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Air Mozilla: Mozilla Weekly Project Meeting, 10 Oct 2016

ma, 10/10/2016 - 20:00

Mozilla Weekly Project Meeting The Monday Project Meeting

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Andreas Tolfsen: geckodriver 0.11.1 released

ma, 10/10/2016 - 16:38

Earlier today we released geckodriver version 0.11.1. geckodriver is an HTTP proxy for using W3C WebDriver-compatible clients to interact with Gecko-based browsers.

The program provides the HTTP API described by the WebDriver protocol to communicate with Gecko browsers, such as Firefox. It translates calls into the Marionette automation protocol by acting as a proxy between the local- and remote ends.

Some highlighted changes include:

  • Commands for setting- and getting the window position
  • Extension commands for finding an element’s anonymous children
  • A moz:firefoxOptions dictionary, akin to chromeOptions, that lets you configure binary path, arguments, preferences, and log options
  • Better profile support for officially branded Firefox builds

You should consult the full changelog for the complete list of notable changes.

You can fetch the latest builds which for the first time include Linux- and Windows 32-bit.

One non-backwards incompatible change to note is that the firefox_binary firefox_args, and firefox_profile capabilities have all been removed in favour of the moz:firefoxOptions dictionary. Please consult the documentation on how to use it.

Sample usage:

{ "moz:firefoxOptions": { // select a custom firefox installation // and pass some arguments to it "binary": "/usr/local/firefox/firefox-bin", "args": ["--foo", "--bar"], // profile directory as a Base64 encoded string "profile": "…", // dictionary of preferences to set "prefs": { {"privacy.trackingprotection.enabled": true}, {"privacy.donottrackheader.enabled", true} }, // increase logging verbosity "log": { "level": "trace" } } }
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Wil Clouser: Test Pilot Q3 OKR Review

ma, 10/10/2016 - 09:00

For the third quarter of 2016 the Test Pilot team decided to try using the OKR method (an OKR overview) for our goal setting.

We all sat down in London and hashed out what direction we wanted to move in for Q3, what we thought we could do in that timeframe, prioritized the results and then I published the results on the wiki. If you're interested in what Test Pilot did in Q3 you should read that link because it has a bunch of comments in it.

I knew we deprioritized some of our goals mid-quarter, but I was surprised to see us come up with a pretty modest .61. My takeaways from my first time using the OKR method is:

  • Wording is really important. Even if you all agree on some words while sitting around a table, look them over again the next day because they might not make as much sense as you think.

  • Getting the goals for your quarter planned before the quarter starts is tops.

  • Having a public list of goals you can point people to is great for your team, other teams you work with, and anyone in the community interested in your project.

  • Estimates for how long things will take you is still a Really Hard Problem.

The feedback I've received about the OKR process we followed has been really positive and I expect to continue it in the future.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Robert O'Callahan: rr Paper: "Lightweight User-Space Record And Replay"

ma, 10/10/2016 - 03:02

Earlier this year we submitted the paper Lightweight User-Space Record And Replay to an academic conference. Reviews were all over the map, but ultimately the paper was rejected, mainly on the contention that most of the key techniques have (individually) been presented in other papers. Anyway, it's probably the best introduction to how rr works and how it performs that we currently have, so I want to make it available now in the hope that it's interesting to people.

Update The paper is now available on arXiv.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Jeff Walden: Quotes of the day

ma, 10/10/2016 - 02:54

Of all tyrannies, a tyranny sincerely exercised for the good of its victims may be the most oppressive. It would be better to live under robber barons than under omnipotent moral busybodies. The robber baron’s cruelty may sometimes sleep, his cupidity may at some point be satiated; but those who torment us for our own good will torment us without end for they do so with the approval of their own conscience…. To be ‘cured’ against one’s will and cured of states which we may not regard as disease is to be put on a level of those who have not yet reached the age of reason or those who never will; to be classed with infants, imbeciles, and domestic animals.

C. S. Lewis, The Humanitarian Theory of Punishment

Frequently a [proposition] will [present itself], so to speak, in sheep’s clothing: [its undesirable consequences are] not immediately evident, and must be discerned by a careful and perceptive analysis. But this wolf comes as a wolf.

