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Gervase Markham: Top 50 DOS Problems Solved: Shrinking Hard Disk

Mozilla planet - do, 26/03/2015 - 16:56

Q: My hard disk seems to be getting smaller! There is a megabyte less free space than there was a month ago, yet I have not saved anywhere near 1MB’s worth of files. What’s going on?

A: This is quite a common problem, but most sufferers don’t realise they’ve got it. What happens is that some of the free space gets allocated to a non-existent file.

In other words the disk filing system has, in your case, a megabyte allocated to one or more files that don’t have a directory entry. They cannot therefore be seen with the DIR command, nor deleted.

Fortunately it is possible to turn these lost chains, as they are called, back into real files which can then be seen and deleted in the normal way. Simply type this command:

CHKDSK /F

If you have any lost chains, Chkdsk will tell you so and ask you if you want to convert them into files. Answer ‘Y’.

FILE0000.CHK, FILE0001.CHK, FILE0002.CHK…

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla Science Lab: Ask Us Anything: Lessons from the Local Research Coding Groups Panel Discussion

Mozilla planet - do, 26/03/2015 - 16:00

On Tuesday, the the Science Lab conducted its first Ask Us Anything on the MSL Forum, organized by Noam Ross. The topic was lessons learned in running local study groups, user’s groups, hacky hours and other meetups for researchers using and writing code; many thanks go out to the seven panelists who were available to answer questions:

This was a tremendously successful event, with a sustained conversation of more than a post per minute on the topic for two full hours; a lot of interesting ideas came out of the discussion, a few of which I summarize here, followed by detailed discussion below; also, be sure to check out the full thread.

Summary

A few great ideas for study groups can be distilled from this event:

  • Get your event information in front of a few hundred people regularly; 10% attendance is normal.
  • Involve your institution in communicating about your event if possible.
  • Always have an exit strategy: how will you pass the baton to the next cohort of organizers?

And for online AMA-style events:

  • Make it a panel discussion; this creates the space for the community to ask questions, but keeps the thread lively and substantial with discussions between experienced community members.
  • Make it a time-limited event; this encourages active participation and re-creates some of the energy usually found only at conferences and in-person meetups.
Sticking Power

One of the first things the thread discussed, was one of the most common problems for any regular community event: sustainability. How do we get people coming out and participating, month after month, and maintain momentum?

The panel quickly zeroed in on an interesting challenge: will interest be inspired and sustained by highly targeted skills and tools trainings, or will keeping things as general as possible appeal to a wide audience? Highly specific material will be the most attractive to the small group of people already interested in it, while general topics might seem vague or unclear to a potential attendee on how relevant they’ll be, even if they, in principle, apply to a wider range of people.

This led to an important observation: the bigger the pool of people a study group is communicating with, the better its attendance will be. Panelists seemed to have a bit more success with the specific and clearly practically applicable; what allowed these groups to keep attendance up despite getting into the nitty gritty, was developing a large audience of people aware of their activities. Numbers seemed to hover around 10% attendance, if we compare number of actual attendees to size of mailing lists; but with a large audience (critical mass seemed to be around 200 people), there’s sure to be a cohort of people interested in whichever specific topic the group wants to take up.

But what about the early days, before a new group has gotten in front of that first 200? Fiona and Jeff made a key observation: stick to it, even if the first couple of events are just you and one or two other people. It takes time for word of mouth to spread, time for people to make up their minds that they’re comfortable dipping their toe into something like a meetup group – and, worst case, you’ve set aside some time to get some of your own work done and have a beer.

Finally on the topic of sustainability, another common concern that came up was the relationship of organizers to the host institution; post-docs and students move on after only a few short years, and without someone to pick up the torch, efforts can fizzle out. The panel agreed that it’s crucial for senior organizers to cultivate relationships with people who they can hand off to in future, but this calls out another key design question: how can we design a really smooth hand-off procedure between generations of organizers? This is a long term goal a bit beyond the concerns of groups just getting started, but I think with some savvy design, this process can be made quite smooth; more of my own ideas on this will be forthcoming on this blog very soon.

Communication

We need that pool of 200 people thinking about our event – how do we assemble them to begin with?

Organizers found, perhaps surprisingly, that their attendees were pretty quiet on Twitter, and didn’t generate much conversation there, although Twitter might be more effective as a ‘push’ platform, to let people know about events and content. More successful were blogs and mailing lists; panelists cited the familiarity of these formats to most researchers.

