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Adam Lofting: Trendlines and Stacking Logs

di, 19/08/2014 - 13:49
TL;DR
  • Our MoFo dashboards now have trendlines based on known activity to date
  • The recent uptick in activity is partly new contributors, and partly new recognition of existing contributors (all of which is good, but some of which is misleading for the trendline in the short term)
  • Below is a rambling analogy for thinking about our contributor goals and how we answer the question ‘are we on track for 2014?’
  • + if you haven’t seen it, OpenMatt has crisply summarized a tonne of the data and insights that we’ve unpicked during Maker Party
Stacking Logs

I was stacking logs over the weekend, and wondering if I had enough for winter, when it struck me that this might be a useful analogy for a post I was planning to write. So bear with me, I hope this works…

To be clear, this is an analogy about predicting and planning, not a metaphor for contributors* :D

So the trendline looks good, but…

Screen Shot 2014-08-19 at 11.47.27

Trendlines can be misleading.

What if our task was gathering and splitting logs?

Vedstapel, Johannes Jansson (1)

We’re halfway through the year, and the log store is half full. The important questions is, ‘will it be full when the snow starts falling?

Well, it depends.

It depends how quickly we add new logs to the store, and it depends how many get used.

So let’s push this analogy a bit.

Firewood in the snow

Before this year, we had scattered stacks of logs here and there, in teams and projects. Some we knew about, some we didn’t. Some we thought were big stacks of logs but were actually stacked on top of something else.

Vedstapel, Johannes Jansson

Setting a target was like building a log store and deciding to fill it. We built ours to hold 10,000 logs. There was a bit of guesswork in that.

It took a while to gather up our existing logs (build our databases and counting tools). But the good news is, we had more logs than we thought.

Now we need to start finding and splitting more logs*.

Switching from analogy to reality for a minute…

This week we added trendlines to our dashboard. These are two linear regression lines. One based on all activity for the year to-date, and one based on the most recent 4 weeks. It gives a quick feedback mechanism on whether recent actions are helping us towards to our targets and whether we’re improving over the year to-date.

These are interesting, but can be misleading given our current working practices. The trendline implies some form of destiny. You do a load of work recruiting new contributors, see the trendline is on target, and relax. But relaxing isn’t an option because of the way we’re currently recruiting contributors.

Switching back to the analogy…

We’re mostly splitting logs by hand.

Špalek na štípání.jpg

Things happen because we go out and make them happen.

Hard work is the reason we have 1,800 Maker Party events on the map this year and we’re only half-way through the campaign.

There’s a lot to be said for this way of making things happen, and I think there’s enough time left in the year to fill the log store this way.

But this is not mathematical or automated, which makes trendlines based on this activity a bit misleading.

In this mode of working, the answer to ‘Are we on track for 2014?‘ is: ‘the log store will be filled… if we fill it‘.

Scaling

Holzspalter 2

As we move forward, and think about scale… say a hundred-thousand logs (or even better, a Million Mozillians). We need to think about log splitting machines (or ‘systems’).

Systems can be tested, tuned, modified and multiplied. In a world of ‘systems’ we can apply trendlines to our graphs that are much better predictors of future growth.

We should be experimenting with systems now (and we are a little bit). But we don’t yet know what the contributor growth system looks like that works as well as the analogous log splitting machines of the forestry industry. These are things to be invented, tested and iterated on, but I wouldn’t bet on them as the solution for 2014 as this could take a while to solve.

I should also state explicitly that systems are not necessarily software (or hardware). Technology is a relatively small part of the systems of movement building. For an interesting but time consuming distraction, this talk on Social Machines from last week’s Wikimania conference is worth a ponder:

Predicting 2014 today?

Even if you’re splitting logs by hand, you can schedule time to do it. Plan each month, check in on targets and spend more or less time as required to stay on track for the year.

This boils down to a planning exercise, with a little bit of guess work to get started.

In simple terms, you list all the things you plan to do this year that could recruit contributors, and how many contributors you think each will recruit. As you complete some of these activities you reflect on your predictions, and modify the plans and update estimates for the rest of the year.

Geoffrey has put together a training workshop for this, along with a spreadsheet structure to make this simple for teams to implement. It’s not scary, and it helps you get a grip on the future.

From there, we can start to feed our planned activity and forecast recruitment numbers into our dashboard as a trendline rather than relying solely on past activity.

The manual nature of the splitting-wood-like-activity means what we plan to do is a much more important predictor of the future than extrapolating what we have done in the past, and that changing the future is something you can go out and do.

*Contributors are not logs. Do not swing axes at them, and do not under any circumstances put them in your fireplace or wood burning stove.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Laurent Jouanneau: Release of SlimerJS 0.9.2

ma, 18/08/2014 - 22:24

Few days ago, I released a minor version of SlimerJS, my scriptable browser based on XulRunner: SlimerJS 0.9.2.

If you discover my project: this is a browser which is controlled by a script, not by a human. So it has no user interface. In fact this is a browser like PhantomJS, which proposes the same API as PhantomJS. But it is based on Gecko, not on Webkit. See my previous post about the start of the project.