Scalia, J. dissenting in Morrison v. Olson
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Cameron Kaiser: The Xserves still lurk

ma, 10/10/2016 - 02:38
Xserves, the last true Apple server systems, apparently still lurk in dark corners in data centres near you. But for me, the quintessential Apple server line will always be the Apple Network Servers.
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Cameron Kaiser: A Saturday mystery, or, locatedb considered harmful to old Macs

za, 08/10/2016 - 22:02
I've been waist-deep on AltiVec intrinsics for the last week converting some of those big inverse discrete cosine and Hadamard transforms for TenFourFox's vectorized PowerPC VP9 codec. The little ones cause a noticeable but minor improvement, but when I got the first large transform done there was a big jump in performance on this quad G5. Note that the G5, even though its vector unit is based on the 7400 and therefore weaker than the 7450's, likes long strings of sequential code it can reorder, which is essentially what that huge clot of vector intrinsics is, so I have not yet determined if I've just optimized it well for the G5 or it's generalizeable to the G4 too. My theory is that even though the improvement ratio is about the same (somewhere between 4:1 and 8:1 depending on how much data they swallow per cycle), these huge vectorized inverse transforms accelerate code that takes a lot of CPU time ordinarily, so it's a bigger absolute reduction. I'm going to work on a couple more this weekend and see if I can get even more money out of it. 720p playback is still out of the question even with the Quad at full tilt, but 360p windowed is pretty smooth and even 360p fullscreen (upscaled to 1080p) and 480p windowed can keep up, and it buffers a lot quicker.

The other thing I did was to eliminate some inefficiencies in the CoreGraphics glue we use for rendering pretty much everything (there is no Skia support on 10.4) except the residual Cairo backend that handles printing. In particular, I overhauled our blend and composite mode code so that it avoids a function call on every draw operation. This is a marginal speedup but it makes some types of complex animation much smoother.

Overall I'm pretty happy with this and no one has reported any issues with the little-endian typed array switchover, so I'll make a second beta release sometime next week hopefully. MSE will still be off by default in that build but unless I hear different or some critical showstopper crops up it will be switched on for the final public release.

When I sat down at my G5 this warm Southern California Saturday morning, however, I noticed that MenuMeters (a great tool to have if you don't already) showed the Quad was already rather occupied. This wasn't a new thing; I'd seen what I assumed was a stuck cron job or something for the last several Saturday mornings and killed it in the Activity Monitor. But this was the sixth week in a row it had happened and it looked like it had been running for over three hours wasting CPU time, so enough was enough.

The offending process was something running /usr/bin/find to find, well, everything (that wasn't in /tmp or /usr/tmp), essentially iterating over the whole damn filesystem. A couple of ps -wwjp (What Would Jesus Post?) later showed it was being kicked off as part of the update system for an old Unix dragon of yore, locate.

There are no less than three possible ways to find files from the command line in OS X macOS. One is the venerable find command, which is the slowest of the lot (it uses no cache) and the predicates can be somewhat confusing to novices, but is guaranteed to be up-to-date because it doesn't rely on a pre-existing database and will find nearly anything. The second is of course Spotlight, which is accessible from the Terminal using the mdfind command. There are man pages for both.

The third way is locate, which is easier than find and faster because it uses a database for quick lookups, but less comprehensive than Spotlight/mdfind because it only looks for filenames instead of within file content as well, and the updater has to run periodically to stay current. (There's a man page for it too.) It would seem that Spotlight could completely supersede locate, and Apple thinks so too, because it was turned into a launchd .plist in 10.6 (look at /System/Library/LaunchDaemons/ and disabled by default. That's not the case for 10.5 and previous, however, and I have so many files on my G5 by now that the runtime to update the locate database is now close to five hours -- on an SSD! And that's why it was still running when I sat down to do work after breakfast.

I don't use locate because Spotlight is more convenient and updates practically on demand instead of weekly. If you don't either, then niced or not it's wasted effort and you should disable it from running within your Mac's periodic weekly maintenance tasks. (Note: on 10.3 and earlier, since you don't have Spotlight, you may not want to do this unless locate's update process is tying up your machine also.) Here's how:

  • On 10.5, the weekly periodic script can be told specifically not to run locate.updatedb. Edit /etc/defaults/periodic.conf as root (such as sudo vi /etc/defaults/periodic.conf -- you did fix the sudo bug, right?) and set weekly_locate_enable to "NO".