A novel approach that a few of the groups based at universities took, was to approach departments for inclusion in departmental news letters and welcome packages for new students. Not only do these communication channels typically already exist in most institutions, they can put a group in front of a large number of potentially interested people quickly, and lend a degree of inclusion into the establishment that helps catch peoples’ attention.

Novel Ideas

One thing I love about getting a bunch of people together to talk, is that novel ideas always come out. One of my favorites was a whole other flavor of event that a study group could put on; Fiona Tweedie described ‘Research Speed Dating’, an event where a bunch of people set up short demos of tools they use in their research, and attendees circulate among them, exploring the tools in short, five-minute introductions to see if they might be interested in looking deeper into them at a future meetup. Topics that garner a lot of interest are chosen for deeper dives at future events, and prospective participants get to meet organizers and start developing connections in a relatively no-pressure atmosphere.

Another observation I found compelling from the discussion came from Rayna Harris – graduate school often involves working on the same project for years, and the singular focus can be maddening after a while. It’s really refreshing to have a project that comes in little, month-long bites; from announcing a meetup to delivering can easily occupy only a few weeks, giving a sense of delivery and completion on a much faster cadence than research naturally provides.

Meta-AMA

A number of people also asked me about the AMA format itself; I think it was a big success, and it was largely thanks to some design decisions Noam Ross made when we were setting this event up:

  • Have a panel of people to discuss the topic at hand. This worked very well, since even when there weren’t newcomers to ask questions, the panelists all talked amongst themselves, which led to some really deep and insightful questions and answers from old hands in the space. We had a seven-person panel, and everyone participated and seemed heard.
  • Put it all on one thread. I admit, I had some misgivings about having seven parallel conversations in one thread. It was about as chaotic as I imagined, but Noam was right, it was actually a good thing; it enhanced the panel’s ability to interact and make this as much a panel discussion as an AMA – call it an open panel discussion.

A remarkable thing about this event, was that the same sort of skill and knowledge sharing that happens so naturally at a conference and that I’ve been trying to produce online came out in this event; by sitting a half dozen people down around a topic in a finite time window (we did two hours and it didn’t drag at all), the same sort of connections and mutual understanding came out.

Conclusion

A number of interesting ideas, metrics and goals for study groups came out of this conversation, which we’ll be folding in to our forthcoming support for setting up your own meetup – watch this space for news and opportunities in that project coming very soon, and in the meantime, make sure your local study group is on the map!

Map of Study Groups & Hacky Hours

Given what a great time and what a productive discussion everyone had on the forum on Tuesday, I’m looking forward to making these panel AMAs a regular event at the Lab; if you have a topic you’d like to suggest, post it in the Events section of the forum, or tweet it to us at @MozillaScience and @billdoesphysics. I hope you’ll join us!

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla Release Management Team: Firefox 37 beta7 to rc

Mozilla planet - do, 26/03/2015 - 09:06

Due to the short cycle (5 weeks instead of 6), we landed more changes than we used to in the RC build.

We took some stability fixes for graphic issues.

  • 22 changesets
  • 229 files changed
  • 724 insertions
  • 4356 deletions

ExtensionOccurrences h17 cpp17 ini7 py3 list2 js2 html2 sh1 json1 ipdlh1 hgtags1 build1

ModuleOccurrences storage17 dom14 mobile12 gfx8 widget4 testing3 layout3 docshell2 security1 editor1 browser1

List of changesets:

