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David Camp: Doubt

vr, 04/04/2014 - 20:26

If you tried, I don’t think you could engineer a situation that could throw the Mozilla community so thoroughly off-center. A lot of folks at Mozilla work here because we want to do what’s right. Doing the right thing can be hard, but overall we’re comfortable with taking on hardship to do the right thing.

Now a lot of us are having a hard time figuring out what right means here. We’d love a common cause to fight for. This situation is thoroughly grey.

It hurts to see your friends and community attacked. It hurts more when you agree with the premise. We’ve seen people we respect simplified beyond their humanity by other people we respect. And we lost people that were really important to our cause.

Some are doubting their place in the community, some are doubting our leadership, some are doubting their own reaction to the situation. Did I give enough support to the people that needed it? Did the support I did give hurt someone else that needed it? Doubt is good, but it can be tough.

If you have clarity in this situation, please understand that a lot of us don’t. There are axioms floating around: “Bigotry must be shunned.” “Tolerance means tolerating personal beliefs too.” “Freedom of speech doesn’t mean freedom from consequences.” “Personal beliefs can [or cannot] be separate from the workplace.” “We shouldn’t let one righteous social cause get in the way of another one.” There’s truth in all of them. Not all of us have been able to put that together into a firm position. Maybe give us some space – repeating the axiom isn’t helping us get there.

We’ll figure it out. It may just be a resolution that doubt is OK. It may be a better understanding of shades of gray. But we hold enough in common, we do have a “right thing” that we can focus on even when the other stuff is harder to figure out. Mozillians have been coming together when it would be really easy to tear ourselves apart. The way we address this cognitive dissonance as we get back to the work of the open web will say a lot about us. I’m pretty certain it’s going to say something impressive.


Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Gian-Carlo Pascutto: Only what unites us

vr, 04/04/2014 - 19:19
If anything, the last week has given us quite some things where we can have great discussions about. I'd love to do a treatise on how free speech interacts with the ability to do Internet witch burnings, or how universal truths relate to political opinions, but the nerves are tense and the knives sharpened, so attempting to do so would most likely only be preaching to the converted. Maybe another time.

Yet, when looking at the questions for the upcoming Mozillians Town Hall meeting, there is a pattern that worries me, and I would like to address.

Mozilla is a community that organizes around a mission. The mission is set out in the Manifesto. The Manifesto uses rather broad language, e.g. "must enrich the lives of individual human beings".

If we have to learn anything from the past 10 days, it is that we can only survive as a community if we interpret this mission only in its most narrow scope, where we can and should find common ground. Attempting to read the Manifesto in the widest possible manner and presuming to find that all of our fellow Mozillians have done so in the same way is the road to failure as a group and a community. Our cultural differences are immense and things which we find self-evident can be unimaginable to other. We should group among the narrow set of goals that unites us, not among what divides us.

Mission creep is death. As a result, Mozilla is pragmatic. We've thrown efforts under the bus when we believed it to be necessary to survive. It personally still pains me that we threw VP8 under the bus in favor of H264, but choices have to be made about what hurts us least.

Now, if anyone wants to make the argument that an "open, participatory and accessible" Internet obviously has a direct and inalienable relation to an already-repealed law in the state of California in the United States of America that tried to refine the legal definition of marriage, so Mozilla must fight for this cause, then fine. I am not going to argue with you. I simply want to point out that the remainder of this post is not addressed to you.

Why do I want to make this point now? I have looked at the list of questions for the Town Hall Meeting, and I could summarize a fair number of the highest up voted ones as "Why do we think it is acceptable that the personal opinion of a Mozillian influences his career prospects in our community?"

I understand this question. I've struggled with it myself. Up until yesterday, I wouldn't have believed Brendan would step down simply because of the enormous implication that has in relation to the above. When I joined Mozilla, I was encouraged by my manager (Stuart or Doug, sorry forgot which of you two!): "We expect our contributors to have an opinion and speak out on it". This obviously does not mix with what has happened this week.

The answer though, is above: it is not our fight to fight. Should a political/moral opinion and monetary support for it be grounds for a week-long internet shitstorm ending in resignation? The Fox has no opinion on this issue. The fact that we have such wildly differing opinions on it is a clear sign: this is far from the Mozilla mission, and it's outside our scope until we can find common ground. Should we fight global warming? The Fox has no opinion. Should abortion be allowed? The Fox most certainly has no opinion on that one. Should we legalize marihuana? The Fox wonders what you've been smoking that you're even asking him. Should we be able to anonymously participate on the Internet? You bet.

The "why do our private opinions affect our work" question is inappropriate for the Town Hall, because it is not Mozilla's problem. We have to choose to focus only on what unites us.
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Frédéric Harper: Don’t hurt Mozilla

vr, 04/04/2014 - 19:06
Thanks to Sean Martell for the image

Thanks to Sean Martell for the image

The storm that hit Mozilla since a couple of days makes me sad…

I’m in favor of gay marriage. I also have lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender friends. I would have the same opinion without them in my life. I firmly believe in freedom, and I respect people who don’t have the same opinion or vision as me. I did not know Brendan Eich enough as I only meet him once. I did not have strong opinions about his nomination as the CEO of Mozilla. I trusted the people who made the decision, and I thought that it could not hurt to have one of the founders as the new leader. CEO question apart, I’m grateful to Brendan for his contribution to the Open Web, and the creation of Mozilla. Let’s not forget the invention of JavaScript.

Why I’m sad

I’m sad because I had to start this post with justification about my personal belief, and social life. I saw so many other posts or thread gone in the wrong direction. I’m sad because the web shown his ugly face: on both sides of the story or beliefs. More important, even if I was disappointed by Brendan donation, I’m sad because he resigned. It’s not exactly about him, but more about the consequences. Last, I’m sad because Mozilla, that was probably one of the most open organization I know, changed during the last days…

Don’t hurt Mozilla

The person who did the donation was Brendan Eich. The people who nominated him were the board members. Even if they are making high level decisions as nominating a CEO, they are not Mozilla. Mozilla is thousands of people, some paid staff, and many volunteers. Mozilla is the people who fight, and work for the web: we want the web to be more open, and we want more people to have access to it. Mozilla is you! The shit storm of the last days did not only hurt Brendan: it hurt Mozilla a lot. It hurt the people who worked for days, months, years to make the web a better place to be!

