla and Open Diversity DataI have been aware of the Open Diversity Data project for awhile. It is the work of the wonderful members of Double Union and their community of awesome contributors. Recently, a Mozillian tweeted that Mozilla should release it’s Diversity Data. It is my understanding also that a discussion happened internally and for whatever reason a release of Mozilla’s diversity data did not entirely result although some numbers are available here.

Anyways, I’m now going to bring this suggestion up again and encourage that both Mozilla Corporation and Mozilla Foundation release individual diversity data reports in the form of some numbers, graphs and a blog post and perhaps a combined one of both orgs.

I would encourage other Mozillians to support the push for opening this data by sharing this blog post on the Social Media as an indicator of supporting Open Diversity Data publishing by Mozilla or by retweeting this.

I really think our Manifesto encourages us to support initiatives like this; specifically principle number two of our manifesto. If other companies (Kudos!) that are less transparent than Mozilla can do it then I think we have to do this.

Finally, I would like to encourage Mozilla to consider creating a position of VP of Diversity and Inclusion to oversee our various diversity and inclusion efforts and to help plan and create a vision for future efforts at Mozilla. Sure we have already people who kind of do this but it is not their full-time role.

Anyways that’s all I have on this…

kz7Tmst Mozilla and Open Diversity Data

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mike Shal: PGO Performance on SeaMicro Build Machines

wo, 20/08/2014 - 02:00
Let's take a look at why our SeaMicro (sm) build machines perform slower than our iX machines. In particular, the extra time it takes to do non-unified PGO Windows builds can cause timeouts in certain cases (on Aurora we have bug 1047621). Since this was a learning experience for me and I hit a few roadblocks along the way, I thought it might be useful to share the experience of debugging the issue. Read on for more details!
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla Release Management Team: Firefox 32 beta7 to beta8

wo, 20/08/2014 - 00:04

  • 20 changesets
  • 52 files changed
  • 363 insertions
  • 162 deletions

ExtensionOccurrences cpp17 js9 h9 ini2 xul1 xml1 xhtml1 webidl1 py1 mm1 css1

ModuleOccurrences content15 js8 browser8 netwerk3 toolkit2 testing2 dom2 modules1 mobile1 editor1 accessible1

List of changesets:

Ryan VanderMeulenBug 1023472 - Disable test_bug935876.html on Android for perma-failing when pushed to a different chunk; a=bustage - 1764a68fe1ae Ryan VanderMeulenBug 1054087 - Disable test_dom_input_event_on_htmleditor.html on Android 2.3 for perma-failing since the number of Android mochitest chunks was increased; a=bustage - ef94af3dd0ad Jon CoppeardBug 999158 - Keep a spare chunk around to mitigate GGC OOM crashes on tenuring. r=terrence, a=lmandel - 97fd0156fdc2 Ryan VanderMeulenBug 1026805 - Disable frequently-hanging mozapps tests on OSX. a=test-only - 76f7c4f771f5 Matthew NoorenbergheBug 1054411 - Cancel the HTTP requests in browser_keywordSearch.js to avoid making network contact. r=adw, a=test-only - 6dec02f8d0ea Florian QuèzeBug 1048375 - browser_aboutHome.js intermittently causes external requests to snippets.mozilla.com. r=gavin, a=test-only - 8e09aad61a79 Randell JesupBug 1054166: Mirror Add/RemoveListener in Add/RemoveDirectListener r=roc a=abillings - 6a2810252cf8 Simon MontaguBug 1037641 - Split SetDirectionFromChangedTextNode into TextNodeWillChangeDirection and TextNodeChangedDirection. r=ehsan, a=abillings - 9e94aa2f0ae7 Brian HackettBug 1053683 - Add overrecursion checks to FillInBMInfo. r=jandem, a=abillings - c6e134b4ed52 Ed LeeBug 1039881 - Use an empty directory tiles data source pref before uplift [r=adw r=bholley a=lmandel] - 6790f9333fec Wes JohnstonBug 910893 - Don't disable the try again button. r=margaret, r=benb, a=lmandel - 7bb962c117df Valentin GosuBug 1045886 - Remove Cache directory from Android profiles. r=michal, a=lmandel - 07eb5ce30325 Valentin GosuBug 1045886 - Increase assertion count in test_bug437844.xul. a=test-only - c444cb84a78b Jan de MooijBug 1054359 - Add is-object check to IonBuilder::makeCallHelper. r=efaust, a=lmandel - f5bfa8f3434c Jared WeinBug 1016434 - Backout Bug 759252 from Firefox 32 and Firefox 33 for causing blurry throbbers. a=lmandel - 3741e9a5c6ca Jean-Yves AvenardBug 1045591 - Fix media element's autoplay for audio-only stream. r=cpearce, a=lmandel - f595bdcdbd1e Alessio PlacitelliBug 1037214 - Throw OOM to the script instead of aborting in FragmentOrElement::GetTextContentInternal. r=bz, a=lmandel - 353ade05d903 Ed MorleyBug 1026987 - Give the MOZ_DISABLE_NONLOCAL_CONNECTIONS error a TBPL-parsable prefix. r=froydnj, a=NPOTB - 92aead6bd5fb Andrew McCreightBug 1039633 - Always try to set the ASan symbolizer in gtest runs. r=ted, a=test-only - e0e150f31ffe Tooru FujisawaBug 1053692 - Do not use optimized stub for spread call with many arguments. r=jandem, a=lmandel - 45953c4613d2