Chris ManchesterBug 1145444. r=jmaher, a=test-only - 1efc8c39543c Jeff GilbertBug 1143218 - Use mochitest subsuites to specify webgl tests. r=jmaher, r=gbrown, a=test-only - a58b8b594396 Kyle HueyBug 1145870. r=bz, a=lmandel - 0725e4cfa3c3 CykesiopkaBug 1121117 - Add fuzz time to workaround non-monotonicity of Date(). r=keeler, a=test-only - 8358c6c2c417 Tim TaubertBug 1088163 - Fix intermittent browser_offlineQuotaNotification.js timeouts by properly waiting for a notification to show. r=markh, a=test-only - 72912a71fb98 Ehsan AkhgariBug 1142360 - Move the mochitests for bugs 441782, 467672 and 570378 to the reftest framework. r=dbaron, a=test-only - 62a72d33d16b Neil DeakinBug 942411 - Change the frame height to force a reflow and renable the test on Linux to see if it helps. r=smaug, a=test-only - b8ec30b0a437 James WillcoxBug 1090300 - Repopulate input buffers when necessary in Android media decoder. r=gcp, a=lmandel - 2cca5b090036 Ryan VanderMeulenBug 1146061 - Skip test_peerConnection_basicH264Video.html on Windows debug. a=test-only - 19b630388dda Ryan VanderMeulenBacked out changeset 72912a71fb98 (Bug 1088163) because it depends on BrowserTestUtils, which isn't available on 37. - 196c6575593d Matt WoodrowBacked out changeset 0c23dcbc6bf7 (Bug 1138967) for causing crashes - 6d7a2555b021 Matt WoodrowBacked out changeset 0c23dcbc6bf7 (Bug 1138967) for causing crashes. CLOSED TREE - 2592523e1eb0 Olli PettayBug 1146339 - Do anchor scrolling right before dispatching popstate/hashchange. r=bz, a=lmandel - 4d306a83ae1b Marco BonardoBug 1005991 - mozStorage should not use XPCVariant off the main thread. r=asuth, a=lmandel - b8c1a399905d Marco BonardoBug 1005991 - Trivial fixes for non-unified builds. r=me, a=lmandel - fadc9f270e9f Ryan VanderMeulenMerge beta to m-r. a=merge - 07c827be741f Steven MichaudBug 1137229 - Keyboard input can stop working in a window. r=smaug a=lmandel CLOSED TREE - 45961b7d67dc Shih-Chiang ChienBug 1080130 - Unreferenced socket might be closed before opened. r=khuey, a=test-only - b6a4dca0edc9 Jeff MuizelaarBug 1137716 - Try blacklisting Optimus w/ Intel Ironlake Graphics. r=bas, a=lmandel - d56b6d648c01 Matt WoodrowBug 1145585 - Hold a ref to the right texture. r=jmuizelaar, a=lmandel - e35deaa85d21 Ehsan AkhgariBug 1146883 - Null check the node passed to GetGoodSelPointForNode. r=smaug, a=lmandel - 8fda35675a3f Ryan VanderMeulenMerge beta to m-r. a=merge - 7ec23d08cf32

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Karl Dubost: Refresh HTTP Header

Mozilla planet - do, 26/03/2015 - 08:25

Through discussions on whatwg, I learned (or I had just forgotten) about the Refresh HTTP header. Let's cut strait to the syntax:

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Refresh: 5; url=http://www.example.org/fresh-as-a-summer-breeze

where

  • 5 means here 5 seconds.
  • url= gives the destination where the client should head after 5 seconds.

Simon Pieters (Opera) is saying in that mail:

I think Refresh as an HTTP header is not specified anywhere, so per spec
it shouldn't work. However I think browsers all support it, so it would be
good to specify it.

Eric Law (ex-Microsoft) has written about The Performance Impact of META REFRESH. If we express the previous HTTP header in HTML, we get:

<meta http-equiv="refresh" content="5;url=http://www.example.org/fresh-as-a-summer-breeze" />

In his blog post, Eric is talking about people using refresh to… well refresh the page. He means loading the same exact page over and over again. And indeed it means for the browser to create a certain number of "unconditional and conditional HTTP requests to revalidate the page’s resources" for each reload (refresh).

On the Web Compatibility side of things, I see the <meta http-equiv="refresh" …/> used quite often.

<meta http-equiv="refresh" content="0;url=http://example.com/there" />

Note the 0. Probably the result of sysadmins not willing to touch the configuration of the servers, and so front-end developers taking the lead to "fix it", instead of using HTTP 302 or HTTP 301. Anyway, it is something which is being used for most of the time, redirecting to another domain name or uri. Refresh HTTP Header on the other hand, I don't remember seeing it that often.

Should it be documented?

Simon is saying: "it would be good to specify it." I'm not so sure. First things first.

Testing

Let's create a test, by making a page sending a Refresh.

Header set Refresh "0;url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sTJ1XwGDcA4"

which gives

HTTP/1.1 200 OK Accept-Ranges: bytes Connection: Keep-Alive Content-Length: 200 Content-Type: text/html; charset=utf-8 Date: Thu, 26 Mar 2015 05:48:57 GMT ETag: "c8-5122a67ec0240" Expires: Thu, 02 Apr 2015 05:48:57 GMT Keep-Alive: timeout=5, max=100 Last-Modified: Thu, 26 Mar 2015 05:37:05 GMT Refresh: 0;url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sTJ1XwGDcA4

This should redirect to this Fresh page

  • Yes - Firefox 36.0.4
  • Yes - Opera 29.0.1795.26
  • Yes - Safari 8.0.4 (10600.4.10.7)

If someone could test for IE and Chrome at least.

Browser Bugs?