Please, don’t hurt Mozilla.

P.S.: I’m not sure this post pay honor to my thoughts or if it makes sense to add to the cacophony…


--
Don’t hurt Mozilla is a post on Out of Comfort Zone from Frédéric Harper

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Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Alex Vincent: Think about what you do and to who you do it.

vr, 04/04/2014 - 18:53

Think, for a moment, about the kind of man you throw out of office.   We’re talking about a revolutionary here.  A man who changed the way we live and work entirely.  A man who did everything he could to promote independence, writing missives that people listened to.

Yes, he had his faults.  What man doesn’t?  But he was a leader before he was the top dog, and he did very well as a leader.  He has laid his thumbprint on history with his works.  He put his heart and soul, and his reputation, on the line, day in and day out.

You might think I’m writing the above about Brendan Eich, and I am.  But consider this:  the same could be said for the third President of the United States of America.

Congratulations.  By the same rational thinking, we the people just threw Thomas Jefferson out of office because he once owned slaves.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mark Surman: Mozilla is human

vr, 04/04/2014 - 18:52

A few days ago I wrote: Mozilla is messy. For better and for worse, the week’s events showed how true that is.

Looking back at the past week, this also comes to mind: Mozilla is human. In all the best and worst ways. With all the struggle and all the inspiration. Mozilla is very very human.

On the inspiration part, I need to say: Brendan Eich is one of the most inspiring humans that I have ever met. He is a true hero for many of us. He invented a programming language that is the heart and soul of the most open communications system the world has ever known. He led a band of brilliant engineers and activists who freed the internet from the grip of Microsoft. And, one-on-one, in his odd and brilliant ways, he helped and advised so many of us as we put our own hearts and souls into building Mozilla and building the web. I was truly excited to see Brendan step into the role of CEO two weeks ago. And, today, I am equally sad.

It’s important to remember that all heroes are also human. They struggle. And they often have flaws. Brendan’s biggest flaw, IMHO, was his inability to connect and empathize with people. I’ve seen and felt that over the years, finding Bredan brilliant, but distant. And you certainly saw it this past week, as many calm and reasonable people said “Brendan, I want you to lead Mozilla. But I also want you to feel my pain.” Brendan didn’t need to change his mind on Proposition 8 to get out of the crisis of the past week. He simply needed to project and communicate empathy. His failure to do so proved to be his fatal flaw as CEO.

I would argue that Mozilla is filled with heroes. Thousands of them. All of them very human, just like Brendan. In the past week, I’ve spent every waking hour with these heroes. And I have watched them struggle. I’ve watched Mitchell struggle with how to protect the soul and spirit of a global community that is filled with passion, dreams, tensions and contradictions. I’ve watched the boards struggle with how to govern something that is at once a global social movement, a valuable consumer brand and a company based in the State of California. I have watched dozens and dozens of Mozillians reflect — and sometimes lash out — as they struggle to figure out what it means to be an individual contributor or leader inside this complex organism. And I myself have struggled with how to help Mozillians sort through all this complexity and messiness. Being human is messy. That is Mozilla.

As I look at the world’s reaction to all this, I want to clarify two things:

1. Brendan Eich was not fired. He struggled to connect and empathize with people who both respect him and felt hurt. He also got beat up. We all tried to protect him and help him get around these challenges until the very last hours. But, ultimately, I think Brendan found it impossible to lead under these circumstances. It was his choice to step down. And, frankly, I don’t blame him. I would have done the same.

2. This story is actually not about Brendan Eich. Of course, the critics and the media have made this a story about Brendan and his beliefs. But, as someone intimately involved in the evens of the past week, I would say in earnest: this is a story about Mozilla finding its soul and its spirit again. Over the past three years, we’ve become better at being A Company. I would argue we’ve also become worse at being Mozilla. We’ve become worse at caring for each other. Worse at holding the space for difference. Worse at working in the open. And worse at creating the space where we all can lead. These are the things that make Mozilla Mozilla. And they are the things we did not have enough of to properly find our way out of the crisis of the past two weeks.

Before getting into this kerfuffle, we were working on the right things. We were building a phone that will truly bring the web into the hands and the pockets of the world. We were teaching the world how the web works. And we were standing up against those who want to break the web or turn into a way to watch what each of us do every day. Those are still the things we need to be doing. And we need to start doing them again on Monday.

What we also need to do is start a process of rebirth and renewal. We need to find our soul and our spirit. The good news: Mozillians know how to do this. We know how to make a phoenix rise from the ashes. That is what we must now do.


Filed under: mozilla, webmakers
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Majken Connor: Moving lines

vr, 04/04/2014 - 18:32

One of the parts that is hard about this situation for Mozilla is that we don’t know where to draw the line now. People are worried that this is now a slippery slope, or that anyone could be pushed out because of outside views. I think as a community we need to accept the truth that Brendan wasn’t a viable CEO and figure out where this leaves the lines.

I think there is an obvious set of boundaries in this case that hopefully we can restrict this kind of scrutiny to stay within. The CEO is an outward facing position. When asked about the responsibilities of CEO vs CTO, Brendan answered that the CEO does a lot of working with partners and hiring. So the CEO interacts with people currently outside the Mozilla community. People who haven’t had the chance to build trust in us, in our CEO, in our way of doing things. I think if a director of HR had made a similar donation, it would also make it hard for people who must interact with that person to feel safe and trust them, even if they leave their personal beliefs at the door.

I am worried that next we’ll be expected to thoroughly vet candidates on their political views and actions. I think the problem in this case was that we already knew about Brendan’s donation, and still asked everyone to trust him anyway. But if we don’t thoroughly vet someone, and something comes to light, will we be expected to ask them to step down as well? I have a feeling the answer is yes.

I think for me the biggest lesson here is that the world doesn’t know us, and therefore they don’t trust us. I think this is partly our fault, we have focused on trying to win with users, and not on values. If the world knew us for our values, and not for our features, maybe we’d have had more people defending us, trusting us that we wouldn’t hire a CEO that would harm our contributors. They may still have called for Brendan to step down, but they would have been much more thoughtful about separating Brendan the individual from Mozilla the organization.

Is that wishful thinking? Sure, but we’re Mozilla. We’re good at wishing things, and we’re pretty damn awesome at making sure they come true.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Geoffrey MacDougall: The Day After: Thoughtful, angry, and hopeful posts about Mozilla

vr, 04/04/2014 - 18:12

The order they’re listed isn’t relevant. The posts are nuanced; I’ve just captured a small part. I encourage you to read them all and will keep adding throughout the day. And you can find more on Planet Mozilla.

“We fully support Mozilla, their mission, and trying to build back up the bridges that got torn down. We know many people are going to be upset by Eich stepping down, and some of them might send out a lot of hate. This has been a traumatic time for us, and we hope to never have to post anything about this again. We are software developers and we’d much rather spend our time building great software and helping people than being involved in a horrible mess like this.” – Hampton Catlin

“Our biggest problem is that the world does not know the story of Mozilla. Especially as a progressive at Mozilla, it was hard to watch as people who should know better pulled out the Chick-Fil-A playbook.” – Ben Moskowitz

“One of the parts that is hard about this situation for Mozilla is that we don’t know where to draw the line now. People are worried that this is now a slippery slope, or that anyone could be pushed out because of outside views. I think as a community we need to accept the truth that Brendan wasn’t a viable CEO and figure out where this leaves the lines.” – Kensie

“Brendan’s choice of what propositions and political parties to support do not match my personal choices and I’m sad when any restrictions affect only one group of people. But at the same time, in a democracy, people must be able to support and express their values. And hopefully, in the best of worlds, that leads to a good discussion and greater understanding.” – Robert Nyman

“Instead of addressing the issues at hand, he very clearly dodged them. I’m really not sure why and I’m at a loss to even speculate. Every one of my friends said that while they didn’t agree with his position, if he just apologized it could have been the end of it.” – TofuMatt

“On one hand, I disagree with Brendan’s personal views and think that his choice to step down is going to be ultimately good for us. … On the other hand, Brendan has always been a strong, (seemingly) just technical leader at Mozilla and I can’t help but feel that he was railroaded out, which isn’t right and also goes against what Mozilla stands for, in my eyes.” – Lizzilla

“Supporting Prop 8 is beyond the pale. But I don’t fully agree with the tactics that some of my friends have used in order to make that point. IMHO, rather than spending our energy attacking Brendan Eich and Firefox (which affected the entire Mozilla community) we should have devoted ourselves to supporting our friends within the Mozilla community as they grappled (many of them publicly) with the biggest crisis they’d ever encountered.” – Josh Levy

“Even as Brendan announced his departure, he provided next steps to advancing the mission by reaffirming Mozilla’s focus on users. The direction he provided could put the non-profit Mozilla as a users union leader to push back the bullying aspects of the Internet that prey on individuals (think of privacy policies or terms of services) and instead flip that around to be pro-user.” – edilee

“Wanted: New CEO for Mozilla. Qualifications: No history of being wrong, ever.” – Brandon Savage

“If we have to learn anything from the past 10 days, it is that we can only survive as a community if we interpret this mission only in its most narrow scope, where can and should find common ground. Attempting to read the Manifesto in the widest possible manner and presuming to find that all of our fellow Mozillians have done so in the same way is the road to failure as a group and a community. Our cultural differences are immense and things which we find self-evident can be unimaginable to other. We should group among the narrow set of goals that unites us, not among what divides us.” – Garf

What has Brendan done? Many things intrinsic to the open web; he helped shape technologies used by countless numbers of users, including to write and read this very post. Also, a hurtful and divisive thing based on a conviction now at odds with the law of the land, and at odds with my own conviction…” – aruner

“[Eich] did not understand that in order to be a CEO of a company, you have to renounce your heresy! There is only one permissible opinion at Mozilla, and all dissidents must be purged! Yep, that’s left-liberal tolerance in a nut-shell.” – Andrew Sullivan

“As a volunteer moderating the Facebook page, it was evident that we had many users complaining and very little supporters. Now that Brendan has resigned, everybody has all of a sudden come out from a shadow. Unexpectedly to say at the least, is that we’ve got users telling us that we were no longer protecting Freedom of speech and that rights are taken away. Where have these people been hiding?” – Andrew Truong

“It takes courage to face adversity in society, and that’s not a virtue I possess much of. Though I’ve come to value difference. Though at the same time, its important not to see valuing difference vs. valuing similarity as a dichotomy where you have to choose only one. We’re all similar in so many ways and sometimes, the difference is small.” – Chris Crews

“…what happened during the last days seems to be a negation of democracy. One should be able to express legal opinions without having to face a witch-hunt-like repression.” – Daniel Glazman

“Brendan Eich is one of the most inspiring humans that I have ever met. He is a true hero for many of us. He invented a programming language that is the heart and soul of the most open communications system the world has ever known… It’s important to remember that all heroes are also human. They struggle. And they often have flaws. Brendan’s biggest flaw, IMHO, was his inability to connect and empathize with people.” – Mark Surman

“If you tried, I don’t think you could engineer a situation that could throw the Mozilla community so thoroughly off-center. A lot of folks at Mozilla work here because we want to do what’s right. Doing the right thing can be hard, but overall we’re comfortable with taking on hardship to do the right thing.” – Dave Camp

“Follow the Mozilla mission on your own terms, because you know it’s the right thing to do. Do the right thing because it is the right thing.” – Ben Adida

“When the outrage was how a person with a different belief and – to me – very doubtful political action got made CEO people ganged up on Mozilla, my colleagues and friends and me how that could happen and how we can allow that. This was unfair.” – Christian Heilmann

“When suddenly the life my wife and I have built together seemed under any kind of threat, the monument of our public commitment to each other was the main thing to hold on to. Very often, critics of the notion of same-sex marriage seem to feel it can be reduced to something empty, as though symbolism carries no weight.  As though legal constructs around civil partnerships, common law marriages, tax codes, inheritance rights and so forth suffice.  All of that misses what’s important.” – Patrick Finch


Filed under: Mozilla
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Daniel Stenberg: curl and proxy headers

vr, 04/04/2014 - 17:44

Starting in the next curl release, 7.37.0, the curl tool supports the new command line option –proxy-header. (Completely merged at this commit.)

It works exactly like –header does, but will only include the headers in requests sent to a proxy, while the opposite is true for –header: that will only be sent in requests that will go to the end server. But of course, if you use a HTTP proxy and do a normal GET for example, curl will include headers for both the proxy and the server in the request. The bigger difference is when using CONNECT to a proxy, which then only will use proxy headers.

libcurl

For libcurl, the story is slightly different and more complicated since we’re having things backwards compatible there. The new libcurl still works exactly like the former one by default.

CURLOPT_PROXYHEADER is the new option that is the new proxy header option that should be set up exactly like CURLOPT_HTTPHEADER is

CURLOPT_HEADEROPT is then what an application uses to set how libcurl should use the two header options. Again, by default libcurl will keep working like before and use the CURLOPT_HTTPHEADER list in all HTTP requests. To change that behavior and use the new functionality instead, set CURLOPT_HEADEROPT to CURLHEADER_SEPARATE.

Then, the header lists will be handled as separate. An application can then switch back to the old behavior with a unified header list by using CURLOPT_HEADEROPT set to CURLHEADER_UNIFIED.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Pascal Finette: The World in 2035

vr, 04/04/2014 - 16:57

A few weeks ago I attended the World Business Dialogue 2014 in Cologne, Germany where the organizers asked me to write an essay about how I see the world in 20 years from now for a book they published. Here it is.

The last 20 years in technology have been dominated by Moore’s Law: Intel’s cofounder Gordon E. Moore predicted in 1965 that over the history of computing hardware, the number of transistors on integrated circuits doubles approximately every two years. In essence: Computers get twice as fast every two years.

Since the ENIAC, the first electronic general-purpose computer built in 1946, we have seen the rise and (partial) displacement of four main computing paradigms: Starting with mainframes in the 1940s, which took up whole rooms full of computing equipment and were only used by very few select organizations. Those early highly specialized computers were replaced in the 60s by minicomputers, which for the first time brought access to computers into the realm of the average size corporation. Twenty years later the meteoric rise of personal computers led to the PC revolution - giving access to computers to large parts of society. With introduction of the the PC, machines also became more versatile. What was once purely a business tool soon became a platform for creation, consumption and communication. Shortly after the introduction of the PC the Internet connected all those disjunct machines into one global network which led to unprecedented opportunities: It allowed for communication, commerce and collaboration on a scale never experienced before. Today we are in the middle of the mobile revolution: PCs are increasingly being replaced by mobile phones and tablets. Small, personal computing devices which are always with us, always on and always connected.

All these cycles were fueled by Moore’s Law and the linear growth trend it predicted.

With the advent of new technologies in areas ranging from artificial intelligence & robotics to nanotechnology, biotechnology & bioinformatics, medicine & neuroscience, networks & computing systems and energy & environmental systems we see this model being replaced by the Law of Accelerating Returns: Growth is not linear anymore but exponential.

The shift toward exponential growth is probably the most fundamental we have seen as a species. Take the exponential growth of information: From the start of time until the year 2003 all of mankind produced an estimated five exabyte (five billion gigabytes) of information. The same amount of information is now created in about 10 minutes (that is to say - we create the same amount of information as we did in the last 5,000 years of our existence in a mere 10 minutes today). This shift coincides with other trends: Dematerialization, 3D printing, artificial intelligence and machine learning, rapidly dropping costs for anything from genome sequencing to connected (smart) devices and cloud computing.

The next twenty years will see a host of new interventions - all delivered at a rapidly increasing pace: It took Apple and the rest of the industry a mere three years to introduce the tablet and then sell more of them than personal computers. Or take biotechnology: It took the Human Genome Project 15 years and $3 billion to fully sequence the first human genome in 2003; the same feat will be done this year for less than $1,000 and in just a couple of hours.

And given the problems we as a society are facing, we will require this kind of approach and thinking: The World Bank predicts that we need to create 600 million new jobs in the next twenty years to sustain our current employment rate. Global Warming (or probably more accurately Global Weirding) has a dramatic effect on the habitability of our planet. We will add another two billion people to the world’s population - which already suffers from a distinct lack of access to clean drinking water (one billion people today), relevant household income (three billion people live on less than $2.50 per day), electricity and medical support. Linear growth will just not get us there.

Exponential growth requires exponential thinking - As a species we are ill-equipped to process this seismic change. Humans tend to underestimate exponential trends and extrapolate growth trends in a linear fashion. And yet - those of us who can identify those opportunities and act upon them will be those who dominate the next wave of industries to come.

The new industries will be created by starting from a perspective of 10x improvements - not 10%. Surprisingly it is often easier to make something 10 times better than to improve it by a mere 10%: Because when you’re working to make things 10% better, you inevitably focus on the existing tools and assumptions, and on building on top of an existing solution that many people have already spent a lot of time thinking about. Such incremental progress is driven by extra effort, extra money, and extra resources. When you aim for a 10x gain, you lean instead on bravery and creativity - the kind that, literally and metaphorically, can put a man on the moon.

With that being said expect every single industry to be disrupted and digitized. Expect software and algorithms to further automate our value chains. Expect wetware (the protocols and molecular devices used in molecular biology and synthetic biology) to be the new hardware and DNA being the new software. And expect the business models which drive our growth to look significantly different than what we experience today.

We’ve long witnessed the death of traditional business hierarchies, cubicle farms and 9-to-5 jobs… Organizations which want to thrive in a world of exponential growth need to be nimble, quick, creative and not afraid of disrupting themselves. We will see many more small startups building significant audiences, outsourcing large parts of their value chain to specialized providers. Open innovation practices (where innovation comes both from inside and outside of the organization) will become the norm rather than the exception. Design thinking, the practice of combining deep empathy for the context of a problem, creativity in the generation of insights and solutions, and rationality to analyze and fit solutions to the context will be standard operating procedure for companies.

So what do you do with all this today? First of all: Guard yourself from linear thinking. When looking at an opportunity space try to identify what exponential growth will look like. Pick a big problem: something huge, long existing, or on a truly global scale. Articulate a radical solution - one which would actually solve the problem. Then figure out the concrete evidence that this solution is feasible, that it’s not just wild dreaming (this can often be found in some breakthrough in technology, engineering or science). Once you have all three ingredients together you get to work. And shape the next twenty years.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Edward Lee: Why I’m a Mozillian

vr, 04/04/2014 - 15:43

I became a Mozillian 10 years ago when I started participating in Bugzilla and helping with the Spread Firefox campaign, earning both the 25 million and 50 million-downloads coins. I was just a freshman at the University of Illinois studying Computer Science, but I was eager to help the non-profit Mozilla create a web browser that promotes user choice for liberty.

SF Mozilla Monument

San Francisco Mozilla Monument

Mozilla’s founders created the mission for openness, innovation and opportunity on the Internet; and because of that, I was able to find my passion of helping people. In between lectures, I hacked on open source Firefox to create the AwesomeBar through many iterations of conversing with individuals to learn about their specific needs. I collaborated with other Mozillians to come up with ideas and to implement them into this Firefox feature which still provides better and faster choices for everyone.

Yesterday, I cried when I learned that one of Mozilla’s co-founders was leaving [brendaneich.com]. It was the most I’ve cried since my mother passed away, and in some sense it was appropriate as Brendan is a “founding father” of the organization I’ve dedicated over a third of my life to.

Even as Brendan announced his departure, he provided next steps to advancing the mission by reaffirming Mozilla’s focus on users. The direction he provided could put the non-profit Mozilla as a users union leader to push back the bullying aspects of the Internet that prey on individuals (think of privacy policies or terms of services) and instead flip that around to be pro-user [blog.mozilla.org].

I’m a Mozillian because the founders made Mozilla with the mission. I believed in the mission when I became a Mozillian, and I still believe in it now — especially with this golden opportunity for Mozilla to fight for users. I hope all Mozillians can continue to collaborate together to make the world a better place for everyone.

- Ed Lee

No comments
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Brandon Savage: Wanted: New CEO for Mozilla

vr, 04/04/2014 - 15:34
With Brendan Eich departing Mozilla just two weeks after he was hired as CEO, the Mozilla board is about to undertake a second CEO search, and I imagine they are understandably exhausted from the first one (as well as the backlash). Thus, I have taken the liberty of writing this job ad, which they are […]
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Arun K. Ranganathan: FAQtechism

vr, 04/04/2014 - 15:13

What is this?

Questions and answers, because my friends and I have been doing a lot of asking and answering, in unequal measure, with more asking than answering. Because I’ve been distraught by the incessant stream of reductionist observations about Mozilla, each one like being punched in the heart with the hard fists of righteousness and conviction. Because questions and answers once brought me peace, when I was much younger.

Who are you?

A man with no titles. Formerly, one of the first technology evangelists for Mozilla, when it was still a Netscape project. A Mozillian.

Who is Brendan Eich?

A man with a title titles. An inventor. A unifier. A divider. A Mozillian. A friend.

What has Mozilla done?

From humble and unlikely beginnings, Mozilla entered a battle seemingly already decided against it, and gradually unseated the entrenched incumbent, user by user by user, through campaigns that were traditional and radically innovative, and increased consciousness about the open web. It became a beloved brand, standing firmly for open source and the open web, championing the Internet, sometimes advocating politically for these convictions. It relied, and continues to rely, on a community of contributors from all over the world.

What has Brendan done?

Many things intrinsic to the open web; he helped shape technologies used by countless numbers of users, including to write and read this very post. Also, a hurtful and divisive thing based on a conviction now at odds with the law of the land, and at odds with my own conviction: in 2008, he donated $1000 to California Proposition 8, which put on a statewide ballot a proposition to define marriage as strictly between a man and a woman in the state, thus eliminating gay marriage, and calling into question pre-existing gay marriages. The amount donated was enough to oblige him to list his employer — Mozilla — for legal reasons.

What are my convictions?

That any two people in love should be able to marry, regardless of their genders; that the marriage of two such people affords all legal protections intrinsic to the institution of marriage including immigration considerations, estate planning considerations, and visitation rights. That this is in fact a civil right. That matters of civil rights should not be put before a population to vote on as a statewide proposition; in short, that exceptions to the Equal Protection Clause cannot be decided by any majority, since it is there to protect minorities from majorities (cf.Justice Moreno).

How do such convictions become law?

Often, by fiat. Sometimes, even when the battle is already seemingly decided (with the entrenched weight of history behind it, an incumbent), one state at a time. State by State by State (by States), using campaigns that are traditional and innovative, to increase consciousness about this as a civil right.

How should people with different convictions disagree?

Bitterly, holding fast to conviction, so that two individuals quarrel ceaselessly till one yields to the other, or till one retreats from the other, unable to engage any longer.

For real?

Amicably, by setting aside those convictions that are unnecessary to the pursuit of common convictions I share with other Mozillians, like the open web. Brendan embodied the Mozilla project; he would have made a promising CEO. My conviction can be governed by reason, and set aside, especially since the issue is decided by courts, of both law and public opinion. His view, only guessable by me, seems antediluvian. Times have changed. I can ask myself to be governed by reason. We need never touch this question.

But I can do this because my conviction about the law, stated before, has never been tested personally by the specter of suicide or the malevolence of bullying; marriage equality is the ultimate recognition, destigmatizing lifestyles, perhaps helping with suicide and bullying. And, my inability to marry has never disrupted my life or my business. I cannot ask others to lay aside convictions, without recognizing the sources of pain, and calling them out.

What will the future hold?

Brendan has said his non serviam but calls out a mission which I think is the right one: privacy, also a civil right, especially privacy from governments; continued user advocacy; data liberation; a check on walled gardens (and an end to digital sharecropping); the web as mobile platform, even though it is under threat in the mobile arena, the battle seemingly decided, the entrenched incumbent slightly less obvious. This latter — mobile — is reminiscent of the desktop world in 1998. It’s the same story, with smaller machines. Perhaps the same story will have to be told again. I’d like Mozilla to be a major player in that story, just as it always has been a major player on the web. And I’ll be looking forward to seeing what Brendan does next. I’ll miss him as part of Mozilla. This has been crushing.

Coda: what have wise ones said?

“I don’t know why we’re talking about tolerance to begin with. We should be at acceptance and love. What’s this tolerance business? What are you tolerating, backpain? ‘I’ve been tolerating backpain, and the gay guy at work?’” — Hari Kondabalu (watch him on Letterman). And blog posts: Mozilla is not Chick-Fil-A; Thinking about Mozilla; The Hounding of a Heretic (Andrew Sullivan); a few others, discussing what a CEO should do, and what qualities a CEO should possess, which are out there for you to discover.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Robert Nyman: On Mozilla, Brendan & the future

vr, 04/04/2014 - 15:08

As I’m sure many of you are already aware of, Brendan Eich has resigned as CEO and is leaving Mozilla and Mitchell Baker, our Executive Chairwoman, expressed more about Mozilla and the situation. I haven’t said anything publicly about this so far, but I believe some things have to be mentioned.

Different opinions

Personally, I’ve been fortunate enough to have made friends with many different and varying backgrounds, etnicity, sexual orientation, political opinions, takes on religion and much more; and I wish that mix was even bigger. Because I learn so much from them and their perspectives and view on things, I’d like to believe both I and them get a richer way to think about the world.

I don’t necessarily agree with them in some cases, but I always respect their right to that opinion and the possibility for us to discuss it. And I naturally believe all of them deserve the same rights to their values and legal rights in their lives. Therefore, Brendan’s choice of what propositions and political parties to support do not match my personal choices and I’m sad when any restrictions affect only one group of people. But at the same time, in a democracy, people must be able to support and express their values. And hopefully, in the best of worlds, that leads to a good discussion and greater understanding.

Possible actions and opinions

When all this came out about Brendan’s lack of support for gay people having the right to get married, maybe it would have been easier if he had immediately apologized about how his actions might have hurt people, and made their lives harder. Without giving up his political values, but publicly showing more empathy towards people affected, and to have a constructive discussion about values. But, for integrity reasons or others, he never wanted to have a public discussion about his values, and that’s his choice.

In hindsight, though, it’s always easy to be wise, to think alternative approaches would have solved it all. Given the current state, the outcome seems like it was inevitable. Now Brendan has left Mozilla and has also decided to not be on Twitter anymore either.

Reading the tons of articles, tweets and much more surrounding this issue, though, one thing that worries me is the notion of a mob rule. The criticism hasn’t often been very nuanced, a lot of cries for “Resign” and lack of will to discuss the greater picture and the complicated topic this is. It has more seemed like an “of course you can have any opinion you want, as long as it’s the same as mine”-approach.

Yes, Brendan might have a political opinion that not you, nor I, want to support. But at the same time, and I think it needs to be pointed and remembered, with Mozilla he has created one of the most open and diverse organizations I know of, defending the rights of all users out there. There is literally all kinds of people and backgrounds both within the Mozilla organization and community, and the users across the world that Mozilla works for to help and protect.

And the argument that just because he became the CEO, he would change the organization and people in it to all become anti-gay is just ridiculous. He co-founded Mozilla 16 years ago, been on the board of the Mozilla Foundation and has constantly worked to make the web open and inclusive to everyone. There is no reason that would change, nor that people would just accept such a possible change.

Without Mozilla, I’m certain that the web, and the rights of users, would look very different. We need to respect that enormous work that was put in to make that happen and make sure that the torch is being carried on.

What about Mozilla?

Mozilla is filled with people working really hard to make sure the web stays open, that it is available for everyone and to protect users’ rights and their integrity.

These recent events have hurt us, and we could point fingers forever, shifting blame. But I’d rather see us move forward, both as an organization and with the help of you out there, to keep on making the web and the world better.

We are here, and we will continue to be, for as long as we can. Because we truly and genuinely believe it’s the best thing for all of us.

Picture by Sean Martell – please use it, share the love and help us help everyone out there (EPS version)

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Gervase Markham: Recent Events

vr, 04/04/2014 - 11:14

It’s possible some people may want to discuss or give their view on recent events but, given the strength and tone of opinion expressed already, may not feel safe doing so in public. If that’s true of you, please feel free to email me at gerv@mozilla.org. I’m available to talk.

I may produce anonymous summaries of what people are saying to me so that others can understand how people are feeling; I want everyone to feel their voices can be heard. But if you want that not to happen for you, just say.

If you need it, you can find my PGP public key here.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Marco Zehe: Improvements to the handling of the aria-pressed attribute

vr, 04/04/2014 - 10:57

On Monday this week, Heydon Pickering brought to my attention that Firefox has a problem with the way it handles the aria-pressed attribute in some circumstances. aria-pressed is used on buttons (or elements that have a WAI-ARIA role of “button”) to turn it into a toggle button which can be either pressed or not. Think of the Bold, Italic, etc. toolbar buttons in your favorite word processor as an example.

The problem Heydon uncovered in his simple toolbar example was that we didn’t expose the “pressed” state in his case. Upon investigation, both Steve Faulkner and I found that a) a native button element was used and b) adding the role of “button” fixed the problem.

This was certainly not the way we should handle a native button which has the aria-pressed attribute added, when we already turned its role from “button” into “toggle button”. Because we’re dealing with a native button, adding role=”button” should not at all be necessary.

I decided to dive into the code myself and fix the problem. This was my first dive into the C++ core of Firefox in way over a year, and it turned out to be a much bigger project than I originally thought, in which I learned a lot about some of the new structure Alex and Trevor had been introducing. But in the end, we now have:

  1. You can use the aria-pressed state attribute on a native button, and its states will correctly be exposed.
  2. When state changes, assistive technologies will be notified via an event, so NVDA’s virtual buffer will immediately reflect the change, for example.
  3. While I was there, I also removed the “checkable” state from the toggle button accessible. Checkable is something reserved for checkboxes and radio buttons. Toggle buttons are slightly different not only in visual appearance, but also in that they can be either: Stand-alone like your attribute toolbar buttons “Bold”, “Italic” etc., or part of a group where only one can be checked at a time, like “Left justified”, “right justified” etc. Applying the checkable state to these is not appropriate, and it caused screen readers to say nonsense like “A to Z toggle button pressed not checked”. Well, that nonsense is no more! :)
  4. Finally, i also updated the bridge code between the Gecko core and the Android and Firefox OS output to work with this new set of changes, so there, toggle buttons will now also properly speak and braille.

I just checked this code into our tree called Mozilla-Inbound, from where it will travel to Mozilla-Central within the next day or so, from where Firefox Nightly builds are made. So those of you on the bleeding edge will probably see this appear in a build around Sunday April 6, or Monday April 7 or so. This will then be in the Firefox 31 release.

Thanks to Heydon for finding this bug in Firefox! And thanks to Alex for his support while I muddled through some of the new stuff in core! :) This was fun, and it felt good to write a real patch again after such a long time where I mostly did testing and evangelism.

flattr this!

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Tim Taubert: Starting my fourth year at Mozilla

vr, 04/04/2014 - 10:41

Today marks the beginning of my fourth year at Mozilla. It has been an amazing three years and the best job I could hope for. Since March I am now in the position of an Engineering Manager with a few highly intelligent and great people that I am very grateful to call my team.

I am super excited about all the personal and professional challenges I will be facing this year. It is my core belief that it is all about growth and for that Mozilla is exactly the right place to be.

<3

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mark Côté: Bugzfeed: Bugzilla push notifications

vr, 04/04/2014 - 06:13

A large number of external applications have grown up around Bugzilla serving a variety of purposes. One thing many of these apps have in common is a need to get updates from Bugzilla. Unfortunately, the only way to get notifications of changes was, until recently, to poll Bugzilla. Everyone knows that polling is bad, particularly because it doesn’t scale well, but until recently there was no alternative.

Thus I would like to introduce to the world Bugzfeed, a WebSocket app that allows you to subscribe to one or more bugs and get pushed notifications when they change. It’s rather a small app, based on Tornado, and has a very simple interface, so it should scale quite nicely. It relies on a few moving parts to work, but I’ll start with the basics and explain the whole system later.

The production version is at ws://bugzfeed.mozilla.org. I also made a very simple (and ugly) example app for you to use and examine. A development version of Bugzfeed is available at ws://bugzfeed-dev.allizom.org; it’s tied to the development Bugzilla server, so it’s a good place to experiment if you’re a Mozilla contributor; you can make whatever changes you need to bugzilla-dev without worrying about messing with production data. You’ll need to get someone in #bmo on irc.mozilla.org to reset your password, since we periodically refresh and sanitize the database on bugzilla-dev, and email is disabled so you can’t reset it yourself.

(This makes me think that there should probably be a Bugzfeed instance tied to Landfill; maybe I’ll look into that, in particular if we implement middleware other than Pulse (see below).)

Client commands, responses, and notifications are all in JSON format. The project wiki page has the full list of commands. Here’s a little example of what you need to send to subscribe to bugs 1234 and 5678:

{"command": "subscribe", "bugs": [1234, 5678]}

The server will send a simple response, including a list of all the bugs you are (now) subscribed to:

{"command": "subscribe", "result": "ok", "bugs": [1234, 5678]}

Now you can just wait for notifications to be pushed from the server to your app:

{"command": "update", "bug": 1234, "when": "2014-04-03T21:13:45"}

Wait, you are probably asking, that’s it? That’s all I get?

The short answer is yup, that’s it. You can now use the regular REST API to get further details about what changed.

The longer answer is yup, that’s it, because security. Bugzilla has evolved a very fine-grained security system. We have bugs, attachments, and even comments that can only be seen by a privileged few, due to security, legal, and other considerations. Furthermore, many of the variables involved in determining whether a particular user can see a particular bug/attachment/comment can change at any time: not only can elements of a bug shift between public and confidential, but so can a user’s groups, and the groups themselves. Monitoring for all those possible changes would make this app significantly more complex and brittle, so we opted for the most secure notification, which is also the simplest: just a bug ID and a timestamp. All the other work is handled by the standard Bugzilla APIs.

(You might also be asking “why is ‘update’ considered a command?” and, to be honest, I’m not sure, so maybe that’ll change.)

There are other commands, and some limited caching of changes in case your client disconnects; see the project wiki page for more.

So how does it work? Here’s a system diagram created by contributor musingmario:

Bugzfeed system diagram

The four main pieces (with links to source) are

On the Bugzilla side, the BMO team created an extension which writes the bug ID and timestamp to a table when any bug changes. A simple Python app polls this table and sends all the updates to Pulse, cleaning up the table as it does so.

Pulse is a Mozilla RabbitMQ server with a specific configuration and message format implementing the publish/subscribe pattern. The usage is somewhat Mozilla specific, but it would be pretty easy to set up a similar system or even modify Bugzfeed and the Bugzilla shim to use RabbitMQ directly, or a different AMQP system like ØMQ.

Notifications from all bugs flow through Pulse; it is Bugzfeed, the WebSocket server, that does the filtering for its clients to notify only on subscribed bugs. Subscribing to individual notifications from Pulse is possible via topics, but this requires one channel per bug, so I doubt it would be any more efficient if hundreds of clients are connected to Bugzfeed.

While you could have the Bugzfeed server read directly from the Bugzilla database, eliminating the shim and the queuing system, having an intermediary allows us to easily stand up more Bugzfeed servers if load gets too high, as each Bugzfeed instance would see the stream of changes via its own subscriber queue. We can also easily interface new applications to the notification stream, such as the BMO Elastic Search cluster.

Enough technicalities; go out and play with it! And if you want to adapt it for your own Bugzilla installation, I’d be more than willing to help out.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Andrew Truong: A Slap Across The Face

vr, 04/04/2014 - 05:13

With Brendan resigning from Mozilla, like many others, I have mixed emotions. It's tough to have the past haunt and chase you but trying to keep strong at the same time is hard. As a volunteer moderating the Facebook page, it was evident that we had many users complaining and very little supporters. Now that Brendan has resigned, everybody has all of a sudden come out from a shadow. Unexpectedly to say at the least, is that we've got users telling us that we were no longer protecting Freedom of speech and that rights are taken away. Where have these people been hiding?

I guess it's okay to speak out about how we truly feel when somebody resigns over a controversial topic but not to speak out during the controversy? We should ALWAYS speak out. Freedom of Speech.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Chris Crews: Things Change…

vr, 04/04/2014 - 03:12

“If all mankind minus one, were of one opinion, and only one person were of the contrary opinion, mankind would be no more justified in silencing that one person, than he, if he had the power, would be justified in silencing mankind.” -John Stuart Mill

I used to be involved in Mozilla… In the run up to Firefox 1.0 10 years ago I was responsible for developing the early verson of the Mozilla Add-ons website. Things change.Later, I became responsible for firebot, after the other IRC bots gradually went offline, I took over mozbot development, such as it is, as owner of the most used bot on the platform, it made sense. Again, things change.

I still maintain firebot, but I don’t actively develop it. Now, I’m a student and photographer at my university and my life has moved away from being involved in the tech. community. I still use my technical skills to help where I can, which is why I accepted a position doing web development and technical management for student media this past fall. Its been a challenge balancing a mostly visual medium and a technical one at the same time. Things changed again.

Since my involvement long ago I also became comfortable with being gay and am lucky enough to have been in a relationship with a guy I love and I know loves me. It takes courage to face adversity in society, and that’s not a virtue I possess much of. Though I’ve come to value difference. Though at the same time, its important not to see valuing difference vs. valuing similarity as a dichotomy where you have to choose only one. We’re all similar in so many ways and sometimes, the difference is small. Embracing the difference can over time, create even more difference. Its harder to see how we’re the same as somebody else than it is to see difference.

I’ve also come to realize that change, isn’t always progressive, and what looks like progress can hide other dangers. Progress is self-validating for the thing labeled progressive, and its too easy to dismiss those that seem to stand in its way but that is no more right than any other form of censorship, of devaluing one way of conceiving of an idea, like what it means to be attracted to someone, or how to construct their lives together, as opposed to another.

I’ve seen recently, too many comments that want to devalue people who stand in the way of progress as exactly the thing that they are trying to fight. LGBT issues were marginalized, and oppressed by society. Oppression is wrong, but don’t be too quick to think that marginalized groups can’t marginalize others, pushing views aside because they fail to meet socially acceptable criteria, whether that criteria is progress, equality or religion and heteronormativity. We might just all realize that for all someones faults, combining ideas, and not combating them, might just result in a new idea, a new change for all.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Ben Moskowitz: Mozilla Is Not Chick-Fil-A

vr, 04/04/2014 - 02:49

In 2012 the southern fried chicken restaurant Chick-Fil-A became the unlikely battlefield for marriage equality in America. Through a strange turn of events, same-sex marriage advocates and opponents converged on Chick-Fil-A franchises across the country. People lined up to buy chicken sandwiches in solidarity or to stage a boycott.

One thing’s for sure. If you eat at Chick-Fil-A, your money will support anti-gay causes. So if the long march of progress makes a fast food drive-thru a site of civic participation, well, that’s surreal—but it’s democracy in action.

This evening draws the conclusion of 11 disheartening days at Mozilla: the brief tenure of its co-founder as CEO. So why am I thinking about chicken sandwiches?

Eich is one of maybe a dozen living individuals who can claim to have built the open web. In 15 years of working at Mozilla, Eich never let his personal beliefs color his work. He and others grew Mozilla from a hobby into a world changing social movement. And, incredibly, they did it in a completely apolitical way.

But Eich as CEO was symbolic to a lot of people. It’s why people like Hampton Catlin and his husband, co-owners of a web development firm, took a stand. They and others called for Eich to apologize for funding the Prop 8 campaign or to step down. (I have complete respect for Hampton and have enjoyed several very constructive conversations with him over the past two weeks.)

The crisis that emerged over this issue was partially self-inflicted. We failed to manage the crisis. And a lot of our own people acted badly—from the top on down. We acknowledge this:

We didn’t act like you’d expect Mozilla to act. We didn’t move fast enough to engage with people once the controversy started. We’re sorry. We must do better.

At the same time, gestures from OKCupid and others show that our biggest problem is that the world does not know the story of Mozilla. Especially as a progressive at Mozilla, it was hard to watch as people who should know better pulled out the Chick-Fil-A playbook.

Contrast Chick-Fil-A with Mozilla. The Atlanta-based company has donated upwards of $5 million dollars to PACs opposed to same-sex marriage, and the company’s chief operating officer is on record that same-sex marriage advocates were “inviting God’s judgement on the nation.” Mozilla is a collective of happy mutants who want to make the world better, whose original logo was designed by Shepherd Fairey.

Mozilla was never Chick-Fil-A. A user’s decision to use Firefox would never fund anti-gay causes. The first reason is that we’re not a profit-seeking organization. The second reason is that we would never fund anti-gay causes!

We watched this week as Mozilla, a global non-profit and volunteer community making a free product to benefit humanity, was stained with the taint of homophobia, retrograde opinions, and hate.

It was an expensive moral panic. And though I am heartened that people like Andrew Sullivan feel the same:

Will he now be forced to walk through the streets in shame? Why not the stocks? The whole episode disgusts me – as it should disgust anyone interested in a tolerant and diverse society. If this is the gay rights movement today – hounding our opponents with a fanaticism more like the religious right than anyone else – then count me out. If we are about intimidating the free speech of others, we are no better than the anti-gay bullies who came before us.

…it’s still our fault. This was a critical test of our ability to tell our story, and we failed.

To many of the people who drew incorrect conclusions about Mozilla and our character, we might as well be selling chicken sandwiches.

What do we do from here? Mozilla needs to do a better job of explaining how we’re different. We need to play to our strengths—community, disruptive innovation, doing things in unconventional ways. Even in this storm, you could see some of those silver linings.

Mozilla needs to re-embrace the core of who we are and where we came from. In our products, in our initiatives, in our leadership. Let’s take on big challenges and pick fights again. Let’s not be like the other guys, and make sure the world knows it.

The great irony of all this is that Brendan Eich would have been the best person to return to us to these roots.

For the record, I don’t believe Brendan Eich is a bigot. He’s stubborn, not hateful. He has an opinion. It’s certainly not my opinion, but it was the opinion of 52% of people who voted on Prop 8 just six years ago, and the world is changing fast.

Most of this is ambiguous. Some of it is painful. I am equally disappointed in Mozillians and in demagogues who didn’t see the irony in hounding someone for their private opinion because of “intolerance.”

But one thing is clear: we need to treat all good people with respect and dignity, regardless of who they are or what they believe. I am glad now that the world will have a chance to know our character. And I am grateful to Brendan Eich for all that he’s done for the open web. I hope that in time he will find a way to return to the project and provide the technical leadership that Mozilla, and the world, so greatly needs.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

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