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Andrew Overholt: “Bootcamp” talks on Air Mozilla

di, 19/08/2014 - 21:30

Thanks to Jonathan Lin and Spencer Hui some of the talks that were presented at the recent “bootcamp” are appearing on Air Mozilla and more will do so as we get them ready. They’re all in Air Mozilla’s engineering channel: https://air.mozilla.org/channels/engineering/

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Gregory Szorc: Submit Feedback about Mercurial

di, 19/08/2014 - 20:30

Are you a Mozillian who uses Mercurial? Do you have a complaint, suggestion, observation, or any other type of feedback you'd like to give to the maintainers of Mercurial? Now's your chance.

There is a large gathering of Mercurial contributors next weekend in Munich. The topics list is already impressive. But Mozilla's delegation (Mike Hommey, Ben Kero, and myself) would love to advance Mozilla's concerns to the wider community.

To leave or vote for feedback, please visit https://hgfeedback.paas.allizom.org/e/august-2014-summit before August 29 so your voice may be heard.

I encourage you to leave feedback about any small, big or small, Mozilla-specific or not. Comparisons to Git, GitHub and other version control tools and services are also welcome.

If you have feedback that can't be captured in that moderator tool, please email me. gps@mozilla.com.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Jen Fong-Adwent: revisit.link

di, 19/08/2014 - 17:00
A little over 3 years ago, I was learning node and wanted to try a project with it.
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Michael Kaply: Webconverger

di, 19/08/2014 - 16:42

One of projects I've been working on is Webconverger. Webconverger is an open source Linux-based kiosk that uses a customized version of Firefox as the user interface.

Webconverger is a great choice if you are setting up a kiosk or digital signage. It can be quickly and easily deployed on any type of machine. It works especially well on legacy hardware because of its low resource requirements. It can even be installed onto a USB stick and simply plugged in to an existing machine.

The configuration for the kiosk is downloaded from a server allowing you to customize your kiosk remotely and it will pick up your latest changes. It has a full featured API that allows you to do things like customize the browser chrome or whitelist certain sites. Plus it even stays updated automatically if you choose by downloading the latest version in the background.

If you're looking for a kiosk or digital sign solution, I would definitely recommend checking it out. Go to Webconverger.com for more information or email sales@webconverger.com.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Will Kahn-Greene: Input status: August 19th, 2014

di, 19/08/2014 - 16:11
Development

High-level summary:

It's been a slower two weeks than normal, but we still accomplished some interesting things:

  • L Guruprasad finished cleaning up the Getting Started guide--that work helps all future contributors. He did a really great job with it. Thank you!
  • Landed a minor rewrite to rate-limiting/throttling.
  • Redid the Elasticsearch indexing admin page.
  • Fixed some Heartbeat-related things.

