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David Burns: The final major player is set to ship WebDriver

Mozilla planet - do, 16/06/2016 - 11:28

It was nearly a year ago that Microsoft shipped their first implementation of WebDriver. I remember being so excited as I wrote a blog post about it.

This week, Apple have said that they are going to be shipping a version of WebDriver that will allow people to drive Safari 10 in macOS. In the release notes they have created safari driver that will be shipping with the OS.

In addition to new Web Inspector features in Safari 10, we are also bringing native WebDriver support to macOS. https://t.co/PfwmkRIBIV

— WebKit (@webkit) June 15, 2016

If you have ever wondered why this is important? Have a read of my last blog post. In Firefox 47 Selenium caused Firefox to crash on startup. The Mozilla implementation of WebDriver, called Marionette and GeckoDriver, would never have hit this problem because test failures and crashes like this would lead to patches being reverted and never shipped to end users.

Many congratulations to the Apple team for making this happen!

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla erweitert Vorstand - Linux-Magazin Online

Nieuws verzameld via Google - do, 16/06/2016 - 11:22

Linux-Magazin Online

Mozilla erweitert Vorstand
Linux-Magazin Online
Die Vorsitzende Mitchell Baker geht in einem Blogpost auf die Anforderungen ein, die Mozilla an ein Vorstandsmitglied stellt. Diese Anfroderungen würden sich deutlich von den üblicherweise an Vorstände gestellten unterscheiden, so Baker. Bei Mozilla ...

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla Releases Firefox 47, Addressing Plentiful Vulnerabilities in its Browser - SPAMfighter News (press release)

Nieuws verzameld via Google - do, 16/06/2016 - 07:40

Mozilla Releases Firefox 47, Addressing Plentiful Vulnerabilities in its Browser
SPAMfighter News (press release)
In an advisory by Mozilla issued on Tuesday, one security flaw is buffer overflow flaw capable of leading to potential crash. Security Researcher who calls himself Firehack says the overflow was capable of popping up if user's Web-browser performed ...

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Yunier José Sosa Vázquez: Conoce los complementos destacados para junio

Mozilla planet - do, 16/06/2016 - 04:04

Como cada mes, les traemos de primera mano los complementos recomendamos para los usuarios de Firefox.

Ver entrada en el blog de los Addons »

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla Announces the Release of Firefox 47 with new HTML5 Video Support - HTML Goodies

Nieuws verzameld via Google - do, 16/06/2016 - 02:49

Mozilla Announces the Release of Firefox 47 with new HTML5 Video Support
HTML Goodies
Mozilla today released the stable version of version 47 of its browser which was in beta since April this year. The new HTML5 video features include support for Google's Widevine CDM DRM protected HTML5 video streams. Video streaming services like ...

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Anjana Vakil: I want to mock with you

Mozilla planet - do, 16/06/2016 - 02:00

This post brought to you from Mozilla’s London All Hands meeting - cheers!

When writing Python unit tests, sometimes you want to just test one specific aspect of a piece of code that does multiple things.

For example, maybe you’re wondering:

  • Does object X get created here?
  • Does method X get called here?
  • Assuming method X returns Y, does the right thing happen after that?

Finding the answers to such questions is super simple if you use mock: a library which “allows you to replace parts of your system under test with mock objects and make assertions about how they have been used.” Since Python 3.3 it’s available simply as unittest.mock, but if you’re using an earlier Python you can get it from PyPI with pip install mock.

So, what are mocks? How do you use them?

Well, in short I could tell you that a Mock is a sort of magical object that’s intended to be a doppelgänger for some object in your code that you want to test. Mocks have special attributes and methods you can use to find out how your test is using the object you’re mocking. For example, you can use Mock.called and .call_count to find out if and how many times a method has been called. You can also manipulate Mocks to simulate functionality that you’re not directly testing, but is necessary for the code you’re testing. For example, you can set Mock.return_value to pretend that an function gave you some particular output, and make sure that the right thing happens in your program.

But honestly, I don’t think I could give a better or more succinct overview of mocks than the Quick Guide, so for a real intro you should go read that. While you’re doing that, I’m going to watch this fantastic Michael Jackson video:

Oh you’re back? Hi! So, now that you have a basic idea of what makes Mocks super cool, let me share with you some of the tips/tips/trials/tribulations I discovered when starting to use them.

Patches and namespaces

tl;dr: Learn where to patch if you don’t want to be sad!

When you import a helper module into a module you’re testing, the tested module gets its own namespace for the helper module. So if you want to mock a class from the helper module, you need to mock it within the tested module’s namespace.

For example, let’s say I have a Super Useful helper module, which defines a class HelperClass that is So Very Helpful:

# helper.py class HelperClass(): def __init__(self): self.name = "helper" def help(self): helpful = True return helpful

And in the module I want to test, tested, I instantiate the Incredibly Helpful HelperClass, which I imported from helper.py:

# tested.py from helper import HelperClass def fn(): h = HelperClass() # using tested.HelperClass return h.help()

Now, let’s say that it is Incredibly Important that I make sure that a HelperClass object is actually getting created in tested, i.e. that HelperClass() is being called. I can write a test module that patches HelperClass, and check the resulting Mock object’s called property. But I have to be careful that I patch the right HelperClass! Consider test_tested.py:

# test_tested.py import tested from mock import patch # This is not what you want: @patch('helper.HelperClass') def test_helper_wrong(mock_HelperClass): tested.fn() assert mock_HelperClass.called # Fails! I mocked the wrong class, am sad :( # This is what you want: @patch('tested.HelperClass') def test_helper_right(mock_HelperClass): tested.fn() assert mock_HelperClass.called # Passes! I am not sad :)

OK great! If I patch tested.HelperClass, I get what I want.