This new version fixes some bugs and is now compatible with Gecko/Firefox/Xulrunner 31.

Next big work on SlimerJS:

  • fix last issues that prevent GhostDriver to work well with SlimerJS
  • support Marionette(https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Mozilla/QA/Marionette)
  • try to implement remote debugging, to allow to debug your script from Firefox Dev Tools
  • try to have a true headless browser (so to have a browser without visible windows)

Help is welcomed, See you on Github ;-)

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Christian Heilmann: Makethumbnails.com – drop images into the browser, get a zip of thumbnails

ma, 18/08/2014 - 20:53

About 2½ years ago I wrote a demo for Mozilla Hacks how to use Canvas to create thumbnails. Now I felt the itch to update this a bit and add more useful functionality. The result is:

http://makethumbnails.com

It is very easy to use: Drop images onto the square and the browser creates thumbnails for them and sends them to you as a zip.

homepage

Thumbnail settings page

You can set the size of the thumbnails, if you want them centered on a coloured background of your choice or cropped to their real size and you can set the quality. All of this has a live preview.

If you resize the browser to a very small size (or click the pin icon on the site and open a popup) you can use it as neat extra functionality for Finder:

resize to simple mode

All of your settings are stored locally, which means everything will be ready for you when you return.

As there is no server involved, you can also download the app and use it offline.

The source, of course, of course is available on GitHub.

To see it in action, you can also watch the a quick walkthrough of Makethumbnails on YouTube

Happy thumbing!

Chris

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Rizky Ariestiyansyah: Webmaker with SMK ITACO

ma, 18/08/2014 - 20:08

August 18, 2014 we will carry out the webmaker event we’ve scheduled previously, the event held at SMK ITACO Bekasi, this is a vocational school for children who are less economic conditions. We only...

The post Webmaker with SMK ITACO appeared first on oonlab.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Doug Belshaw: Facebook and Twitter: beyond the like/favorite binary?

ma, 18/08/2014 - 18:09

There’s been a couple of developments with the social networks Facebook and Twitter that fit together quite nicely this week. The first is the news that Facebook likes make a huge difference in terms of what you see while browsing your news feed:

Wired writer Mat Honan found out what happens when you like every single thing that shows up in your Facebook feed. The results were dramatic: Instead of his friends’ updates, he saw more and more updates from brands and publishers. And, based on what he had liked most recently, Facebook’s algorithm made striking judgements about his political leanings, giving him huge numbers extremely right-wing or extremely left-wing posts. What’s more, all that liking made Honan’s own posts show up far more in his friends’ feeds — distorting their view of the world, too.

But Medium writer Elan Morgan tried the opposite experiment: Not liking anything on Facebook. Instead of pressing like, she wrote a few thoughtful words whenever she felt the need to express appreciation: “What a gorgeous shock of hair” or “Remember how we hid from your grandmother in the gazebo and smoked cigarettes?” The result, as you might guess, is just the opposite of Honan’s experience: Brand messages dwindled away and Facebook became a more relaxed, conversational place for Morgan.

The second piece of news is that Twitter is experimenting with changes to the way that ‘Favorites’ work:

Favorites have also been pseudo-private; while you can view a list of favorited tweets from an account’s profile page or on a tweet’s detail page, typically only the “favoriter” and the “favoritee” ever know about it. If Twitter starts surfacing favorited tweets in timelines, they’ve suddenly become far more public. The change — and the backlash — is somewhat similar to Facebook’s attempts to share just about everything “friends” did with Open Graph.

[…]

For those who have used Twitter for years, the change is so shocking it can seem like the company is completely ignorant to how its customers use the service. But even seasoned Twitter veterans should admit that the service’s core functionality is fairly arcane — it’s far from accessible to new users, and that’s a problem for Twitter.

What I find interesting is that most sites allow you to ‘love’, ‘like’, ‘favourite’, ‘+1’ or otherwise show your appreciation towards content. You can do this with Mozilla Webmaker too, when browsing the gallery. The trouble is that this is extremely limiting when it comes to data mining. If it’s used in conjunction with an algorithm to serve up content (not currently the case with Webmaker) then it’s a fairly blunt instrument.

There are some sites that have attempted to go beyond this. I’m thinking specifically of Bit.ly for Feelings, which allows you to share content that you don’t agree with. But there’s not a lot of great examples.

The trouble is, I guess, is that human emotions are complex, changeable and along three-dimensional analogue spectrum. Digital technologies, on the other hand - and particularly like/favorite buttons - are binary.

Update: after posting this I found that Yahoo! are planning to scan photos you publish on Tumblr to gauge brand sentiment. I’m not sure if that’s better or worse, to be honest!