On Mozilla bug tracker, there are a certain number of bugs around refresh. This bug about inline resources is quite interesting and might indeed need to be addressed if there was a documentation. The bug is what the browser should do when the Refresh HTTP header is on an image included in a Web page (this could be another test). For now, the refresh is not done for inline resources. Then what about scripts, stylesheets, JSON files, HTML document in iframes, etc? For the SetupRefreshURIFromHeader code, there are Web Compatibility hacks in the source code of Firefox. We can read:

// Also note that the seconds and URL separator can be either // a ';' or a ','. The ',' separator should be illegal but CNN // is using it."

also:

// Note that URI should start with "url=" but we allow omission

and… spaces!

// We've had at least one whitespace so tolerate the mistake // and drop through. // e.g. content="10 foo"

Good times…

On Webkit bug tracker, I found another couple of bugs but about meta refresh and not specifically Refresh:. But I'm not sure it's handled by WebCore or if it's handled elsewhere in MacOSX (NSURLRequest, NSURLConnection, …). If someone knows, tell me. I didn't explore yet the source code.

On Chromium bug tracker, another couple of bugs for meta refresh, with some interesting such as this person complaining that a space doesn't work instead of a ;. This is also tracked on WebKit. Something like:

<meta http-equiv="refresh" content="0 url=http://example.com/there" />

Also what should be done with a relative URL.

<meta http-equiv="refresh" content="0;url=/there" />

But for Chromium, I have not found anything really specific to Refresh header. I didn't explore yet the source code.

On Opera bug tracker, it is still closed. We tried to open it when I was working there, and it didn't work.

Competition Of Techniques

Then you can also imagine the hierarchy of commands in a case like this:

HTTP/1.1 301 Permanent Redirect Refresh: 0;url=http://example.net/refresh-header Location: http://example.net/location <!DOCTYPE html> <html> <title>Fresh</title> <meta http-equiv="refresh" content="0;url=http://example.net/meta" /> <body onload="document.location.replace('http://example.net/body')"> </body> </html>

My guess is the 301 always win with the Location HTTP header, or at least it's what I hope.

History

I can find very early references of meta refresh such as in Netscape Developer documentation.

The earliest mention seems to be An Exploration Of Dynamic Documents I can't find anywhere the documentation for Refresh HTTP header on old Netscape Web sites. (Thanks to SecuriTeam Web site and Amit Klein)

So another thing you obviously want to do, in addition to causing the current document to reload, is to cause another document to be reloaded in n seconds in place of the current document. This is easy. The HTTP response header will look like this:

Refresh: 12; URL=http://foo.bar/blatz.html

In June 1996, Jerry Jongerius posted about HTTP/1.1 Refresh header field comments

My concern with "Refresh" is that I do not want it to be a global concept (a browser can only keep track of one refresh)--it looks to be implemented this way in Netscape 2.x. I would like "Refresh" to apply to individual objects (RE: the message below to netscape).

which Roy T. Fielding replied to:

Refresh is no longer in the HTTP/1.1 document -- it has been deferred to HTTP/1.2 (or later).

Should it be documented? Well, there are plenty of issues, there are plenty of hacks around it. I have just touched the surface of it. Maybe it would be worth to document indeed how it is working as implemented now and how it is supposed to be working when there's no interoperability. If I was silly enough, maybe I would do this. HTTP, Archeology and Web Compatibility issues that seems to be close enough from my vices.

Otsukare!

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Robert O'Callahan: Paper Titles

Mozilla planet - wo, 25/03/2015 - 21:45

A few tips on computer science paper titles:

Titles of the form Catchy Project Name: What Our Project Is About are stilted. Show some imagination.

Titles of the form Towards [Some Goal We Totally Failed To Reach] are an obvious attempt to dress up failure as success. Don't do that.

Do write bold papers about negative results. Call your paper [Our Idea] Doesn't Work (And Here's Why) and I'll be excited to read it.

[Goal] Is Harder Than You Think would also get my attention.

If your paper title contains the word Aristotelian, I will never read your work again and skip the conference too --- but you get points for chutzpah.

Note: following this advice may harm your career. Consider a career where you don't have to publish or perish.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Please welcome Allison Banks, Vice President of People

Mozilla Blog - wo, 25/03/2015 - 19:57

We’re thrilled to announce that Allison Banks is joining the leadership team at Mozilla today as our new Vice President of People.

As the leader of our global human resource team at Mozilla, Allison will be responsible, above all, for ensuring our people have what they need to help move our mission forward. Specifically, her team will develop and execute the people-related strategies and activities that will help to foster growth, innovation, and our overall organizational effectiveness.