  • On 10.4 and before (I checked this on my 10.2.8 strawberry iMac G3 as well, so I'm sure 10.3 is the same), the weekly script doesn't offer this option. However, it does check to see if locate.updatedb is executable before it runs it, so simply make it non-executable: sudo chmod -x /usr/libexec/locate.updatedb

Now for some 8-Bit Weapon ambient (de)programming with a much more sedate G5 into the rest of the weekend.
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Hub Figuière: Rust and Automake

za, 08/10/2016 - 04:01

But why automake? Cargo is nice.

Yes it is. But it is also limited to build the Rust crate. It does one thing, very well, and easily.

Although I'm writing a GNOME application and this needs more than building the code. So I decided I need to wrap the build process into automake.

Let's start with Autoconf for Rust Project. This post is a great introduction to solving the problem and give an actual example on doing it even though the author just uses autoconf. I need automake too, but this is a good start.

We'll basically write a and a in the top level Rust crate directory.

AC_INIT([gpsami], m4_esyscmd([grep ^version Cargo.toml | awk '{print $3}' | tr -d '"' | tr -d "\n"]), []) AM_INIT_AUTOMAKE([1.11 foreign no-dependencies no-dist-gzip dist-xz subdir-objects])

Let's init autoconf and automake. We use the options: foreign to not require all the GNU files, no-dependencies because we don't have dependency tracking done by make (cargo do that for us) and subdir-objects because we have one and don't want recursive mode.

The m4_esyscmd macro is a shell command to extract the version out of the Cargo.toml.

VERSION=$(grep ^version Cargo.toml | awk '{print $3}' | tr -d '"' | tr -d "\n")

This does the same as above, but put it into VERSION

This shell command was adapted from Autoconf for Rust Project but fixed as it was being greedy and also captured the "version" strings from the dependencies.

AC_CHECK_PROG(CARGO, [cargo], [yes], [no]) AS_IF(test x$CARGO = xno, AC_MSG_ERROR([cargo is required]) ) AC_CHECK_PROG(RUSTC, [rustc], [yes], [no]) AS_IF(test x$RUSTC = xno, AC_MSG_ERROR([rustc is required]) )

Check for cargo and rustc. I'm pretty sure without rustc you don't have cargo, but better be safe than sorry. Note that this is considered a fatal error at configure time.

dnl Release build we do. CARGO_TARGET_DIR=release AC_SUBST(CARGO_TARGET_DIR)

This is a trick: we need the cargo target directory. We hardcode to release as that's what we want to build.

The end is pretty much standard.

So far just a few tricks.

desktop_files = data/gpsami.desktop desktopdir = $(datadir)/applications desktop_DATA = $(desktop_files) ui_files = src/mgwindow.ui \ $(null)

Just some basic declarations in the The desktop file with installation target and the ui_files. Note that at the moment the ui files are not installed because we inline them in Rust.

EXTRA_DIST = Cargo.toml \ src/devices.json \ src/ \ src/ \ src/ \ src/ \ src/ \ src/ \ $(ui_files) \ $(desktop_in_files) \ $(null)

We want to distribute the source files and the desktop files. This will get more complex when the crate grows as we'll need to add more files to here.

all-local: cargo build --release clean-local: -cargo clean

Drive build and clean targets with cargo.

install-exec-local: $(MKDIR_P) $(DESTDIR)$(bindir) $(INSTALL) -c -m 755 target/@CARGO_TARGET_DIR@/gpsami $(DESTDIR)$(bindir)

We have to install the binary by hand. That's one of the drawback of cargo.

We this, we do

$ autoreconf -si $ ./configure $ make # make install

This build in release and install it in the prefix. You can even make dist, which is another of the reason why I wanted to do that.

Caveats: I know this will not work if we build in a different directory than the source directory. make distcheck fails for that reason.

I'm sure there are ways to improve this, and I will probably, but I wanted to give a recipe for something I wanted to do.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet