mozilla

Mozilla Nederland LogoDe Nederlandse
Mozilla-gemeenschap

Abonneren op feed Mozilla planet
Planet Mozilla - http://planet.mozilla.org/
Bijgewerkt: 1 maand 3 weken geleden

Firefox Nightly: Preview Storage API in Firefox Nightly

ma, 17/07/2017 - 12:36

We are happy to announce that the Storage API feature is ready for testing in Firefox Nightly Desktop!

Storage API The Storage API allows Web sites to find out how much space users can use (quota), how much they are already using (usage) and can also tell Firefox to store this data persistently and per origin. This feature is available only in secure contexts (HTTPS). You can also use Storage APIs via Web Workers. There are plenty of APIs that can be used for storage, e.g.,  localStorage, IndexedDB. The data stored for a Web site managed by Storage API — which is defined by the Storage Standard specification — includes:
  • IndexedDB databases
  • Cache API data
  • Service Worker registrations
  • Web Storage API data
  • History state information saved using pushState()
  • Notification data
Storage limits

The maximum browser storage space is dynamic — it is based on your hard drive size when Firefox is launching. The global limit is calculated as 50% of free disk space. There’s also another limit called group limit — basically this is defined as 20% of the global limit, to prevent individual sites from using exorbitant amounts of storage where there is a free space, the group limit is set to 2GB (maximum). Each origin is part of a group (group of origins).

Site Storage Basically, each origin has an associated site storage unit. Site storage consists of zero or more site storage units. A site storage unit contains a single box. A box has a mode which is either “best-effort” or “persistent”. Traditionally, when users run out of storage space on their device, data stored with these APIs gets lost without the user being able to intervene, because modern browsers automatically manage storage space, it stores data until quota is reached and do housekeeping work automatically,  it’s called “best-effort” mode. But this doesn’t fit web games, or music streaming sites which might have offline storage use cases for commute-friendly purpose, since storage space will be evicted when available storage space is low, it will be an awful experience to re-download data again. And web games or music sites may need more space, “best-effort” mode is  also bound by group limit, upper bound is just 2GB. With Storage API, if the site has “persistent-storage” permission, it can call navigator.storage.persist(), let user decide to keep site data manually, and that is “persistent” mode. if (navigator.storage && navigator.storage.persist) {   navigator.storage.persist().then(persisted => {     if (persisted)       console.log(“Persistent mode. Quota is bound by global limit (50% of disk space).”);     else       console.log(“Best-effort mode. Storage may be evicted under storage pressure.");   }); }

Site Storage Units

  • Each example is independent here.
  • If a user allows the site to store persistently, the user can store more data into disk, and the site storage quota for origin is not limited by group limit but global limit.
  • Site Storage Unit of Origin A consists three different types of storage, IndexedDB Databases, Local Storage, Cache API Data; Site Storage Unit of Origin B consists Cache API Data only. Site Storage Unit of Origin A and Bs’ quota is limited to global limit.
  • Site Storage Unit of Origin C is full, it is reached to quota (global limit) and can’t store any data without removing existed site storage data. UA will start to evict “best-effort” site storage units under a least recently used (LRU policy), if all best-effort site storage units are freed but still not enough, the user agent will send storage pressure notification to clear storage explicitly. See below thex storage pressure notification screenshot. Firefox may notify users when data usage is more than 90% of global limit to clear storage.
  • Site Storage Unit of Origin D is also full, the box mode is “best-effort”, so quota is storage limit per origin (Firefox 56 is still bound by group limit), and best-effort mode is smaller than persistent storage. User agent will try to retain the data contained in the box for as long as it can, but will not warn users if storage space runs low and it becomes necessary to clear the box to relieve the storage pressure.

Indicate user to clear persistent storage

 

 

Persistent Storage Permission

Preferences – Site Data

 

If user “persist” the site, that site data of that origin won’t be evicted until the user manually delete them in Preferences. With the new ‘Site Data Manager’, the user now can manage site data easily and delete persistent site data manually in the same place. Although cookies are not part of Site Storage, Site Storage should be cleared along with cookies to prevent user tracking or data inconsistency.

Storage API is now available for testing in Firefox Nightly 56.

What’s currently supported
  • navigator.storage.estimate()
  • navigator.storage.persist()
  • navigator.storage.persisted()
  • new Site Data Manager in Preferences
  • IndexedDB, asm.js caching, Cache API data are managed by Storage API
Storage API V1.5
  • Local Storage/History state information/Notification data are managed by Storage API
Storage API V2
  • Multiple Boxes
Try it Out To use the new Site Data Manager, open “Privacy Preferences” (you can type about:preferences#privacy in the address bar). Click the “Settings…” button besides “Site Data”.

Take a look at the Storage api wiki page for much more information and to get involved.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Robert O'Callahan: Confession Of A C/C++ Programmer

ma, 17/07/2017 - 06:31

I've been programming in C and C++ for over 25 years. I have a PhD in Computer Science from a top-ranked program, and I was a Distinguished Engineer at Mozilla where for over ten years my main job was developing and reviewing C++ code. I cannot consistently write safe C/C++ code. I'm not ashamed of that; I don't know anyone else who can. I've heard maybe Daniel J. Bernstein can, but I'm convinced that, even at the elite level, such people are few and far between.

I see a lot of people assert that safety issues (leading to exploitable bugs) with C and C++ only afflict "incompetent" or "mediocre" programmers, and one need only hire "skilled" programmers (such as, presumably, the asserters) and the problems go away. I suspect such assertions are examples of the Dunning-Kruger effect, since I have never heard them made by someone I know to be a highly skilled programmer.

I imagine that many developers successfully create C/C++ programs that work for a given task, and no-one ever fuzzes or otherwise tries to find exploitable bugs in those programs, so those developers naturally assume their programs are robust and free of exploitable bugs, creating false optimism about their own abilities. Maybe it would be useful to have an online coding exercise where you are given some apparently-simple task, you write a C/C++ program to solve it, and then your solution is rigorously fuzzed for exploitable bugs. If any such bugs are found then you are demoted to the rank of "incompetent C/C++ programmer".

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Robert O'Callahan: An Inflection Point In The Evolution Of Programming Langauges

za, 15/07/2017 - 00:43

Two recent Rust-related papers are very exciting.

Rustbelt formalizes (a simplified version of) Rust's semantics and type system and provides a soundness proof that accounts for unsafe code. This is a very important step towards confidence in the soundness of safe Rust, and towards understanding what it means for unsafe code to be valid — and building tools to check that.

This systems paper is about exploiting Rust's remarkably strong control of aliasing to solve a few different OS-related problems.

It's not often you see a language genuinely attractive to the systems research community (and programmers in general, as the Rust community shows) being placed on a firm theoretical foundation. (It's pretty common to see programming languages being advocated to the systems community by their creators, but this is not that.) Whatever Rust's future may be, it is setting a benchmark against which future systems programming languages should be measured. Key Rust features — memory safety, data-race freedom, unique ownership, and minimal space/time overhead, justified by theory — should from now on be considered table stakes.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla Addons Blog: Add-ons Update – 2017/07

vr, 14/07/2017 - 22:30

Here’s the monthly update of the state of the add-ons world.

The Road to Firefox 57 explains what developers should look forward to in regards to add-on compatibility for the rest of the year. So please give it a read if you haven’t already.

The Review Queues

In the past month, our team reviewed 1,597 listed add-on submissions:

  • 1294 in fewer than 5 days (81%).
  • 110 between 5 and 10 days (7%).
  • 193 after more than 10 days (12%).

301 listed add-ons are awaiting review.

If you’re an add-on developer and are looking for contribution opportunities, please consider joining us. Visit our wiki page for more information.

Compatibility Update

We published the blog post for 55 and the bulk validation has been run. Additionally, the compatibility post for 56 is coming up.

Make sure you’ve tested your add-ons and either use WebExtensions or set the multiprocess compatible flag in your manifest. As always, we recommend that you test your add-ons on Beta.

If you’re an add-ons user, you can install the Add-on Compatibility Reporter. It helps you identify and report any add-ons that aren’t working anymore.

Recognition

We would like to thank the following people for their recent contributions to the add-ons world:

  • Aayush Sanghavi
  • Santiago Paez
  • Markus Strange
  • umaarabdullah
  • Ahmed Hasan
  • Fiona E Jannat
  • saintsebastian
  • Atique Ahmed
  • Apoorva Pandey
  • Cesar Carruitero
  • J.P. Rivera
  • Trishul Goel
  • Santosh
  • Christophe Villeneuve

You can read more about their work in our recognition page.

The post Add-ons Update – 2017/07 appeared first on Mozilla Add-ons Blog.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Hacks.Mozilla.Org: Introducing sphinx-js, a better way to document large JavaScript projects

vr, 14/07/2017 - 17:10

Until now, there has been no good tool for documenting large JavaScript projects. JSDoc, long the sole contender, has some nice properties:

  • A well-defined set of tags for describing common structures
  • Tooling like the Closure Compiler which hooks into those tags

But the output is always a mere alphabetical list of everything in your project. JSDoc scrambles up and flattens out your functions, leaving new users to infer their relationships and mentally sort them into comprehensible groups. While you can get away with this for tiny libraries, it fails badly for large ones like Fathom, which has complex new concepts to explain. What I wanted for Fathom’s manual was the ability to organize it logically, intersperse explanatory prose with extracted docs, and add entire sections which are nothing but conceptual overview and yet link into the rest of the work.1

The Python world has long favored Sphinx, a mature documentation tool with support for many languages and output formats, along with top-notch indexing, glossary generation, search, and cross-referencing. People have written entire books in it. Via plugins, it supports everything from Graphviz diagrams to YouTube videos. However, its JavaScript support has always lacked the ability to extract docs from code.

Now sphinx-js adds that ability, giving JavaScript developers the best of both worlds.

sphinx-js consumes standard JSDoc comments and tags—you don’t have to do anything weird to your source code. (In fact, it delegates the parsing and extraction to JSDoc itself, letting it weather future changes smoothly.) You just have Sphinx initialize a docs folder in the root of your project, activate sphinx-js as a plugin, and then write docs to your heart’s content using simple reStructuredText. When it comes time to call in some extracted documentation, you use one of sphinx-js’s special directives, modeled after the Python-centric autodoc’s mature example. The simplest looks like this:

.. autofunction:: linkDensity

That would go and find this function…

/** * Return the ratio of the inline text length of the links in an element to * the inline text length of the entire element. * * @param {Node} node - The node whose density to measure * @throws {EldritchHorrorError|BoredomError} If the expected laws of the * universe change, raise EldritchHorrorError. If we're getting bored of * said laws, raise BoredomError. * @returns {Number} A ratio of link length to overall text length: 0..1 */ function linkDensity(node) { ... }

…and spit out a nicely formatted block like this:

(the previous comment block, formatted nicely)

Sphinx begins to show its flexibility when you want to do something like adding a series of long examples. Rather than cluttering the source code around linkDensity, the additional material can live in the reStructuredText files that comprise your manual:

.. autofunction:: linkDensity Anything you type here will be appended to the function's description right after its return value. It's a great place for lengthy examples!

There is also a sphinx-js directive for classes, either the ECMAScript 2015 sugared variety or the classic functions-as-constructors kind decorated with @class. It can optionally iterate over class members, documenting as it goes. You can control ordering, turn private members on or off, or even include or exclude specific ones by name—all the well-thought-out corner cases Sphinx supports for Python code. Here’s a real-world example that shows a few truly public methods while hiding some framework-only “friend” ones:

.. autoclass:: Ruleset(rule[, rule, ...]) :members: against, rules

(Ruleset class with extracted documentation, including member functions)

Going beyond the well-established Python conventions, sphinx-js supports references to same-named JS entities that would otherwise collide: for example, one foo that is a static method on an object and another foo that is an instance method on the same. It does this using a variant of JSDoc’s namepaths. For example…

  • someObject#foo is the instance method.
  • someObject.foo is the static method.
  • And someObject~foo is an inner member, the third possible kind of overlapping thing.

Because JSDoc is still doing the analysis behind the scenes, we get to take advantage of its understanding of these JS intricacies.

Of course, JS is a language of heavy nesting, so things can get deep and dark in a hurry. Who wants to type this full path in order to document innerMember?

some/file.SomeClass#someInstanceMethod.staticMethod~innerMember

Yuck! Fortunately, sphinx-js indexes all such object paths using a suffix tree, so you can use any suffix that unambiguously refers to an object. You could likely say just innerMember. Or, if there were 2 objects called “innerMember” in your codebase, you could disambiguate by saying staticMethod~innerMember and so on, moving to the left until you have a unique hit. This delivers brevity and, as a bonus, saves you having to touch your docs as things move around your codebase.

With the maturity and power of Sphinx, backed by the ubiquitous syntactical conventions and proven analytic machinery of JSDoc, sphinx-js is an excellent way to document any large JS project. To get started, see the readme. Or, for a large-scale example, see the Fathom documentation. A particularly juicy page is the Rule and Ruleset Reference, which intersperses tutorial paragraphs with extracted class and function docs; its source code is available behind a link in its upper right, as for all such pages.

I look forward to your success stories and bug reports—and to the coming growth of rich, comprehensibly organized JS documentation!

1JSDoc has tutorials, but they are little more than single HTML pages. They have no particular ability to cross-link with the rest of the documentation nor to call in extracted comments.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Alessio Placitelli: Getting Firefox data faster: introducing the ‘new-profile’ ping

vr, 14/07/2017 - 15:13
Let me state this clearly, again: data latency sucks. This is especially true when working on Firefox: a nicely crafted piece of software that ships worldwide to many people. When something affects the experience of our users we need to know and react fast. The story so far… We started improving the latency of the … →
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Soledad Penades: If using ES6 `extends`, call `super()` before accessing `this`

vr, 14/07/2017 - 13:49

I am working on rewriting some code that used an ES5 “Class” helper, to use actual ES6 classes.

I soon stumbled upon a weird error in which apparently valid code would be throwing an |this| used uninitialized in A class constructor error:

class A extends B {
  constructor() {
    this.someVariable = 'some value'; // fails
  }
}

I was absolutely baffled as to why this was happening… until I found the answer in a stackoverflow post: I had to call super() before accessing this.

With that, the following works perfectly:

class A extends B {
  constructor() {
    super(); // ☜☜☜ ❗️❗️❗️
    this.someVariable = 'some value'; // works!
  }
}

Edit: filed a bug in Firefox to at least get a better error message!

flattr this!

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Dave Townsend: Thoughts on the module system

vr, 14/07/2017 - 00:06

For a long long time Mozilla has governed its code (and a few other things) as a series of modules. Each module covers an area of code in the source and has an owner and a list of peers, folks that are knowledgeable about that module. The full list of modules is public. In the early days the module system was everything. Module owners had almost complete freedom to evolve their module as they saw fit including choosing what features to implement and what bugs to fix. The folks who served as owners and peers came from diverse areas too. They weren’t just Mozilla employees, many were outside contributors.

Over time things have changed somewhat. Most of the decisions about what features to implement and many of the decisions about the priority of bugs to be fixed are now decided by the product management and user experience teams within Mozilla. Almost all of the module owners and most of the peers are now Mozilla employees. It might be time to think about whether the module system still works for Mozilla and if we should make any changes.

In my view the current module system provides two things that it’s worth talking about. A list of folks that are suitable reviewers for code and a path of escalation for when disagreements arise over how something should be implemented. Currently both are done on a per-module basis. The module owner is the escalation path, the module peers are reviewers for the module’s code.

The escalation path is probably something that should remain as-is. We’re always going to need experts to defer decisions to, those experts often need to be domain specific as they will need to understand the architecture of the code in question. Maintaining a set of modules with owners makes sense. But what about the peers for reviewing code?

A few years ago both the Toolkit and Firefox modules were split into sub-modules with peers for each sub-module. We were saying that we trusted folks to review some code but didn’t trust them to review other code. This frequently became a problem when code changes touched more than one sub-module, a developer would have to get review from multiple peers. That made reviews go slower than we liked. So we dropped the sub-modules. Instead every peer was trusted to review any code in the Firefox or Toolkit module. The one stipulation we gave the peers was that they should turn away reviews if they didn’t feel like they knew the code well enough to review it themselves. This change was a success. Of course for complicated work certain reviewers will always be more knowledgeable about a given area of code but for simpler fixes the number of available reviewers is much larger than it was otherwise.

I believe that we should make the same change for the entire code-base. Instead of having per-module peers simply designate every existing peer as a “Mozilla code reviewer” able to review code anywhere in the tree so long as they feel that they understand the change well enough. They should escalate architectural concerns to the module’s owner.

This does bring up the question of how do patch authors find reviewers for their code if there is just one massive list of reviewers. That is where Bugzilla’s suggested reviewers feature comes it. We have per-Bugzilla lists of reviewers who are the appropriate choices for that component. Patches that cover more than one component can choose whoever they like to do the review.

 

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

The Mozilla Blog: Defending Net Neutrality: Millions Rally to Save the Internet, Again

do, 13/07/2017 - 22:28

We’re fighting for net neutrality, again, because it is crucial to the future of the internet. Net neutrality serves to enable free speech, competition, innovation and user choice online.

On July 12, it was great to see such a diversity of voices speak up and join together to support a neutral internet. We need to protect the internet as a shared global public resource for us all. This Day of Action makes it clear, yet again, that net neutrality it a mainstream issue, which the majority of Americans (76% from our recent survey) care about and support.

We were happy to see a lot of engagement with our Day of Action activities:

  • Mozilla collected more than 30,000 public comments on July 12 alone — bringing our total number of public comments to more than 75,000. We’ll be sharing these with the FCC
  • Our nine hour Soothing Sounds of Activism: Net Neutrality video, along with interviews from Senators Al Franken and Ron Wyden, received tens of thousands of views
  • The net neutrality public comments displayed on the U.S. Firefox snippet made 6.8 million impressions
  • 30,000 listeners tuned in for the net neutrality episode of our IRL podcast

The Day of Action was timed a few days before the first deadline for comments to the FCC on the proposed rollback of existing net neutrality protections. This is just the first step though. Mozilla takes action to protect net neutrality every day, because it’s obviously not a one day battle.

Net neutrality is not the sole responsibility any one company, individual or political party. We need to join together because the fight for net neutrality impacts the future of the internet and everyone who uses it.

What’s Next?

Right now, we’re finishing our FCC comments to submit on July 17. Next, we’ll continue to advocate for enforceable net neutrality through all FCC deadlines and we’ll defend the open internet, just like we did with our comments and efforts to protect net neutrality in 2010 and 2014.

The post Defending Net Neutrality: Millions Rally to Save the Internet, Again appeared first on The Mozilla Blog.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

QMO: Firefox Developer Edition 55 Beta 11 Testday, July 21st

do, 13/07/2017 - 19:11

Hello Mozillians,

We are happy to let you know that Friday, July 21st, we are organizing Firefox Developer Edition 55 Beta 11 Testday. We’ll be focusing our testing on the following features: Screenshots, Shutdown Video Decoder and Customization.

Check out the detailed instructions via this etherpad.

No previous testing experience is required, so feel free to join us on #qa IRC channel where our moderators will offer you guidance and answer your questions.

Join us and help us make Firefox better!

See you on Friday!

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Air Mozilla: Reps Weekly Meeting Jul. 13, 2017

do, 13/07/2017 - 18:00

Reps Weekly Meeting Jul. 13, 2017 This is a weekly call with some of the Reps to discuss all matters about/affecting Reps and invite Reps to share their work with everyone.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

William Lachance: Taking over an npm package: sanity prevails

do, 13/07/2017 - 17:08

Sometimes problems are easier to solve than expected.

For the last few months I’ve been working on the front end of a new project called Mission Control, which aims to chart lots of interesting live information in something approximating realtime. Since this is a greenfield project, I thought it would make sense to use the currently-invogue framework at Mozilla (react) along with our standard visualization library, metricsgraphics.

Metricsgraphics is great, but its jquery-esque api is somewhat at odds with the react way. The obvious solution to this problem is to wrap its functionality in a react component, and a quick google search determined that several people have tried to do exactly that, the most popular one being one called (obviously) react-metrics-graphics. Unfortunately, it hadn’t been updated in quite some time and some pull requests (including ones implementing features I needed for my project) weren’t being responded to.

I expected this to be pretty difficult to resolve: I had no interaction with the author (Carter Feldman) before but based on my past experiences in free software, I was expecting stonewalling, leaving me no choice but to fork the package and give it a new name, a rather unsatisfying end result.

But, hey, let’s keep an open mind on this. What does google say about unmaintained npm packages? Oh what’s this? They actually have a policy?

tl;dr: You email the maintainer (politely) and CC support@npmjs.org about your interest in helping maintain the software. If you’re unable to come up with a resolution on your own, they will intervene.

So I tried that. It turns out that Carter was really happy to hear that Mozilla was interested in taking over maintenance of this project, and not only gave me permission to start publishing newer versions to npm, but even transferred his repository over to Mozilla (so we could preserve issue and PR history). The project’s new location is here:

https://github.com/mozilla/react-metrics-graphics

In hindsight, this is obviously the most reasonable outcome and I’m not sure why I was expecting anything else. Is the node community just friendlier than other areas I’ve worked in? Have community standards improved generally? In any case, thank you Carter for a great piece of software, hopefully it will thrive in its new home. :P

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Firefox UX: Firefox Workflow User Research in Germany

do, 13/07/2017 - 14:37
Munich Public Transit (Photo: Gemma Petrie)

Last year, the Firefox User Research team conducted a series of formative research projects studying multi-device task continuity. While these previous studies broadly investigated types of task flows and strategies for continuity across devices, they did not focus on the functionality, usability, or user goals behind these specific workflows.

For most users, interaction with browsers can be viewed as a series of specific, repeatable workflows. Within the the idea of a “workflow” is the theory of “flow.” Flow has been defined as:

a state of mind experienced by people who are deeply involved in an activity. For example, sometimes while surfing the Net, people become so focused on their pursuit that they lose track of time and temporarily forget about their surroundings and usual concerns…Flow has been described as an intrinsically enjoyable experience.¹

As new features and service integrations are introduced to existing products, there is a risk that unarticulated assumptions about usage context and user mental models could create obstacles for our users. Our goal for this research was to identify these obstacles and gain a detailed understanding of the behaviors, motivations, and strategies behind current browser-based user workflows and related device or app-based workflows. These insights will help us develop products, services, and features for our users.

Primary Research Questions
  • How can we understand users’ current behaviors to develop new workflows within the browser?
  • How do workflows & “flow” states differ between and among different devices?
  • In which current browser workflows do users encounter obstacles? What are these obstacles?
  • Are there types of workflows for specific types of users and their goals? What are they?
  • How are users’ unmet workflow needs being met outside of the browser? And how might we meet those needs in the browser?
Methodology

In order to understand users’ workflows, we employed a three-part, mixed method approach.

Survey

The first phase of our study was a twenty question survey deployed to 1,000 respondents in Germany provided by SSI’s standard international general population panel. We asked participants to select the Internet activities they had engaged in in the previous week. Participants were also asked questions about their browser usage on multiple devices as well as perceptions of privacy. We modeled this survey off of Pew Research Center’s “The Internet and Daily Life” study.

Experience Sampling

In the second phase, a separate group of 26 German participants were recruited from four major German cities: Cologne, Hamburg, Munich, and Leipzig. These participants represented a diverse range of demographic groups and half of the participants used Firefox as their primary browser on at least one of their devices. Participants were asked to download a mobile app called Paco. Paco cued participants up to seven times daily asking them about their current Internet activities, the context for it, and their mental state while completing it.

In-Person Interviews

In the final phase of the study, we selected 11 of the participants from the Experience Sampling segment from Hamburg, Munich, and Leipzig. Over the course of 3 weeks, we visited these participants in their homes and conducted 90 minute interview and observation sessions. Based on the survey results and experience sampling observations, we explored a small set of participants’ workflows in detail.

Product Managers participating in affinity diagramming in the Mozilla Toronto office. (Photo: Gemma Petrie)Field Team Participation

The Firefox User Research team believes it is important to involve a wide variety of staff members in the experience of in-context research and analysis activities. Members of the Firefox product management and UX design teams accompanied the research team for these in-home interviews in Germany. After the interviews, the whole team met in Toronto for a week to absorb and analyze the data collected from the three segments. The results presented here are based on the analysis provided by the team.

Workflows

Based on our research, we define a workflow as a habitual, frequently employed set of discrete steps that users build into a larger activity. Users employ the tools they have at hand (e.g., tabs, bookmarks, screenshots) to achieve a goal. Workflows can also span across multiple devices, range from simple to technically sophisticated, exist across noncontinuous durations of time, and contain multiple decisions within them.

Example Workflow from Hamburg Participant #2

We observed that workflows appear to be naturally constructed actions to participants. Their workflows were so unconscious or self-evident, that participants often found it challenging to articulate and reconstruct their workflows. Examples of workflows include: Comparison shopping, checking email, checking news updates, and sharing an image with someone else.

Workflows Model

Based on our study, we have developed a general two-part model to illustrate a workflow.

Part 1: Workflows are constructed from discrete steps. These steps are atomic and include actions like typing in a URL, pressing a button, taking a screenshot, sending a text message, saving a bookmark, etc. We mean “atomic” in the sense that the steps are simple, irreducible actions in the browser or other software tools. When employed alone, these actions can achieve a simple result (e.g. creating a bookmark). Users build up the atomic actions into larger actions that constitute a workflow.

Part 2: Outside factors can influence the choices users make for both a whole workflow or steps within a workflow. These factors include software components, physical components, and pyscho/social/cultural factors.

Trying to find the Mozilla Berlin office. (Photo: Gemma Petrie)Factors Influencing Workflows

While workflows are composed from atomic building blocks of tools, there is a great deal more that influences their construction and adoption among users.

Software Components

Software components are features of the operating system, the browser, and the specs of web technology that allow users to complete small atomic tasks. Some software components also constrain users into limited tasks or are obstacles to some workflows.

The basic building blocks of the browser are the features, tools, and preferences that allow users to complete tasks with the browser. Some examples include: Tabs, bookmarks, screenshots, authentication, and notifications.

Physical Components

Physical components are the devices and technology infrastructure that inform how users interact with software and the Internet. These components employ software but it is users’ physical interaction with them that makes these factors distinct. Some examples include: Access to the internet, network availability, and device form factors.

Psycho/Social/Cultural Factors

Psycho/Social/Cultural influences are contextual, social, and cognitive factors that affect users’ approaches to and decisions about their workflows.

Memory
Participants use memory to fill in gaps in their workflows where technology does not support persistence. For example, when comparison shopping, a user has multiple tabs open to compare prices; the user is using memory to keep in mind prices from the other tabs for the same item.

Control
Participants exercised control over the role of technology in their lives either actively or passively. For example, some participant believed that they received too many notifications from apps and services, and often did not understand how to change these settings. This experience eroded their sense of control over their technology and forced these participants to develop alternate strategies for regaining control over these interruptions. For others, notifications were seen as a benefit. For example, one of our Leipzig participants used home automation tools and their associated notifications on his mobile devices to give him more control over his home environment.

Other examples of psycho/social/cultural factors we observed included: Work/personal divides, identity management, fashion trends in technology adoption, and privacy concerns.

Using the Workflows Model

When analyzing current user workflows, the parts of the model should be cues to examine how the workflow is constructed and what factors influence its construction. When building new features, it can be helpful to ask the following questions to determine viability:

  • Are the steps we are creating truly atomic and usable in multiple workflows?
  • Are we supplying software components that give flexibility to a workflow?
  • What affect will physical factors have on the atomic components in the workflow?
  • How do psycho-social-cultural factors influence users’ choices about the components they are using in the workflow?
Hamburg Train Station (Photo: Gemma Petrie)Design Principles & Recommendations
  • New features should be atomic elements, not complete user workflows.
  • Don’t be prescriptive, but facilitate efficiency.
  • Give users the tools to build their own workflows.
  • While software and physical components are important, psycho/social/cultural factors are equally as important and influential over users’ workflow decisions.
  • Make it easy for users to actively control notifications and other flow disruptors.
  • Leverage online content to support and improve offline experiences.
  • Help users bridge the gap between primary-device workflows and secondary devices.
  • Make it easy for users to manage a variety of identities across various devices and services.
  • Help users manage memory gaps related to revisiting and curating saved content.
Future Research Phases

The Firefox User Research team conducted additional phases of this research in Canada, the United States, Japan, and Vietnam. Check back for updates on our work.

References:

¹ Pace, S. (2004). A grounded theory of the flow experiences of Web users. International journal of human-computer studies, 60(3), 327–363.

Firefox Workflow User Research in Germany was originally published in Firefox User Experience on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Air Mozilla: The Joy of Coding - Episode 105

wo, 12/07/2017 - 19:00

The Joy of Coding - Episode 105 mconley livehacks on real Firefox bugs while thinking aloud.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Chris H-C: Latency Improvements, or, Yet Another Satisfying Graph

wo, 12/07/2017 - 18:33

This is the third in my ongoing series of posts containing satisfying graphs.

Today’s feature: a plot of the mean and 95th percentile submission delays of “main” pings received by Firefox Telemetry from users running Firefox Beta.

Screenshot-2017-7-12 Beta _Main_ Ping Submission Delay in hours (mean, 95th %ile)

We went from receiving 95% of pings after about, say, 130 hours (or 5.5 days) down to getting them within about 55 hours (2 days and change). And the numbers will continue to fall as more beta users get the modern beta builds with lower latency ping sending thanks to pingsender.

What does this mean? This means that you should no longer have to wait a week to get a decently-rigorous count of data that comes in via “main” pings (which is most of our data). Instead, you only have to wait a couple of days.

Some teams were using the rule-of-thumb of ten (10) days before counting anything that came in from “main” pings. We should be able to reduce that significantly.

How significantly? Time, and data, will tell. This quarter I’m looking into what guarantees we might be able to extend about our data quality, which includes timeliness… so stay tuned.

For a more rigorous take on this, partake in any of dexter’s recent reports on RTMO. He’s been tracking the latency improvements and possible increases in duplicate ping rates as these changes have ridden the trains towards release. He’s blogged about it if you want all the rigour but none of Python.

:chutten

FINE PRINT: Yes, due to how these graphs work they will always look better towards the end because the really delayed stuff hasn’t reached us yet. However, even by the standards of the pre-pingsender mean and 95th percentiles we are far enough after the massive improvement for it to be exceedingly unlikely to change much as more data is received. By the post-pingsender standards, it is almost impossible. So there.

FINER PRINT: These figures include adjustments for client clocks having skewed relative to server clocks. Time is a really hard problem when even on a single computer and trying to reconcile it between many computers separated by oceans both literal and metaphorical is the subject of several dissertations and, likely, therapy sessions. As I mentioned above, for rigour and detail about this and other aspects, see RTMO.


Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Air Mozilla: Weekly SUMO Community Meeting July 12, 2017

wo, 12/07/2017 - 18:00

Weekly SUMO Community Meeting July 12, 2017 This is the sumo weekly call

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla Open Innovation Team: Reflection — Inclusive Organizing for Open Source Communities

di, 11/07/2017 - 15:08

This, the second in a series of posts reporting findings from three months of research into the state of D&I in Mozilla’s communities. The current state of our communities is a mix, when it comes to inclusivity: we can do better, and this blog post is an effort to be transparent about what we’ve learned in working toward that goal.

If we are to truly unleash the full value of a participatory, open Mozilla, we need to personalize and humanize Mozilla’s value by designing diversity and inclusion into our strategy. To unlock the full potential of an open innovation model we need radical change in how we develop community and who we include.Photo credit: national museum of american history via VisualHunt.com / CC BY-NC

We learned that while bottom-up, or grassroots organizing enables ideas and vision to surface within Mozilla, those who succeed in that environment tend to be of the same backgrounds, usually the more dominant or privileged background, and often in tenured* community roles.

*tenured — Roles assigned by Mozilla, or legacy to the community that exist without timelines, or cycles for renewal/election.

Our research dove into many areas of inclusive organizing, and three clusters of recommendations surfaced:

1. Provide Organizational Support to Identity Groups

For a diversity of reasons including, safety, friendship, mentorship, advocacy and empowerment — identity groups serve both as a safe space, and as a springboard into, and out of greater community participation — for the betterment of both. Those in Mozilla’s Tech Speakers program, spoke very positively of the opportunity, responsibility and camaraderie provided by this program, which brings together contributors focused on building speaking skills for conferences.

Building a sense of belonging in small groups, no matter focus (Tech Speakers, Women of Color, Spanish Speaking), is an inclusion methodology.” — Non-Binary contributor, Europe

Womoz (Women of Mozilla) showed up in our research an example of an identity group trying to solve and overcome systemic problems faced by women in open source. However, without centralized goals or structured organizational support for the program, communities were left on their own to define the group, its goals, who is included, and why. As a result we found vastly different perspectives, and implementations of ‘Womoz’, from successful inclusion methodologies to exclusive or even relegatory groups:

  • As a ‘label’. ‘Catch-all’ for non- male non-binary contributors.
  • A way for women to gather that aligns with cultural traditions for convening of young women — and approved by families within specific cultural norms.
  • A safe, and empowered way to meet and talk with people of the same gender-identity about topics and problems specific to women.
  • A way to escape toxic communities where discussion and opportunity is dominated by men, or where women were purposely excluded.
  • An online community with several different channels for sharing advocacy (mailing list, Telegram group, website, wiki page).
  • As a stereotypical way to reference women-only contributing in specific areas (such as crafts, non-technical) or relegating women to those areas.

For identity groups to fully flourish and to avoid negative manifestations like tokenism and relegation, the recommendation is that organizational support (dedicated strategic planning, staffing, time, and resources) should be prioritized where leadership and momentum exists, and where diversity can thrive. Mozilla is already investing in pilot for identity with staff and core contributors which is exciting progress on what we’ve learned. The full potential is that identity groups act as ‘diversity launch pads’ into and out of the larger community for benefit of both.

2. Build Project-Wide Strategies for Toxic BehaviorPhoto by Paul Riismandel BY-NC-SA 2.0

Research exposed toxic behavior as a systemic issue being tackled in many different ways, and by both employees and community leaders truly dedicated to creating healthy communities.

Insights amplified external findings into toxic behavior, that shows toxic people tend to be highly productive thus masking the true impact of their behavior which deters, and excludes large numbers of people. Furthermore, the perceived value or reliance on the work of toxic individuals and regional communities was suspected to complicate, or deter and dilute intervention effectiveness.

Within in this finding we have three recommendations:

  1. Develop regionally-Specific strategies for community organizing. Global regions with laws and cultural norms that exclude, or limit opportunity to women and other marginalized groups demonstrate the challenge of a global-approach to open source community health. Generally, we found that those groups with cultural and economic privilege within a given local context were also the majority of the people who succeeded in participation. Where toxic communities, and individuals exist, the disproportionate representation of diverse groups was magnified to the point where standard approaches to community health were not successful. Specialized strategies might be very different per region, but with investment can amplify the potential of marginalized people within.
  2. Create an organization-wide strategy for tracking decisions, and outcomes of Community Participation Guidelines violations. While some project and project maintainers have been successful in banning and managing toxic behavior, there is no central mechanism for tracking those decisions for the benefit of others who may encounter and be faced with similar decisions, or the same people. We learned of at least one case where a banned toxic contributor surfaced in another area of the project without the knowledge of that team. Efforts in this vein including recent revisions to the guidelines and current efforts to train community leaders and build a central mechanism need to be continued and expanded.
  3. Build team strategies for managing conflict and toxic behavior. A range of approaches to community health surfaced success, and struggle managing conflict, and toxic behavior within projects, and community events. What appears to be important in successful moderation and resolution is that within project-teams there are designed specific roles, with training, accountability and transparency.
3. Develop Inclusive Community Leadership Models

In qualitative interviews and data analysis, ‘gatekeeping* showed up as one of the greatest blockers for diversity in communities.

Characteristics of gatekeeping in Mozilla’s communities included withholding opportunity and recognition (like vouching), purposeful exclusion, delay of, or limiting language translation of opportunity, and well as lying about the availability or existence of leadership roles, and event invitations/applications. We also heard a lot about nepotism, as well as both passive and deliberate banishment of individuals — especially women, who showed a sharp decrease in participation over time compared with men.

*Gatekeeping is noted as only one reason participation for women decreased, and we will expand on that in other posts.

Much of this data reinforced what we know about the myth of meritocracy, and that despite its promise, meritocracy actually enables toxic, exclusionary norms that prevent development of resilient, diverse communities.

“New people are not really welcomed, they are not given a lot of information on purpose.” (male contributor, South America)

As a result of these findings, we recommend all community leadership roles be designed with accountability for community health, inclusion and surfacing the achievement of others as core function. Furthermore, renewable cycles for community roles should be required, with designed challenges (like elections) for terms that extend beyond one year, with outreach to diverse groups for participation.

The long-term goal is that leadership begins a cultural shift in community that radiates empowerment for diverse groups who might not otherwise engage.

Our next post in this series ‘We See you — Reaching Diverse Audiences in FOSS’, will be published on July 21st. Until then, check out ‘Increasing Rusts Reach an initiative that emerged from a design sprint focused on this research.

Reflection — Inclusive Organizing for Open Source Communities was originally published in Mozilla Open Innovation on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

The Mozilla Blog: Mozilla Fully Paid Parental Leave Program Officially Rolls Out Worldwide

di, 11/07/2017 - 14:59

For most countries around the world, school is out, and parents are reconnecting with their kids to enjoy road trips and long days. Many of our Mozilla employees have benefited from the expanded parental leave program we introduced last year to spend quality time with their families. The program offers childbearing parents up to 26 weeks of fully paid leave and non-childbearing (foster and adoptive parents, partners of childbearing) parents up to 12 weeks of fully paid leave.

This July, we completed the global roll out of the program making Mozilla a leader in the tech industry and among organizations with a worldwide employee base.

What makes Mozilla’s parental leave program unique

And sets us apart from other tech companies and other organizations:

  • 2016 Lookback: A benefit for employees who welcomed a child in the calendar year prior to the expanded benefit being rolled out.
  • Global Benefit: As a US-based company with employees all over the world, we chose to offer it to employees around the world — US, Canada, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, UK, Australia, New Zealand, Taiwan.
  • Fully Paid Leave: For all parents, they’ll receive their full salary during that time.
What our Mozilla employees have to say:

“Our second son was born in January 2017. When I heard about the new policy that Mozilla will launch globally one month before, I first was not sure how that will work out with the statutory parental leave rules in Germany. But I have to say that I first enjoyed working with Rachel to work out all the details — and now I get enjoy a summer with my family. The second child has changed my life completely, it was hard to match work and family needs. I am grateful that I will have time to give back to my son and my family and grow even more closer together.”  Dominik Strohmeier, based in Berlin, Germany.  Two children, with second child born in 2017.

Chelsea Novak with baby

“Our daughter was born in 2016,” says Chelsea Novak, Firefox Editorial Lead. “When Mozilla announced this new parental leave policy we were excited for parents that were expecting in 2017, but a little sad that we missed out. Having Mozilla extend these new parental leave benefits to us was very generous and gave us some precious time with our family that we weren’t expecting.”  Chelsea and Matej Novak, both longtime Canadian Mozilla employees, based in Toronto. Two children, ages 1 and 3.

 

 

 

“I started with Mozilla in the beginning of 2016, and delivered my child that same year. When I first heard of the policy, I didn’t think the new parental leave would apply to me. Then, Rachel told me the good news. I was amazed that they would extend the parental leave policy to me so that I can take additional time off in 2017.  Mozilla is so generous to parents like myself to enjoy special moments like watching my daughter take her first steps or saying her first words.”   Jen Boscacci, based in Mountain View, California.  Two children, with second child born in 2016.

 

Maura Tuohy with baby

“Being able to take advantage of the 26 weeks of leave — and have the flexibility of when to take it — was an incredible gift for our family. Knowing that the company was so supportive made the experience as stress free as having a newborn can be! I’m so grateful to work for such a progressive and kind company — not just in policies but in culture and practice.”  Maura Tuohy, based in San Francisco.  Her first child was born in 2017.

 

 

This program helps us embrace and celebrate families of all kinds, whether its adoption and foster care, we expanded our support for both childbearing and non-childbearing parents, independent of gender or situation. We value our Mozilla employees, because juggling between work and family responsibilities is no easy feat.

The post Mozilla Fully Paid Parental Leave Program Officially Rolls Out Worldwide appeared first on The Mozilla Blog.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Shing Lyu: Install Ubuntu 16.04 on ThinkPad 13 (2nd Gen)

di, 11/07/2017 - 09:48

It has been a while since my last post. I’ve been busy for the first half of this year but now I got more free time. Hopefully I can get back to my usual pace of one post per months.

My old laptop (Inhon Carbonbook, discontinued) had a swollen battery. I kept using it for a few months but then the battery squeezed my keyboard so I can no longer type correctly. After some research I decided to buy the ThinkPad 13 model because it provides descent hardware for its price, and the weight (~1.5 kg) is acceptable. Every time I got a new computer the first thing is to get Linux up and running. So here are my notes on how to install Ubuntu Linux on it.

TL;DR: Everything works out of the box. Just remember to turn off secure boot and shrink the disk in Windows before you install.

Some assumptions Before Installing Ubuntu

First we need to clean up some disk space for Ubuntu. But if you are going to delete Windows completely you can skip the following steps.

  • (In Windows) Right click on the start menu, select “PowerShell (administrator)”, then run diskmgmt.msc.
  • Right click the C: disk and select the shrink disk option.

Before we can install Ubuntu, we need to disable the secure boot feature in BIOS.

  • Press Shift+restart to be able to get into BIOS, otherwise you’ll keep booting into Windows.
  • Press Enter followed by F1 to go into BIOS during boot.
  • Disable Secure Boot.

BIOS secure_boot secure_boot_sub_menu

UEFI boot seems to work with Ubuntu 16.04’s installer, so you can keep all the UEFI options enabled in the BIOS. Download the Ubuntu installation disk and use a bootable USD disk creator that supports UEFI, for example Rufus.

Installing Ubuntu

Installing Ubuntu should be pretty straightforward if you’ve done it before.

  • Go to BIOS again and set the USB drive as top priority boot medium.
  • Boot into Ubuntu, select “Install Ubuntu”.
  • Follow the installer wizard.
  • Select “Something else” when asked how to partition the disk.
  • Create a linux-swap partition of 4GB for 8GB of RAM. I followed Redhat’s suggestion, but there are different theories out there, so use your own judgement here.
  • Create a EXT4 main disk and set the mount point to /
  • After the installer finished, reboot. You should see the GRUB2 menu. The Windows options should also work without trouble.

GRUB2

What works?

Almost everything works out of the box. All the media keys, like volume control, brightness and WiFi and Bluetooth toggle is recognized by the built-in Unity desktop. But I am using i3 so I have to set them up myself, more on this later. The USB Type-C port is a nice surprise for me. It supports charging, so you can charge with any Type-C charger. I tested Apple’s Macbook charger and it works well. I also tested Apple’s and Dell’s Type-C multi-port adapter and both works, so I can plug my external monitor and my keyboard/mouse to it so it works like a docking station.

media_key

A side note, I’m also glad to find that Ubuntu now use the Fcitx IME by default. Most of the IME bugs I found in previous versions and ibus are now gone.

What doesn’t work?

Not that I’m aware of. The only complaint I have is that the Ethernet and Wi-Fi naming method has changed somehow (e.g. enp0s31f6 instead of eth0). But I believe that is something we can fix by software. People also complain that the power button and the hinge is not very sturdy. But I guess that’s the compromise you have to make for the relatively cheap price.

power_button

More on setting up media keys for i3 window manager

Since I use the i3 window manager, I don’t have Unity to handling all my media keys’ functionality. But it’s not hard to set them up using the following i3 config:

bindsym XF86AudioRaiseVolume exec amixer -q set Master 2dB+ unmute bindsym XF86AudioLowerVolume exec amixer -q set Master 2dB- unmute bindsym XF86AudioMute exec amixer -D pulse set Master toggle # Must assign device "pulse" to successfully unmute # Only two level of brightness bindsym XF86MonBrightnessUp exec xrandr --ouptut eDP-1 --brightness 0.8 bindsym XF86MonBrightnessDown exec xrandr --ouptut eDP-1 --brightness 0.5

The only drawback is that the LED indicator on the mute buttons mighty be out of sync with the real software state.

Conclusion

Overall, ThinkPad 13 is a descent laptop for its price range. Ubuntu 16.04 works out of the box. No sweat! If you are looking for a good Linux laptop, but can’t afford ThinkPad X1 Carbon or Dell’s XPS 13/15, ThinkPad 13 might be a good choice.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Pagina's