Questions? Comments? I’m @dajbelshaw on Twitter, or you can email me at doug@mozillafoundation.org

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Nigel Babu: Arrrgh! Tracebacks and Exceptions

ma, 18/08/2014 - 17:45

My colleague asked me to take a look at a logging issue on a server last week. He noticed that the error logs had way too little information about exceptions. In this particular instance, we had switched to Nginx + gunicorn instead of our usual Nginx + Apache + mod_wsgi (yeah, we’re weird). I took a quick look this morning and everything looked exactly like they should. I’ve read up more gunicorn docs today than I’ve ever done, I think.

Eventually, I asked my colleague Tryggvi for help. I needed a third person to tell me if I was making an obvious mistake. He asked me if I tried running gunicorn without supervisor, which I hadn’t. I tried that locally first, and it worked! I was all set to blame supervisor for my woes and tried it on production. Nope. No luck. As any good sysadmin would do, I checked if the versions matched and they did. CKAN itself has it’s dependencies frozen, this lead to more confusion in my brain. It didn’t make sense.

I started looking at the Exception in more detail, there was a note about email not working and the actual traceback. Well, since I didn’t actually have a mail server on my local machine, I commented those configs out, and now I just had the right Traceback. A few minutes later, it dawned on me. It’s a Pylons “feature”. The full traceback is printed to stdout if and only if there’s no email handling. Our default configs have an email configured and our servers have postfix installed on them and all the errors go to an email alias that’s way too noisy to be useful (Sentry. Soon). I went and commented out the relevant bits of configuration and voilà, it works!

Palm Face

Image source: Unknown, but provided by Tryggvi :)

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

J. Ryan Stinnett: WebIDE enabled in Nightly

ma, 18/08/2014 - 17:44

I am excited to announce that WebIDE is now enabled by default in Nightly (Firefox 34)! Everyone on the App Tools team has been working hard to polish this new tool that we originally announced back in June.

Features

While the previous App Manager tool was great, that tool's UX held us back when trying support more complex workflows. With the redesign into WebIDE, we've already been able to add:

  • Project Editing
    • Great for getting started without worrying about an external editor
  • Project Templates
    • Easy to focus on content from the start by using a template
  • Improved DevTools Toolbox integration
    • Many UX issues arose from the non-standard way that App Manager used the DevTools
  • Monitor
    • Live memory graphs help diagnose performance issues

Transition

All projects you may have created previously in the App Manager are also available in WebIDE.

While the App Manager is now hidden, it's accessible for now at about:app-manager. We do intend to remove it entirely in the future, so it's best to start using WebIDE today. If you find any issues, please file bugs!

What's Next

Looking ahead, we have many more exciting things planned for WebIDE, such as:

  • Command line integration
  • Improved support for app frameworks like Cordova
  • Validation that matches the Firefox Marketplace

If there are features you'd like to see added, file bugs or contact the team via various channels.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Gregory Szorc: Mercurial hooks move and testing Mercurial

ma, 18/08/2014 - 17:10

Mozilla has a number of source repositories under https://hg.mozilla.org/hgcustom/ that cumulatively define how version control works at Mozilla.

Back in February, I launched an effort to establish a unified Mercurial repository for all this code. That repository is version-control-tools and it has slowly grown.

The latest addition to this repository is the import of the hghooks repository. This now-defunct repository contained all the server-side Mercurial hooks that Mozilla has deployed on hg.mozilla.org.

Soon after that repository was imported into version-control-tools, we started executing the hooks tests as part of the existing test suite in version-control-tools. This means we get continuous integration, code coverage, and the ability to run tests against multiple versions of Mercurial (2.5.4 through 3.1) in one go.

This is new for Mozilla and is a big deal. For the first time, we have a somewhat robust testing environment for Mercurial that is testing things we run in production.

But we still have a long way to go. The ultimate goal is to get everything rolled into the version-control-tools repository and to write tests for everything people rely on. We also want the test environment to look as much like our production environment as possible. Once that's in place, most of the fear and uncertainty around upgrading or changing the server goes away. This will allow Mozilla to move faster and issues like our recent server problems can be diagnosed more quickly (Mercurial has added better logging in newer versions).

If you want to contribute to this effort, please write tests for behavior you rely on. We're now relying on Mercurial's test harness and test types rather than low-level unit tests. This means our tests are now running a Mercurial server and running actual Mercurial commands. The tests thus explicitly verify that client-seen behavior is exactly as you intend. For an example, see the WebIDL hook test.

So what are you waiting for? Find some gaps in code coverage and write some tests today!

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Matt Thompson: Webmaker: what is the latest data telling us?

ma, 18/08/2014 - 17:00

What are we learning? This post highlights new metrics and some early analysis from Adam, Amira, Geoff, Hannah and many others. The goal: turn our various sources of raw data into some high-level narrative headlines we can learn from.

Getting to 10K

Current contributor count: 5,529 (Aug 15)

  • Are we on track to hit 10K? No, not yet. The statistical increase we’re seeing is based on good work to record past contribution. But our current growth-rate isn’t enough.
  • Why is the 4-week trend-line up? Because of Maker Party + bulk capturing historical activity (especially Hive + MVP contribution badges).
  • What can we do to grow faster? Short term, we can focus on (amongst other things):

    • 1) Maker Party partners. Convert more partner commitments into action, through a streamlined on-boarding process.
    • 2) Webmaker users. Try to convert more users into contributors. Ask them to do something more directly.
    • 3) Training. Net Neutrality teach-ins, train the trainer events, MozCamps, etc.
      • + …what else?

Webmaker users

Highlights:

  • We now have about 120K Webmaker users. We’re seeing big recent increases, mostly thanks to the snippet.
  • About 2% of those users are currently contributors.
  • ~50% of users have published something.
    • Most of that publishing happens on the user’s first day. (Users who don’t make something on their first day tend not to make anything at all.)
    • There’s very little overlap between tools. Users tend to make with a single tool. (e.g., of the ~46K people who have made something, only 2K have made something with both Thimble and Popcorn.)
    • About 20% have opted in to receive email updates from us. (e.g., via BSD)

Owned media
  • Snippet
    • Our top snippet performer: “The Web is your playground! See what you can build with Mozilla Webmaker and our global Maker Party.” (+ animated pug icon)
      • CTR = 0.58%. (Other MP variations: 0.15% – 0.49%)
      • The icon and animation have a big influence on CTR. Fun icons and playfulness are the hook.
      • “Teach and learn” language generally performs as well as more playful language.

  • Landing pages
    • A “survey-based approach” is our top performer. Asking people *why* they’re interested in Webmaker. (vs straight email sign-up ask) (+4.7% conversion rate)
    • 80 / 20 split for learning vs. teaching. About 78% of survey respondents express interest in making / learning, with 22% wanting to teach / mentor.
  • Language focused on teaching, learning and education performs well.
    • e.g., “Welcome to Webmaker, Mozilla’s open source education project, where you can teach and learn the web through making.” (+17%)
    • vs. “We believe anyone can be a tinkerer, creator, builder of the Web. Including you.”

  • Mozilla.org referral traffic
    • “Webmaker” out-performs “Maker Party.” Our conversion rate dropped to half when we shifted from from “Learn the web” to “Join our Maker Party.”

“The further away we get from the Mozilla brand, the more work there is to get someone on board.” — Adam

Maker Party
  • 1,796 events currently entered (Aug 15)
    • That means we’ve already surpassed last year’s total! 1,694 total Maker Party events last year, vs. same number in our first month this year.
    • But: we’ll still need a big event push in second half to hit our contributor target.
  • Key takeaways:
    • Tracking partner activity. Automated tracking has been hard — we’re relying instead on one-to-one calls.
    • We’re gathering great data from those calls. e.g.,
      • Unreported success. Partners are participating in ways that aren’t showing up in our system. Manual badging is filling that gap.
      • Occasional confusion about the ask. Some think “Maker Party” is a “MozFest-level” commitment. They don’t realize the ask is simpler than that.
      • They need easier ways to get started. More simplification and hand-holding. Working on a simplified “Event Wizard” experience now.
      • Some partners see more value in Maker Party than others. Orgs with offerings similar to our own may perceive less value than those in adjacent spaces.
    • We haven’t cracked the earned media nut. Not much coverage. And little evidence of impact from the coverage we got.
    • We don’t have a good way for measuring participation from active Mozillians.
    • Second half. We should gear up for a second “back to school” wave to maximize contributors.

“There’s the ‘summer wave’ and ‘back to school’ waves. We need to have strategies and actions towards both.” –Hannah

Next steps

Short-term focus:

  • 1) Partner conversion. This is probably our best immediate strategy for boosting contribution. Ship a simplified on-ramp for Maker Party partners. A new “Event Wizard,” simple start-up events, and user success support.
  • 2) Convert Webmaker users to contributors. We’ve seen a *big* increase in user numbers. This opens an opportunity to focus on converting those users. Ask them to do something more directly. Try new low-bar CTAs, email optimization, re-activating dormant users, etc.
  • 3) Training. Train the trainer events, MozCamps, MozFest, etc.

Longer-term questions

  • Year-long engagement. How do we more evenly distribute event creation throughout the entire year?
  • Match-making. How do we identify the teachers? How do we connect those who want to learn with those who want to teach? What are the pathways for teachers / learners?
  • Impact. How many people are learning? How much are they learning? Should we make “number of people learning” Webmaker’s KPI in 2015?
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Jess Klein: Remix + Hack the Firefox Home page. No really, we want you to!

ma, 18/08/2014 - 15:28
If you are a Firefox desktop user, you may have seen the Firefox default home page. This page contains a default engine web search and quick links to downloads, bookmarks, history, add-ons, sync and settings. Additionally, if you happen to have had tabs open the last time you used the browser,  you can restore them from the home page.  We often share important news and updates underneath the search bar.
Screen Shot 2014-08-15 at 10.18.04 AM.png
This is what I currently see at the Firefox default home page. Animated gifs FTW.

THE OPPORTUNITYA few months back, Hive Labs, (a new project within the Hive Learning Networks designed to explore the question “how do we use design to transform edupunk ethics into great products?”), was approached by the Mozilla Foundation Engagement team to brainstorm how the space could be used in an innovative way to educate Firefox users about the Maker Party. Maker Party is Mozilla's global campaign to teach the web, uniting educators, organizations and enthusiastic web users with hands-on learning and making. While I have to admit, I have never really created something in the realm of owned media, I saw this as an interesting opportunity for Mozilla to show (vs. tell) what Maker Party is all about.  

THE CHALLENGE

The team (which included creative individuals from many different projects across the Mozilla Foundation and the Corporation) immediately identified the opportunity space and came up with a few project requirements:
  • use the space in an interactive way to introduce the website visitor to web literacy skills
  • acknowledge that the visitor may not have ever seen code before, and understand that we do not know what web literacy skills they are coming to this space with
  • create something playful


THE SOLUTION

While we tossed around a few different ideas, the solution that we came up with was to create a Webmaker Goggles - like experience that lets the visitor see under the hood of the webpage.

Screen Shot 2014-08-15 at 10.35.04 AM.png

After doing some initial sketches, we realized that we needed to define our learning objectives for the project.  While normally this is fairly easy to do - you say that the learner will come away with the ability to remix a paragraph written in HTML and understand what p tags are, or something very basic. Here, the challenge was two-fold: 1. the webpage visitor did not identify as a learner and 2. as I mentioned before, they might have no knowledge of the fact that the code is written in order to create a webpage. So, after several false starts, we came up with the the goal of having the website visitor walk away understanding that if you look under the hood of a webpage, you will see it is made from code.

Initial sketches for the snippet included replacing the Firefox logo with an image

After the learning objective was defined, we had to interpret what that meant in terms of interaction design. I believe that the most effective way to empower a user is to put the tools in their hands to allow them to directly address and grapple with the thing that they might learn by tinkering with it themselves. We tried out a few different iterations on this. Above is a sketch where the visitor might get instructed to remix the page from a video. The idea was to have a person in the video describe what to do, and then the learner would use the goggles to swap out the video for an image or video of their choosing. This idea was fun, and had a lot of potential community localization opportunities. However, there was a risk that the user would just not click on the video, and miss out on all the fun.

Ultimately, we ended up utilising what Atul Varma calls “cruise control” —that’s where we model the behavior in order to encourage the site visitor to try it out themselves. It looks like someone is typing out all of the words on the screen.  We decided to focus on revealing a little CSS, because you can use real words to represent colors and seeing those colors immediately can have a visceral impact on the site visitor. Here is a screencast of the interaction:


We’re really excited about this project, as it represents one of the first interactive uses (if not THE first) of the space of the Firefox home page. We hope that as site visitors dip their toes into understanding the craft of the Web, they’ll be inspired to learn more through Webmaker and Maker Party.  Our ultimate goal is for people to feel empowered to become creators, not just consumers, of the Web.
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Jordan Lund: This week in Releng - Aug 11th 2014

ma, 18/08/2014 - 08:38

Completed work (resolution is 'FIXED'):


In progress work (unresolved and not assigned to nobody):

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Alex Gibson: Animating the Firefox desktop pages using CSS and SVG

ma, 18/08/2014 - 01:00

I recently co-authored a post over on the Mozilla Web Development blog! It's a technical run through of how we did some of the CSS and SVG animations on the new Firefox desktop web pages over on mozilla.org. If that's your sort of thing, you can read the full article here.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Nigel Babu: The story of hgstats

zo, 17/08/2014 - 18:00

tl;dr: I built a thing to see public graphs of hg.mozilla.org called hgstats.

Lately, we’ve had problems with Mercurial at Mozilla. The Developer Services Team added a bunch of instrumentation to the hg webheads to help us track what is going wrong and when, to give us somewhat an early indicator of when things get shot to hell. All of these are on the Mozilla Graphite instance which are behind employee-only LDAP. However, an interesting quirk is that the image rendering is actually available without authentication. As a community Sheriff, I’ve been keeping close watch on hg throughout my shift with images that releng folks or hwine gave me. This gave an indicator of when to close trees so that we don’t end up having everything turn red. On Thursday evening, I was watching the conversation in #vcs on irc.mozilla.org, when bkero mentioned he’d made a dashboard in graphite. It suddenly dawned on me that I could just embed those images onto a page and quickly have a public dashboard!

Armed with a bunch of images from Ben, I created a github pages repo with a lovely theme that’s available by default. I embedded the images onto a static HTML page and suddenly, we had a minimal dashboard. It wouldn’t auto-refresh or let you alter the duration of the graph, but hey, now we had one place for things! This first step took about 15 minutes.

There were two features I had in my mind as must-haves: a) the page must let me change the hours of the graphs (i.e. last 2 hours, last 4 hours, last 8 hours, etc), and b) it should auto-refresh. I’ve looked at backbone several times in the past and I figured this was a good time as any to get cracking on building a backbone.js app.

I started slowly, the first step was, get everything I have right now, rendered with backbone. I spent a lot of frustrating hours trying to get it to work, but couldn’t because of silly mistakes. I haven’t been coding in JS much and it shows :) I think I stayed up until 2 am trying to diagnose it, but I couldn’t. When I woke up in the morning, I spotted the trouble immediately and it was a tiny typo. Instead of <%=, I typed <%$. After that first step, I got the router bit working and I had an app that could dynamically change the range of hours in the graph! I’d met my first goal!

I talked to mdoglio who took a quick look at the code and thought models might be a good idea if I’m dealing with data. I refactored the code again to use models, which cleaned it up quite well! Overnight, I had a pull request from hwine to add another graph as well, which I also made more dynamic.

The hardest bit was getting auto-refresh working. I couldn’t figure out an easy way to solve the problem. Eventually, I ended up with setTimer, but the full credit for the right incandation goes to bwinton.

High Five!

Working with backbone has been great, but I wish the documentation did more than just tell me what each function did. Python’s documentation often gives you more than function’s description, it tells you how you would use it practically. Of course, there quite a few resources that already fill this gap. I found backbonetutorials.com pretty useful. I got most of the basic idea of backbone from the site.

I also submitted it to Webdev Beer and Tell (my first submission!). Mike kindly presented it for me (no, he’s not the real nigelb!) and you can watch the video on Air Mozilla if you have some free time :) I would totally recommend watching the whole video, but if you don’t have a lot of time, skip to 6:37.

This is the first time I’ve built a single-page app, so I’d love feedback (extra points if you can do a code review). The code is on GitHub.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Hannah Kane: Maker Party Engagement Week 5

zo, 17/08/2014 - 17:37

Week 5!

tl;dr highlights of the week:

  • Though we saw significant jumps in Wm accounts and events, our Contributor numbers did not increase accordingly
  • We’re identifying many opportunities from the partner calls
  • Hack the Snippet is coming soon, along with the next iteration of the snippet funnel
  • The TweetChat created a temporary increase in Twitter engagement, but took attention away from press

Overall stats:

  • Contributors: 5552 (2% increase from last week’s 5441)
  • Webmaker accounts: 124K (17% increase from last week’s 106.3K)
  • Events: 1799 (crazy 50% jump from last week’s 1199)
  • Hosts: 493 (10% increase from last week’s 450)
  • Expected attendees: 76,200  (23% increase from 61,910)
  • Cities: 362 (40% increase from 260 – what caused this jump?)
  • Traffic: here’s the last three weeks. We continue to see the major boost from the snippet.

  • And the Webmaker user account conversion rate increased a bit further:

——————————————————————–

Engagement Strategy #1: PARTNER OUTREACH

We are learning a lot from the partner calls. Here are some of the most salient takeaways (borrowing from Amira and Melissa’s notes during Friday’s call):

Partner trends
  • Partners see value in badging their event mentors, speakers and volunteers as a form of appreciation. But there is a potential for those who receive the badges to have no idea who is badging them or what it means (lack of connection to MP). Opportunity: We need to better explain to people why they’ve received a badge and why they might want to create a Webmaker account.
  • Partners are doing things but we just haven’t captured them.  Opportunity: We need to offer real value to users in order to increase the amount of sharing/broadcasting/badging that happens through the site. 
  • Some people need way more training — Opportunity: this is where the event wizard might play a role; there also might be an opportunity to run TTT within certain orgs and spaces.
  • We need to clarify our value statement for partners. It may not be in  adding numbers to their events or traction to their programs/site, or getting press for non-Hive partners. Instead it may be in providing resources and curriculum. We can better segment partners into affinity groups (e.g. afterschool programs) and provide content, trainings, resources, CTAs specifically for them.  We can also localize those offerings to reduce hand-holding.
  • People don’t understand how broad our definition of Maker Party is: everyday events, small events, stands/booths/tables within other events — have to push them to realize that and include all of these on the events platform (note from HK: I would argue we have to offer them a reason to)
  • Opportunity: There’s the summer wave and back to school waves. We need to have strategies and actions towards both.
  • Challenges:
    • Age and time continue to be a blocker for new Wm accounts.
    • Mass emails to order swag, upload events, share information just didn’t work. They need 1-to-1.
    • We lost interest by a lot of people along the way. There’s a good 20-30% we will not be able to bring back in.
    • Parties sound like fun kid-like things (making toys etc.)
    • Getting the Maker Party logo/brand included in event promotion in a meaningful way is not happening, and the meaning behind the brand seems to cause confusion in some cases.

PROMOTIONAL PARTNERS: We continue to see only a tiny amount of referrals from promotional partner urls with RIDs.

——————————————————————–

Engagement Strategy #2: ACTIVE MOZILLIANS

Haven’t heard anything this week, but Amira and I are meeting with the FSA Community Manager on Monday of this week.

——————————————————————–

Engagement Strategy #3: OWNED MEDIA

Snippet Funnel:

The snippet funnel continues to perform well in terms of driving traffic. We’re aiming to beat a baseline 1.8% conversion rate.

We were a bit blocked by technical issues this week and weren’t able to release the new tailored account signup pages, but we continue to work on that.

The “hack the snippet” test was delayed, but will be live soon. We have a comms strategy around it (for after it’s been tested).

——————————————————————–

Engagement Strategy #4: EARNED MEDIA

Press this week:

Aside from a cross-post of last week’s Washington Post Magazine story (http://www.tampabay.com/news/business/workinglife/want-a-tech-job-what-to-study-in-a-fast-moving-field/2193050), we didn’t see press this week. We were focused on our Net Neutrality tweetchat instead.

SOCIAL (not one of our key strategies):

As expected, the Tweetchat temporarily increased our Twitter engagement for a two-day period—we saw double the usual amount of favorites, retweets, and replies. You can view the Storify here: https://storify.com/mozilla/net-neutrality-tweet-chat-from-mozilla-s-teaminter

The #MakerParty trendline for this week is back up to where it had been two weeks ago: 

See #MakerParty tweets here: https://twitter.com/search?q=%23makerparty


Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Nigel Babu: OKFestival Fringe Events

zo, 17/08/2014 - 17:00

The writeup of the OKFestival is very incomplete, because I haven’t mentioned the fringe events! I attended two fringe events and they both were very good.

First, I attended CKANCon right before OKFestival. It was informal and co-located with CSVConf. My best takeaway has been talking to people from the wider community around CKAN. I often feel blind-sided because we don’t have a good view of CKAN. I want to know how a user of a portal built on CKAN feels about the UX. After all, the actual users of open data portals are citizens who get data that they can do awesome things with. I had a good conversation with folks from DKAN about their work and I’ve been thinking about how we can make that better.

I finally met Max! (And I was disappointed he didn’t have a meatspace sticker :P

The other event I attended was Write the Docs. Ali and Florian came to Berlin to attend the event. It was total surprise running into them at the Mozilla Berlin office. The discussions at the event were spectacular. The talks by by Paul Adams and Jessica Rose were great and a huge learning experience. I missed parts of oncletom’s talk, but the bit I did catch sounded very different to my normal view of documentation.

We had a few discussions around localization and QA of docs which were pretty eye opening. At one of the sessions, Paul, Ali, Fabian and I discussed rules of documentation, which turned out pretty good! It was an exercise in patience narrowing them down!

I was nearly exhausted and unable to think clearly by the time Write the Docs started, but managed to face through it! Huge thanks to (among others ) Mikey and Kristof for organizing the event!

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Francesca Ciceri: Adventures in Mozillaland #4

zo, 17/08/2014 - 11:36

Yet another update from my internship at Mozilla, as part of the OPW.

An online triage workshop

One of the most interesting thing I've done during the last weeks has been to held an online Bug Triage Workshop on the #testday channel at irc.mozilla.org.
That was a first time for me: I had been a moderator for a series of training sessions on IRC organized by Debian Women, but never a "speaker".
The experience turned out to be a good one: creating the material for the workshop had me basically summarize (not too much, I'm way too verbose!) all what I've learned in this past months about triaging in Mozilla, and speaking of it on IRC was a sort of challenge to my usual shyness.

And I was so very lucky that a participant was able to reproduce the bug I picked as example, thus confirming it! How cool is that? ;)

The workshop was about the very basics of triaging for Firefox, and we mostly focused on a simplified lifecycle of bugs, a guided tour of bugzilla (including the quicksearch and the advanced one, the list view, the individual bug view) and an explanation of the workflow of the triager. I still have my notes, and I plan to upload them to the wiki, sooner or later.

I'm pretty satisfied of the outcome: the only regret is that the promoting wasn't enough, so we have few participants.
Will try to promote it better next time! :)

about:crashes

Another thing that had me quite busy in the last weeks was to learn more about crashes and stability in general.
If you are unfortunate enough to experience a crash with Firefox, you're probably familiar with the Mozilla Crash Reporter dialog box asking you to submit the crash report.

But how does it works?

From the client-side, Mozilla uses Breakpad as set of libraries for crash reporting. The Mozilla specific implementation adds to that a crash-reporting UI, a server to collect and process crash reported data (and particularly to convert raw dumps into readable stack traces) and a web interface, Socorro to view and parse crash reports.

Curious about your crashes? The about:crashes page will show you a list of the submitted and unsubmitted crash reports. (And by the way, try to type about:about in the location bar, to find all the super-secret about pages!)

For the submitted ones clicking on the CrashID will take you to the crash report on crash-stats, the website where the reports are stored and analyzed. The individual crash report page on crash-stats is awesome: it shows you the reported bug numbers if any bug summaries match the crash signature, as well as many other information. If crash-stats does not show a bug number, you really should file one!

The CrashKill team works on these reports tracking the general stability of the various channels, triaging the top crashes, ensuring that the crash bugs have enough information and are reproducible and actionable by the devs.
The crash-stats site is a mine of information: take a look at the Top Crashes for Firefox 34.0a1.
If you click on a individual crash, you will see lots of details about it: just on the first tab ("Signature Summary") you can find a breakdown of the crashes by OS, by graphic vendors or chips or even by uptime range.
A very useful one is the number of crashes per install, so that you know how widespread is the crashing for that particular signature. You can also check the comments the users have submitted with the crash report, on the "Comments" tab.

One and Done tasks review

Last week I helped the awesome group of One and Done developers, doing some reviewing of the tasks pages.

One and Done is a brilliant idea to help people contribute to the QA Mozilla teams.
It's a website proposing the user a series of tasks of different difficulty and on different topics to contribute to Mozilla. Each task is self-contained and can last few minutes or be a bit more challenging. The team has worked hard on developing it and they have definitely done an awesome job! :)

I'm not a coding person, so I just know that they're using Django for it, but if you are interested in all the dirty details take a look at the project repository. My job has been only to check all the existent tasks and verify that the description and instruction are correct, that the task is properly tagged and so on. My impression is that this an awesome tool, well written and well thought with a lot of potential for helping people in their first steps into Mozilla. Something that other projects should definitely imitate (cough Debian cough).

What's next?

Next week I'll be back on working on bugs. I kind of love bugs, I have to admit it. And not squashing them: not being a coder make me less of a violent person toward digital insects. Herding them is enough for me. I'm feeling extremely non-violent toward bugs.

I'll try to help Liz with the Test Plan for Firefox 34, on the triaging/verifying bugs part.
I'll also try to triage/reproduce some accessibility bugs (thanks Mario for the suggestion!).

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Planet Mozilla Interns: Willie Cheong: Shutdown: 4A study term

zo, 17/08/2014 - 07:46

This term has been very unfruitful. I picked up League of Legends after an abstinence streak from DotA that lasted 4 good years. This kinda makes me sad. I’ve also lost a lot of motivation, especially with books and academia. It really isn’t the gaming that’s causing this. It is more just a lack of willpower to carry on doing something that seems so pointless. There’s a whole new post graduation world out there, with new and relevant things to learn.

I’ve really taken a liking to software development. It’s funny because in first year I remember believing that I could never picture myself sitting in front of a computer all day typing away. Yet here I am now, not knowing what else I would rather be doing.

I also remember having long-term plans for myself to run a self-grown start-up right after graduation. It’s not that I haven’t been trying. I have been working hard on these things over the past years but nothing seems to have gained any valuable traction at all. With only 8 months left to graduation, this once long-term goal and deadline is suddenly approaching and hitting the reality of being unattainable. Such a realization kills the motivation to carry on pushing.

Visions of life after university used to be so bright and optimistic. But as the moment slowly approaches I realize how clueless I really am and that’s OK. Engineers are trained problem solvers; we figure things out, eventually.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Raniere Silva: Mathml August Meeting

zo, 17/08/2014 - 05:00
Mathml August Meeting

This is a report about the Mozilla MathML August IRC Meeting (see the announcement here). The topics of the meeting can be found in this PAD (local copy of the PAD) and the IRC log (local copy of the IRC log) is also available.

In the last 4 weeks the MathML team closed 5 bugs, worked in other 6 and open one bug. This are only the ones tracked by Bugzilla.

The next meeting will be in September 11th at 8pm UTC. Please add topics in the PAD.

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Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Raniere Silva: GSoC: Pencil Down (August 11 - August 17)

zo, 17/08/2014 - 05:00
GSoC: Pencil Down (August 11 - August 17)

This is the last report about my GSoC project and cover the thirteenth week of “Students coding”.

At this last week I worked at the auto capitalization and deployed a land page for the project: http://r-gaia-cs.github.io/gsoc2014/.

Bellow you will find more details about the past week and some thoughts about the project as a hole.

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Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla Release Management Team: Firefox 32 beta6 to beta7

zo, 17/08/2014 - 00:44

  • 7 changesets
  • 19 files changed
  • 104 insertions
  • 22 deletions

ExtensionOccurrences js6 txt4 cpp3 xml1 h1 css1

ModuleOccurrences js7 content7 mobile1 browser1

List of changesets:

Randell JesupBug 1013007: re-enable STUN throttling in mid-beta and later r=bwc a=lmandel - b42bbb72b7a8 Benoit JacobBug 777574 - Skip all quickCheckAPI tests on linux/android/emulator slaves. r=kamidphish, a=test-only - 791e4db4574b Alexander SeleznevBug 1038607 - Fix text color in search field on about:newtab page. r=dao, a=lmandel - 6fd1ba78d246 Margaret LeibovicBug 1048941 - Make all empty view images 90x90dp. r=lucasr, a=lmandel - 511ac00e4e6c Timothy NikkelBug 1027741 - Run decode complete notification handler for image documents on a script runner because they trigger invalidation and decode complete notifications are often dispatched during painting. r=smaug, a=lmandel - d4e47ec57f06 Axel VialaBug 1044584 - Fix incorrect computation of mUploadTransferred. r=bz, a=lmandel - cfec8a16880a Luke WagnerBug 992461 - Turn off the shell's asm.js cache by default. r=bbouvier, a=sledru - 51f60a862089

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

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