Landed and deployed:

  • cf2e0e2 [bug 948954] Redo index admin
  • f917d41 Update Getting Started guide to remove submodule init (L. Guruprasad)
  • 5eb6d6d Merge pull request #329 from lgp171188/peepify_submodule_not_required_docs
  • c168a5b Update peep from v1.2 to v1.3
  • adf7361 [bug 1045623] Overhaul rate limiting and update limits
  • 7647053 Fix response view
  • f867a2d Fix rulename
  • 8f0c36e [bug 1051214] Clean up DRF rate limiting code
  • 0f0b738 [bug 987209] Add django-waffle (v0.10)
  • b52362a Make peep script executable
  • 461c503 Improvie Heartbeat API docs
  • 8f0ccd3 [bug 1052460] Add heartbeat view
  • d1604f0 [bug 1052460] Add missing template

Landed, but not deployed:

  • ed2923f [bug 1015788] Cosmetic: flake8 fixes (analytics)
  • afdfc6a [bug 1015788] Cosmetic: flake8 fixes (base)
  • 05e0a33 [bug 1015788] Cosmetic: flake8 fixes (feedback)
  • 2d9bc26 [bug 1015788] Cosmetic: flake8 fixes (heartbeat)
  • dc6e990 Add anonymize script

Current head: dc6e990

Rough plan for the next two weeks
  1. Working on Dashboards-for-everyone bits. Documenting the GET API. Making it a bit more functional. Writing up some more examples. (https://wiki.mozilla.org/Firefox/Input/Dashboards_for_Everyone)
  2. Update Input to ElasticUtils v0.10 (bug 1055520)
  3. Land all the data retention policy work (bug 946456)
  4. Gradients (https://wiki.mozilla.org/Firefox/Input/Gradient_Sentiment)
  5. Product administration views (bug 965796)

Most of that is in some state of half-done, so we're going to spend the next couple of weeks focusing on finishing things.

What I need help with
  1. (django) Update to django-rest-framework 2.3.14 (bug 934979) -- I think this is straight-forward. We'll know if it isn't if the tests fail.
  2. (django, cookies, debugging) API response shouldn't create anoncsrf cookie (bug 910691) -- I have no idea what's going on here because I haven't looked into it much.
  3. (html) Fixing the date picker in Chrome (bug 1012965) -- The issue is identified. Someone just needs to do the fixing.

For details, see our GetInolved page:

https://wiki.mozilla.org/Webdev/GetInvolved/input.mozilla.org

If you're interested in helping, let me know! We hang out on #input on irc.mozilla.org and there's the input-dev mailing list.

Additional thoughts

We're in the process of doing a Personally Identifiable Information audit on Input, the systems it's running on and the processes that touch and move data around. This covers things like "what data are we storing?", "where is the data stored?", "who/what has access to that data?", "does that data get copied/moved anywhere?", "who/what has access to where the data gets copied/moved to?", etc.

I think we're doing pretty well. However, during the course of the audit, we identified a few things we should be doing better. Some of them already have bugs, one of them is being worked on already and the otehrs need to be written up.

Some time this week, I'll turn that into a project and write up missing bugs.

That's about it!

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Adam Lofting: Trendlines and Stacking Logs

di, 19/08/2014 - 13:49
TL;DR
  • Our MoFo dashboards now have trendlines based on known activity to date
  • The recent uptick in activity is partly new contributors, and partly new recognition of existing contributors (all of which is good, but some of which is misleading for the trendline in the short term)
  • Below is a rambling analogy for thinking about our contributor goals and how we answer the question ‘are we on track for 2014?’
  • + if you haven’t seen it, OpenMatt has crisply summarized a tonne of the data and insights that we’ve unpicked during Maker Party
Stacking Logs

I was stacking logs over the weekend, and wondering if I had enough for winter, when it struck me that this might be a useful analogy for a post I was planning to write. So bear with me, I hope this works…

To be clear, this is an analogy about predicting and planning, not a metaphor for contributors* :D

So the trendline looks good, but…

Screen Shot 2014-08-19 at 11.47.27

Trendlines can be misleading.

What if our task was gathering and splitting logs?

Vedstapel, Johannes Jansson (1)

We’re halfway through the year, and the log store is half full. The important questions is, ‘will it be full when the snow starts falling?

Well, it depends.

It depends how quickly we add new logs to the store, and it depends how many get used.

So let’s push this analogy a bit.

Firewood in the snow

Before this year, we had scattered stacks of logs here and there, in teams and projects. Some we knew about, some we didn’t. Some we thought were big stacks of logs but were actually stacked on top of something else.

Vedstapel, Johannes Jansson

Setting a target was like building a log store and deciding to fill it. We built ours to hold 10,000 logs. There was a bit of guesswork in that.

It took a while to gather up our existing logs (build our databases and counting tools). But the good news is, we had more logs than we thought.

Now we need to start finding and splitting more logs*.

Switching from analogy to reality for a minute…

This week we added trendlines to our dashboard. These are two linear regression lines. One based on all activity for the year to-date, and one based on the most recent 4 weeks. It gives a quick feedback mechanism on whether recent actions are helping us towards to our targets and whether we’re improving over the year to-date.

These are interesting, but can be misleading given our current working practices. The trendline implies some form of destiny. You do a load of work recruiting new contributors, see the trendline is on target, and relax. But relaxing isn’t an option because of the way we’re currently recruiting contributors.

Switching back to the analogy…

We’re mostly splitting logs by hand.

Špalek na štípání.jpg

Things happen because we go out and make them happen.

Hard work is the reason we have 1,800 Maker Party events on the map this year and we’re only half-way through the campaign.

There’s a lot to be said for this way of making things happen, and I think there’s enough time left in the year to fill the log store this way.

But this is not mathematical or automated, which makes trendlines based on this activity a bit misleading.

In this mode of working, the answer to ‘Are we on track for 2014?‘ is: ‘the log store will be filled… if we fill it‘.

Scaling

Holzspalter 2

As we move forward, and think about scale… say a hundred-thousand logs (or even better, a Million Mozillians). We need to think about log splitting machines (or ‘systems’).

Systems can be tested, tuned, modified and multiplied. In a world of ‘systems’ we can apply trendlines to our graphs that are much better predictors of future growth.

We should be experimenting with systems now (and we are a little bit). But we don’t yet know what the contributor growth system looks like that works as well as the analogous log splitting machines of the forestry industry. These are things to be invented, tested and iterated on, but I wouldn’t bet on them as the solution for 2014 as this could take a while to solve.

I should also state explicitly that systems are not necessarily software (or hardware). Technology is a relatively small part of the systems of movement building. For an interesting but time consuming distraction, this talk on Social Machines from last week’s Wikimania conference is worth a ponder:

Predicting 2014 today?

Even if you’re splitting logs by hand, you can schedule time to do it. Plan each month, check in on targets and spend more or less time as required to stay on track for the year.

This boils down to a planning exercise, with a little bit of guess work to get started.

In simple terms, you list all the things you plan to do this year that could recruit contributors, and how many contributors you think each will recruit. As you complete some of these activities you reflect on your predictions, and modify the plans and update estimates for the rest of the year.

Geoffrey has put together a training workshop for this, along with a spreadsheet structure to make this simple for teams to implement. It’s not scary, and it helps you get a grip on the future.

From there, we can start to feed our planned activity and forecast recruitment numbers into our dashboard as a trendline rather than relying solely on past activity.

The manual nature of the splitting-wood-like-activity means what we plan to do is a much more important predictor of the future than extrapolating what we have done in the past, and that changing the future is something you can go out and do.

*Contributors are not logs. Do not swing axes at them, and do not under any circumstances put them in your fireplace or wood burning stove.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Laurent Jouanneau: Release of SlimerJS 0.9.2

ma, 18/08/2014 - 22:24

Few days ago, I released a minor version of SlimerJS, my scriptable browser based on XulRunner: SlimerJS 0.9.2.

If you discover my project: this is a browser which is controlled by a script, not by a human. So it has no user interface. In fact this is a browser like PhantomJS, which proposes the same API as PhantomJS. But it is based on Gecko, not on Webkit. See my previous post about the start of the project.

This new version fixes some bugs and is now compatible with Gecko/Firefox/Xulrunner 31.

Next big work on SlimerJS:

  • fix last issues that prevent GhostDriver to work well with SlimerJS
  • support Marionette(https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Mozilla/QA/Marionette)
  • try to implement remote debugging, to allow to debug your script from Firefox Dev Tools
  • try to have a true headless browser (so to have a browser without visible windows)

Help is welcomed, See you on Github ;-)

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Christian Heilmann: Makethumbnails.com – drop images into the browser, get a zip of thumbnails

ma, 18/08/2014 - 20:53

About 2½ years ago I wrote a demo for Mozilla Hacks how to use Canvas to create thumbnails. Now I felt the itch to update this a bit and add more useful functionality. The result is:

http://makethumbnails.com

It is very easy to use: Drop images onto the square and the browser creates thumbnails for them and sends them to you as a zip.

homepage

Thumbnail settings page

You can set the size of the thumbnails, if you want them centered on a coloured background of your choice or cropped to their real size and you can set the quality. All of this has a live preview.

If you resize the browser to a very small size (or click the pin icon on the site and open a popup) you can use it as neat extra functionality for Finder:

resize to simple mode

All of your settings are stored locally, which means everything will be ready for you when you return.

As there is no server involved, you can also download the app and use it offline.

The source, of course, of course is available on GitHub.

To see it in action, you can also watch the a quick walkthrough of Makethumbnails on YouTube

Happy thumbing!

Chris

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Rizky Ariestiyansyah: Webmaker with SMK ITACO

ma, 18/08/2014 - 20:08

August 18, 2014 we will carry out the webmaker event we’ve scheduled previously, the event held at SMK ITACO Bekasi, this is a vocational school for children who are less economic conditions. We only...

The post Webmaker with SMK ITACO appeared first on oonlab.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Doug Belshaw: Facebook and Twitter: beyond the like/favorite binary?

ma, 18/08/2014 - 18:09

There’s been a couple of developments with the social networks Facebook and Twitter that fit together quite nicely this week. The first is the news that Facebook likes make a huge difference in terms of what you see while browsing your news feed:

Wired writer Mat Honan found out what happens when you like every single thing that shows up in your Facebook feed. The results were dramatic: Instead of his friends’ updates, he saw more and more updates from brands and publishers. And, based on what he had liked most recently, Facebook’s algorithm made striking judgements about his political leanings, giving him huge numbers extremely right-wing or extremely left-wing posts. What’s more, all that liking made Honan’s own posts show up far more in his friends’ feeds — distorting their view of the world, too.

But Medium writer Elan Morgan tried the opposite experiment: Not liking anything on Facebook. Instead of pressing like, she wrote a few thoughtful words whenever she felt the need to express appreciation: “What a gorgeous shock of hair” or “Remember how we hid from your grandmother in the gazebo and smoked cigarettes?” The result, as you might guess, is just the opposite of Honan’s experience: Brand messages dwindled away and Facebook became a more relaxed, conversational place for Morgan.

The second piece of news is that Twitter is experimenting with changes to the way that ‘Favorites’ work:

Favorites have also been pseudo-private; while you can view a list of favorited tweets from an account’s profile page or on a tweet’s detail page, typically only the “favoriter” and the “favoritee” ever know about it. If Twitter starts surfacing favorited tweets in timelines, they’ve suddenly become far more public. The change — and the backlash — is somewhat similar to Facebook’s attempts to share just about everything “friends” did with Open Graph.

[…]

For those who have used Twitter for years, the change is so shocking it can seem like the company is completely ignorant to how its customers use the service. But even seasoned Twitter veterans should admit that the service’s core functionality is fairly arcane — it’s far from accessible to new users, and that’s a problem for Twitter.

What I find interesting is that most sites allow you to ‘love’, ‘like’, ‘favourite’, ‘+1’ or otherwise show your appreciation towards content. You can do this with Mozilla Webmaker too, when browsing the gallery. The trouble is that this is extremely limiting when it comes to data mining. If it’s used in conjunction with an algorithm to serve up content (not currently the case with Webmaker) then it’s a fairly blunt instrument.

There are some sites that have attempted to go beyond this. I’m thinking specifically of Bit.ly for Feelings, which allows you to share content that you don’t agree with. But there’s not a lot of great examples.

The trouble is, I guess, is that human emotions are complex, changeable and along three-dimensional analogue spectrum. Digital technologies, on the other hand - and particularly like/favorite buttons - are binary.

Update: after posting this I found that Yahoo! are planning to scan photos you publish on Tumblr to gauge brand sentiment. I’m not sure if that’s better or worse, to be honest!

Questions? Comments? I’m @dajbelshaw on Twitter, or you can email me at doug@mozillafoundation.org

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Nigel Babu: Arrrgh! Tracebacks and Exceptions

ma, 18/08/2014 - 17:45

My colleague asked me to take a look at a logging issue on a server last week. He noticed that the error logs had way too little information about exceptions. In this particular instance, we had switched to Nginx + gunicorn instead of our usual Nginx + Apache + mod_wsgi (yeah, we’re weird). I took a quick look this morning and everything looked exactly like they should. I’ve read up more gunicorn docs today than I’ve ever done, I think.

Eventually, I asked my colleague Tryggvi for help. I needed a third person to tell me if I was making an obvious mistake. He asked me if I tried running gunicorn without supervisor, which I hadn’t. I tried that locally first, and it worked! I was all set to blame supervisor for my woes and tried it on production. Nope. No luck. As any good sysadmin would do, I checked if the versions matched and they did. CKAN itself has it’s dependencies frozen, this lead to more confusion in my brain. It didn’t make sense.

I started looking at the Exception in more detail, there was a note about email not working and the actual traceback. Well, since I didn’t actually have a mail server on my local machine, I commented those configs out, and now I just had the right Traceback. A few minutes later, it dawned on me. It’s a Pylons “feature”. The full traceback is printed to stdout if and only if there’s no email handling. Our default configs have an email configured and our servers have postfix installed on them and all the errors go to an email alias that’s way too noisy to be useful (Sentry. Soon). I went and commented out the relevant bits of configuration and voilà, it works!

Palm Face

Image source: Unknown, but provided by Tryggvi :)

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

J. Ryan Stinnett: WebIDE enabled in Nightly

ma, 18/08/2014 - 17:44

I am excited to announce that WebIDE is now enabled by default in Nightly (Firefox 34)! Everyone on the App Tools team has been working hard to polish this new tool that we originally announced back in June.

Features

While the previous App Manager tool was great, that tool's UX held us back when trying support more complex workflows. With the redesign into WebIDE, we've already been able to add:

  • Project Editing
    • Great for getting started without worrying about an external editor
  • Project Templates
    • Easy to focus on content from the start by using a template
  • Improved DevTools Toolbox integration
    • Many UX issues arose from the non-standard way that App Manager used the DevTools
  • Monitor
    • Live memory graphs help diagnose performance issues

Transition

All projects you may have created previously in the App Manager are also available in WebIDE.

While the App Manager is now hidden, it's accessible for now at about:app-manager. We do intend to remove it entirely in the future, so it's best to start using WebIDE today. If you find any issues, please file bugs!

What's Next

Looking ahead, we have many more exciting things planned for WebIDE, such as:

  • Command line integration
  • Improved support for app frameworks like Cordova
  • Validation that matches the Firefox Marketplace

If there are features you'd like to see added, file bugs or contact the team via various channels.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Gregory Szorc: Mercurial hooks move and testing Mercurial

ma, 18/08/2014 - 17:10

Mozilla has a number of source repositories under https://hg.mozilla.org/hgcustom/ that cumulatively define how version control works at Mozilla.

Back in February, I launched an effort to establish a unified Mercurial repository for all this code. That repository is version-control-tools and it has slowly grown.

The latest addition to this repository is the import of the hghooks repository. This now-defunct repository contained all the server-side Mercurial hooks that Mozilla has deployed on hg.mozilla.org.

Soon after that repository was imported into version-control-tools, we started executing the hooks tests as part of the existing test suite in version-control-tools. This means we get continuous integration, code coverage, and the ability to run tests against multiple versions of Mercurial (2.5.4 through 3.1) in one go.

This is new for Mozilla and is a big deal. For the first time, we have a somewhat robust testing environment for Mercurial that is testing things we run in production.

But we still have a long way to go. The ultimate goal is to get everything rolled into the version-control-tools repository and to write tests for everything people rely on. We also want the test environment to look as much like our production environment as possible. Once that's in place, most of the fear and uncertainty around upgrading or changing the server goes away. This will allow Mozilla to move faster and issues like our recent server problems can be diagnosed more quickly (Mercurial has added better logging in newer versions).

If you want to contribute to this effort, please write tests for behavior you rely on. We're now relying on Mercurial's test harness and test types rather than low-level unit tests. This means our tests are now running a Mercurial server and running actual Mercurial commands. The tests thus explicitly verify that client-seen behavior is exactly as you intend. For an example, see the WebIDL hook test.

So what are you waiting for? Find some gaps in code coverage and write some tests today!

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Matt Thompson: Webmaker: what is the latest data telling us?

ma, 18/08/2014 - 17:00

What are we learning? This post highlights new metrics and some early analysis from Adam, Amira, Geoff, Hannah and many others. The goal: turn our various sources of raw data into some high-level narrative headlines we can learn from.