With over 20 years of experience, Allison joins us most recently from GoPro where she served as Sr. Director of HR overseeing the hiring of 900 people, opening offices in seven countries, integrating acquisitions and building the HR processes and systems required to support a dynamic global organization. Prior to GoPro, she developed her HR expertise and track record for inspiring and supporting people at Perforce Software, Citibank, and Ingres.

Allison’s background, experience and passion for the human side of business is an exceptional fit for Mozilla.

She will be based in the Bay Area, working out of our Mozilla Space in San Francisco and our headquarters in Mountain View.

Please join me in welcoming Allison to Mozilla!

chris

Background:

Allison Banks, Vice President of People, Mozilla

Bio & Mozillians profile

LinkedIn profile

High-res photo

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

The Mozilla Blog: Please welcome Allison Banks, Vice President of People

Mozilla planet - wo, 25/03/2015 - 19:57

We’re thrilled to announce that Allison Banks is joining the leadership team at Mozilla today as our new Vice President of People.

As the leader of our global human resource team at Mozilla, Allison will be responsible, above all, for ensuring our people have what they need to help move our mission forward. Specifically, her team will develop and execute the people-related strategies and activities that will help to foster growth, innovation, and our overall organizational effectiveness.

With over 20 years of experience, Allison joins us most recently from GoPro where she served as Sr. Director of HR overseeing the hiring of 900 people, opening offices in seven countries, integrating acquisitions and building the HR processes and systems required to support a dynamic global organization. Prior to GoPro, she developed her HR expertise and track record for inspiring and supporting people at Perforce Software, Citibank, and Ingres.

Allison’s background, experience and passion for the human side of business is an exceptional fit for Mozilla.

She will be based in the Bay Area, working out of our Mozilla Space in San Francisco and our headquarters in Mountain View.

Please join me in welcoming Allison to Mozilla!

chris

Background:

Allison Banks, Vice President of People, Mozilla

Bio & Mozillians profile

LinkedIn profile

High-res photo

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

How Mozilla is giving back to it's community - opensource.com

Nieuws verzameld via Google - wo, 25/03/2015 - 19:17

opensource.com

How Mozilla is giving back to it's community
opensource.com
Mozilla has a rich history of empowering people on the open web through open education. From an early partnership with P2PU, and the 2010 Mozilla Festival of Learning, Freedom, and the Web, grew initiatives like the highly successful Mozilla Webmaker, ...

en meer »Google Nieuws
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Air Mozilla: Product Coordination Meeting

Mozilla planet - wo, 25/03/2015 - 19:00

Product Coordination Meeting Weekly coordination meeting for Firefox Desktop & Android product planning between Marketing/PR, Engineering, Release Scheduling, and Support.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla WebDev Community: Beer and Tell – March 2015

Mozilla planet - wo, 25/03/2015 - 18:27

Once a month, web developers from across the Mozilla Project get together to design the most dangerous OSHA-compliant workstation possible. While searching for loopholes, we find time to talk about our side projects and drink, an occurrence we like to call “Beer and Tell”.

There’s a wiki page available with a list of the presenters, as well as links to their presentation materials. There’s also a recording available courtesy of Air Mozilla.

Michael Kelly: dxr-cmd

A certain blog post author was first with dxr-cmd, a command-line client for making queries to DXR, Mozilla’s source code browser. The tool is installed via pip and supports any query you can make via the web interface. Output can be run through a pager utility such as less, and you can also control the syntax highlighting applied to the output.

Daniel Maher: AudioAddict plugin for Plex

Next up was phrawzty, who was not present but shared a link to AudioAddict.bundle, a Plex plugin that allows you to play music from AudioAddict-based services (such as radiotunes.com, di.fm, and more).

Peter Bengtsson: Redunter

peterbe shared Redunter, a web service that helps hunt down unused CSS on your website. By embedding a small snippet of JS into your page and browsing through your website, Redunter will analyze the HTML being rendered and compare it to the CSS being served. The end result is a list of CSS rules that did not match any HTML that was delivered to the user. Redunter even works with sites that modify the DOM by watching for mutation events and tracking the altered HTML.

Scott Michaud: GPU-Accelerated Audio

ScottMichaud returns with more fun stuff using the WebCL extension! Scott shared a demo of WebCL-powered audio where a virtual microphone was surrounded by individual raindrop sounds. By controlling the rate of raindrops, you can simulate a higher audio load and see the difference that pushing audio processing to the GPU can make.

Les Orchard: Parsec Patrol

Senior Space Cadet lorchard shared Parsec Patrol, a vector-based space game for the web. While there’s no full game made yet, there is a webpage with several demos showing collision detection, spaceship navigation, missiles, point-defense systems, and more!

Matthew Claypotch: a9r

Have you ever seen an abbreviation like l10n or i18n and had no idea what it meant? Have no fear, Uncle Potch is here with a9r, the answer to the abbreviation problem! Simply install the command and enter in an abbreviation to receive a list of all words in the SOWPODS word list that match. Got a word that you need to abbreviate? Not only can a9r decipher abbreviations, it can create them!

Matthew Claypotch: socketpeer

In a slightly-less-whimsical vein, potch also shared socketpeer, a simple JavaScript library for 1:1 messaging via WebRTC Data Channels and WebSockets. Extracted from the Tanx demo that Mozilla showed at GDC 2015, socketpeer contains both a server API for establishing peer connections between users and a client API to handle the client-side communication. Potch also shared a demo of a peer-to-peer chat application using socketpeer.

Chris Van Wiemeersch: PhantomHAR

Next up was cvan, who shared PhantomHAR, a PhantomJS and SlimerJS script that generates an HTTP Archive (or HAR) for a URL. A HAR is an archive of data about HTTP transactions that can be used to export detailed performance data for tools to consume and analyze, and PhantomHAR allows you to easily generate the HAR for use by these tools.

Chris Van Wiemeersch: fetch-manifest

Next, cvan shared fetch-manifest, a small library that takes a URL, locates the W3C web app manifest for the page, fixes any relative URLs in the manifest, and returns it. This is useful for things like app marketplaces that want to allow people to submit web apps by submitting a single URL to the app they want to submit.

Bill Walker: robot-threejs

Last up was bwalker, who shared robot-threejs, an experimental steampunk robot game powered by three.js and WebGL. The game currently allows you to fly around a 3D environment that has 3D positional audio emitting from an incredibly mysterious cube. CAN YOU SOLVE THE CUBE MYSTERY?

This month we think we’ve really got something special with our Seki Edge keyboard-and-mouse combo. Order now and get a free box of Band-aids at no additional cost!

If you’re interested in attending the next Beer and Tell, sign up for the dev-webdev@lists.mozilla.org mailing list. An email is sent out a week beforehand with connection details. You could even add yourself to the wiki and show off your side-project!

See you next month!

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Microsoft blacklists latest rogue SSL certificates, Mozilla mulls sanctions ... - CSO Online

Nieuws verzameld via Google - wo, 25/03/2015 - 18:16

CSO Online

Microsoft blacklists latest rogue SSL certificates, Mozilla mulls sanctions ...
CSO Online
Microsoft has blacklisted a subordinate CA certificate that was wrongfully used to issue SSL certificates for several Google websites. The action will prevent those certificates from being used in Google website spoofing attacks against Internet ...
Google and Mozilla block bogus certificates from ChinaV3.co.uk

alle 108 nieuwsartikelen »Google Nieuws
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Air Mozilla: The Joy of Coding (mconley livehacks on Firefox) - Episode 7

Mozilla planet - wo, 25/03/2015 - 18:00

The Joy of Coding (mconley livehacks on Firefox) - Episode 7 Watch mconley livehack on Firefox Desktop bugs!

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Air Mozilla: Content Services

Mozilla planet - wo, 25/03/2015 - 17:48

Content Services Content Services

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Microsoft blacklists latest rogue SSL certificates, Mozilla mulls sanctions ... - PC World

Nieuws verzameld via Google - wo, 25/03/2015 - 15:16

V3.co.uk

Microsoft blacklists latest rogue SSL certificates, Mozilla mulls sanctions ...
PC World
Google and Mozilla blacklisted the sub-CA certificate misused by MCS Holdings on Monday, so certificates it has signed are no longer trusted by Chrome and Firefox. Microsoft's action Tuesday extended the blacklisting to Internet Explorer and any other ...
Google and Mozilla block bogus certificates from ChinaV3.co.uk

alle 64 nieuwsartikelen »
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Microsoft blacklists latest rogue SSL certificates, Mozilla mulls sanctions ... - PCWorld

Nieuws verzameld via Google - wo, 25/03/2015 - 15:13

V3.co.uk

Microsoft blacklists latest rogue SSL certificates, Mozilla mulls sanctions ...
PCWorld
Google and Mozilla blacklisted the sub-CA certificate misused by MCS Holdings on Monday, so certificates it has signed are no longer trusted by Chrome and Firefox. Microsoft's action Tuesday extended the blacklisting to Internet Explorer and any other ...
Google and Mozilla block bogus certificates from ChinaV3.co.uk
Beijing behind Internet security violation: groupPhys.Org

alle 57 nieuwsartikelen »
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Air Mozilla: Bugzilla Development Meeting

Mozilla planet - wo, 25/03/2015 - 15:00

Bugzilla Development Meeting Help define, plan, design, and implement Bugzilla's future!

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Advancing Content: Content Services Team Adds New Talent With Partnerships (and Mozilla) Experience

Mozilla planet - wo, 25/03/2015 - 14:53

Earlier this year I wrote about how 2015 will be a big year for Mozilla to scale and build better personalized experiences as we help move the ad industry forward. Today, I’m excited to announce two new additions to our Content Services team as we continue our mission to create innovative content offerings while always upholding Mozilla’s commitment to user privacy.

Accomplished interactive advertising expert Aaron Lasilla has joined Mozilla and our Content Services team as head of content partnerships. Aaron comes to us from EA Games where he served as the global director of brand solutions and co-founded the in-game advertising group. Aaron was instrumental in negotiating and securing a number of strategic partnerships for EA’s publishing division as he built the group it into a new business and revenue channel for EA, including the largest EA Online partnership ever (within Pogo.com’s casual games offering, in 2003). During his tenure, EA was established as the number one publisher of integrated advertising placements and partnership in and around games. Aaron previously managed Microsoft’s Premium Games Advertising offering and also worked in sales and sponsorship capacities for Double Fusion, Clear Channel Entertainment and Kemper Sports Marketing.

As we continue to develop and refine our new offerings like Firefox Tiles, Aaron will be focusing on engagement and value exchange for Mozilla’s offerings while maintaining the same quality and standards of user experience that Mozilla is known for.

In addition, I’m excited to formally announce that long-time Mozillian Patrick Finch joined our group late last year as director of marketing. Patrick has been with Mozilla for over seven years based out of Sweden and has worked in a number of strategic roles on Mozilla’s desktop and mobile projects over that time. Prior to joining Mozilla Patrick spent over ten years at Sun Microsystems in a variety of capacities including working on numerous open source projects.

As we continue the rollout of Firefox Tiles and bring on new partners, you’ll probably be seeing more of Aaron and Patrick on this blog. If you’re interested in partnering with us in our mission or if you’d just like to drop our team a line, feel free to reach out to us at contentservices@mozilla.com.

Aaron Lassila

Aaron Lassila

Patrick Finch

Patrick Finch

 

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

J. Ryan Stinnett: WiFi Debugging for Firefox OS

Mozilla planet - wo, 25/03/2015 - 14:51

I am excited to announce that we're now shipping WiFi debugging for Firefox OS! It's available in Firefox OS 3.0 / master with Firefox Nightly on desktop.

WiFi debugging allows WebIDE to connect to your Firefox OS device via your local WiFi network instead of a USB cable.

The connection experience is generally more straightforward (especially after connecting to a device the first time) than with USB and also more convenient to use since you're no longer tied down by a cable.

Security

A large portion of this project has gone towards making the debugging connection secure, so that you can use it safely on shared network, such as an office or coffee shop.

We use TLS for encryption and authentication. The computer and device both create self-signed certificates. When you connect, a QR code is scanned to verify that the certificates can be trusted. During the connection process, you can choose to remember this information and connect immediately in the future if desired.

How to Use

You'll need to assemble the following bits and bobs:

On Firefox OS, enable WiFi debugging:

  1. Go to Developer Settings on device (Settings -> Developer)
  2. Enable DevTools via Wi-Fi
  3. Edit the device name if desired

Firefox OS WiFi Debugging Options

To connect from Firefox Desktop:

  1. Open WebIDE in Firefox Nightly (Tools -> Web Developer -> WebIDE)
  2. Click "Select Runtime" to open the runtimes panel
  3. Your Firefox OS device should show up in the "WiFi Devices" section
  4. A connection prompt will appear on device, choose "Scan" or "Scan and Remember"
  5. Scan the QR code displayed in WebIDE

WebIDE WiFi Runtimes WebIDE Displays the QR Code

After scanning the QR code, the QR display should disappear and the "device" icon in WebIDE will turn blue for "connected".

You can then access all of your remote apps and browser tabs just as you can today over USB.

Technical Aside

This process does not use ADB at all on the device, so if you find ADB inconvenient while debugging or would rather not install ADB at all, then WiFi debugging is the way to go.

By skipping ADB, we don't have to worry about driver confusion, especially on Windows and Linux.

Supported Devices

This feature should be supported on any Firefox OS device. So far, I've tested it on the Flame and Nexus 4.

Known Issues

The QR code scanner can be a bit frustrating at the moment, as real devices appear to capture a very low resolution picture. Bug 1145772 aims to improve this soon. You should be able to scan with the Flame by trying a few different orientations. I would suggest using "Scan and Remember", so that scanning is only needed for the first connection.

If you find other issues while testing, please file bugs or contact me on IRC.

Acknowledgments

This was quite a complex project, and many people provided advice and reviews while working on this feature, including (in semi-random order):

  • Brian Warner
  • Trevor Perrin
  • David Keeler
  • Honza Bambas
  • Patrick McManus
  • Jason Duell
  • Panos Astithas
  • Jan Keromnes
  • Alexandre Poirot
  • Paul Rouget
  • Paul Theriault

I am probably forgetting others as well, so I apologize if you were omitted.

What's Next

I'd like to add this ability for Firefox for Android next. Thankfully, most of the work done here can be reused there.

If there are features you'd like to see added, file bugs or contact the team via various channels.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla Extends Its Default Google Search Blockout, Signs Up Yandex In Turkey - TechCrunch

Nieuws verzameld via Google - wo, 25/03/2015 - 11:41

TechCrunch

Mozilla Extends Its Default Google Search Blockout, Signs Up Yandex In Turkey
TechCrunch
Mozilla last November made waves when it swapped out Google as the default search engine in its Firefox browser in the U.S., replacing it with Yahoo, and put Yandex in for Google in Russia at the same time. Today Mozilla announced an expansion of that ...

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

François Marier: Keeping up with noisy blog aggregators using PlanetFilter

Mozilla planet - wo, 25/03/2015 - 10:55

I follow a few blog aggregators (or "planets") and it's always a struggle to keep up with the amount of posts that some of these get. The best strategy I have found so far to is to filter them so that I remove the blogs I am not interested in, which is why I wrote PlanetFilter.

Other options

In my opinion, the first step in starting a new free software project should be to look for a reason not to do it :) So I started by looking for another approach and by asking people around me how they dealt with the firehoses that are Planet Debian and Planet Mozilla.

It seems like a lot of people choose to "randomly sample" planet feeds and only read a fraction of the posts that are sent through there. Personally however, I find there are a lot of authors whose posts I never want to miss so this option doesn't work for me.

A better option that other people have suggested is to avoid subscribing to the planet feeds, but rather to subscribe to each of the author feeds separately and prune them as you go. Unfortunately, this whitelist approach is a high maintenance one since planets constantly add and remove feeds. I decided that I wanted to follow a blacklist approach instead.

PlanetFilter

PlanetFilter is a local application that you can configure to fetch your favorite planets and filter the posts you see.

If you get it via Debian or Ubuntu, it comes with a cronjob that looks at all configuration files in /etc/planetfilter.d/ and outputs filtered feeds in /var/cache/planetfilter/.

You can either:

  • add file:///var/cache/planetfilter/planetname.xml to your local feed reader
  • serve it locally (e.g. http://localhost/planetname.xml) using a webserver, or
  • host it on a server somewhere on the Internet.

The software will fetch new posts every hour and overwrite the local copy of each feed.

A basic configuration file looks like this:

[feed] url = http://planet.debian.org/atom.xml [blacklist] Filters

There are currently two ways of filtering posts out. The main one is by author name:

[blacklist] authors = Alice Jones John Doe

and the other one is by title:

[blacklist] titles = This week in review Wednesday meeting for

In both cases, if a blog entry contains one of the blacklisted authors or titles, it will be discarded from the generated feed.

Tor support

Since blog updates happen asynchronously in the background, they can work very well over Tor.

In order to set that up in the Debian version of planetfilter:

  1. Install the tor and polipo packages.
  2. Set the following in /etc/polipo/config:

    proxyAddress = "127.0.0.1" proxyPort = 8008 allowedClients = 127.0.0.1 allowedPorts = 1-65535 proxyName = "localhost" cacheIsShared = false socksParentProxy = "localhost:9050" socksProxyType = socks5 chunkHighMark = 67108864 diskCacheRoot = "" localDocumentRoot = "" disableLocalInterface = true disableConfiguration = true dnsQueryIPv6 = no dnsUseGethostbyname = yes disableVia = true censoredHeaders = from,accept-language,x-pad,link censorReferer = maybe
  3. Tell planetfilter to use the polipo proxy by adding the following to /etc/default/planetfilter:

    export http_proxy="localhost:8008" export https_proxy="localhost:8008"
Bugs and suggestions

The source code is available on repo.or.cz.

I've been using this for over a month and it's been working quite well for me. If you give it a go and run into any problems, please file a bug!

I'm also interested in any suggestions you may have.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

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