Getting to 10K

Current contributor count: 5,529 (Aug 15)

  • Are we on track to hit 10K? No, not yet. The statistical increase we’re seeing is based on good work to record past contribution. But our current growth-rate isn’t enough.
  • Why is the 4-week trend-line up? Because of Maker Party + bulk capturing historical activity (especially Hive + MVP contribution badges).
  • What can we do to grow faster? Short term, we can focus on (amongst other things):

    • 1) Maker Party partners. Convert more partner commitments into action, through a streamlined on-boarding process.
    • 2) Webmaker users. Try to convert more users into contributors. Ask them to do something more directly.
    • 3) Training. Net Neutrality teach-ins, train the trainer events, MozCamps, etc.
      • + …what else?

Webmaker users

Highlights:

  • We now have about 120K Webmaker users. We’re seeing big recent increases, mostly thanks to the snippet.
  • About 2% of those users are currently contributors.
  • ~50% of users have published something.
    • Most of that publishing happens on the user’s first day. (Users who don’t make something on their first day tend not to make anything at all.)
    • There’s very little overlap between tools. Users tend to make with a single tool. (e.g., of the ~46K people who have made something, only 2K have made something with both Thimble and Popcorn.)
    • About 20% have opted in to receive email updates from us. (e.g., via BSD)

Owned media
  • Snippet
    • Our top snippet performer: “The Web is your playground! See what you can build with Mozilla Webmaker and our global Maker Party.” (+ animated pug icon)
      • CTR = 0.58%. (Other MP variations: 0.15% – 0.49%)
      • The icon and animation have a big influence on CTR. Fun icons and playfulness are the hook.
      • “Teach and learn” language generally performs as well as more playful language.

  • Landing pages
    • A “survey-based approach” is our top performer. Asking people *why* they’re interested in Webmaker. (vs straight email sign-up ask) (+4.7% conversion rate)
    • 80 / 20 split for learning vs. teaching. About 78% of survey respondents express interest in making / learning, with 22% wanting to teach / mentor.
  • Language focused on teaching, learning and education performs well.
    • e.g., “Welcome to Webmaker, Mozilla’s open source education project, where you can teach and learn the web through making.” (+17%)
    • vs. “We believe anyone can be a tinkerer, creator, builder of the Web. Including you.”

  • Mozilla.org referral traffic
    • “Webmaker” out-performs “Maker Party.” Our conversion rate dropped to half when we shifted from from “Learn the web” to “Join our Maker Party.”

“The further away we get from the Mozilla brand, the more work there is to get someone on board.” — Adam

Maker Party
  • 1,796 events currently entered (Aug 15)
    • That means we’ve already surpassed last year’s total! 1,694 total Maker Party events last year, vs. same number in our first month this year.
    • But: we’ll still need a big event push in second half to hit our contributor target.
  • Key takeaways:
    • Tracking partner activity. Automated tracking has been hard — we’re relying instead on one-to-one calls.
    • We’re gathering great data from those calls. e.g.,
      • Unreported success. Partners are participating in ways that aren’t showing up in our system. Manual badging is filling that gap.
      • Occasional confusion about the ask. Some think “Maker Party” is a “MozFest-level” commitment. They don’t realize the ask is simpler than that.
      • They need easier ways to get started. More simplification and hand-holding. Working on a simplified “Event Wizard” experience now.
      • Some partners see more value in Maker Party than others. Orgs with offerings similar to our own may perceive less value than those in adjacent spaces.
    • We haven’t cracked the earned media nut. Not much coverage. And little evidence of impact from the coverage we got.
    • We don’t have a good way for measuring participation from active Mozillians.
    • Second half. We should gear up for a second “back to school” wave to maximize contributors.

“There’s the ‘summer wave’ and ‘back to school’ waves. We need to have strategies and actions towards both.” –Hannah

Next steps

Short-term focus:

  • 1) Partner conversion. This is probably our best immediate strategy for boosting contribution. Ship a simplified on-ramp for Maker Party partners. A new “Event Wizard,” simple start-up events, and user success support.
  • 2) Convert Webmaker users to contributors. We’ve seen a *big* increase in user numbers. This opens an opportunity to focus on converting those users. Ask them to do something more directly. Try new low-bar CTAs, email optimization, re-activating dormant users, etc.
  • 3) Training. Train the trainer events, MozCamps, MozFest, etc.

Longer-term questions

  • Year-long engagement. How do we more evenly distribute event creation throughout the entire year?
  • Match-making. How do we identify the teachers? How do we connect those who want to learn with those who want to teach? What are the pathways for teachers / learners?
  • Impact. How many people are learning? How much are they learning? Should we make “number of people learning” Webmaker’s KPI in 2015?
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

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