But what if the module I want to test uses import helper and helper.HelperClass(), instead of from helper import HelperClass and HelperClass()? As in tested2.py:

# tested2.py import helper def fn(): h = helper.HelperClass() return h.help()

In this case, in my test for tested2 I need to patch the class with patch('helper.HelperClass') instead of patch('tested.HelperClass'). Consider test_tested2.py:

# test_tested2.py import tested2 from mock import patch # This time, this IS what I want: @patch('helper.HelperClass') def test_helper_2_right(mock_HelperClass): tested2.fn() assert mock_HelperClass.called # Passes! I am not sad :) # And this is NOT what I want! # Mock will complain: "module 'tested2' does not have the attribute 'HelperClass'" @patch('tested2.HelperClass') def test_helper_2_right(mock_HelperClass): tested2.fn() assert mock_HelperClass.called

Wonderful!

In short: be careful of which namespace you’re patching in. If you patch whatever object you’re testing in the wrong namespace, the object that’s created will be the real object, not the mocked version. And that will make you confused and sad.

I was confused and sad when I was trying to mock the TestManifest.active_tests() function to test BaseMarionetteTestRunner.add_test, and I was trying to mock it in the place it was defined, i.e. patch('manifestparser.manifestparser.TestManifest.active_tests').

Instead, I had to patch TestManifest within the runner.base module, i.e. the place where it was actually being called by the add_test function, i.e. patch('marionette.runner.base.TestManifest.active_tests').

So don’t be confused or sad, mock the thing where it is used, not where it was defined!

Pretending to read files with mock_open

One thing I find particularly annoying is writing tests for modules that have to interact with files. Well, I guess I could, like, write code in my tests that creates dummy files and then deletes them, or (even worse) just put some dummy files next to my test module for it to use. But wouldn’t it be better if I could just skip all that and pretend the files exist, and have whatever content I need them to have?

It sure would! And that’s exactly the type of thing mock is really helpful with. In fact, there’s even a helper called mock_open that makes it super simple to pretend to read a file. All you have to do is patch the builtin open function, and pass in mock_open(read_data="my data") to the patch to make the open in the code you’re testing only pretend to open a file with that content, instead of actually doing it.

To see it in action, you can take a look at a (not necessarily great) little test I wrote that pretends to open a file and read some data from it:

def test_nonJSON_file_throws_error(runner): with patch('os.path.exists') as exists: exists.return_value = True with patch('__builtin__.open', mock_open(read_data='[not {valid JSON]')): with pytest.raises(Exception) as json_exc: runner._load_testvars() # This is the code I want to test, specifically to be sure it throws an exception assert 'not properly formatted' in json_exc.value.message Gotchya: Mocking and debugging at the same time

See that patch('os.path.exists') in the test I just mentioned? Yeah, that’s probably not a great idea. At least, I found it problematic.

I was having some difficulty with a similar test, in which I was also patching os.path.exists to fake a file (though that wasn’t the part I was having problems with), so I decided to set a breakpoint with pytest.set_trace() to drop into the Python debugger and try to understand the problem. The debugger I use is pdb++, which just adds some helpful little features to the default pdb, like colors and sticky mode.

So there I am, merrily debugging away at my (Pdb++) prompt. But as soon as I entered the patch('os.path.exists') context, I started getting weird behavior in the debugger console: complaints about some ~/.fancycompleterrc.py file and certain commands not working properly.

It turns out that at least one module pdb++ was using (e.g. fancycompleter) was getting confused about file(s) it needs to function, because of checks for os.path.exists that were now all messed up thanks to my ill-advised patch. This had me scratching my head for longer than I’d like to admit.

What I still don’t understand (explanations welcome!) is why I still got this weird behavior when I tried to change the test to patch 'mymodule.os.path.exists' (where mymodule.py contains import os) instead of just 'os.path.exists'. Based on what we saw about namespaces, I figured this would restrict the mock to only mymodule, so that pdb++ and related modules would be safe - but it didn’t seem to have any effect whatsoever. But I’ll have to save that mystery for another day (and another post).

Still, lesson learned: if you’re patching a commonly used function, like, say, os.path.exists, don’t forget that once you’re inside that mocked context, you no longer have access to the real function at all! So keep an eye out, and mock responsibly!

Mock the night away

Those are just a few of the things I’ve learned in my first few weeks of mocking. If you need some bedtime reading, check out these resources that I found helpful:

I’m sure mock has all kinds of secrets, magic, and superpowers I’ve yet to discover, but that gives me something to look forward to! If you have mock-foo tips to share, just give me a shout on Twitter!

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Chris Ilias: Who uses voice control?

Mozilla planet - do, 16/06/2016 - 00:55

Voice control (Siri, Google Now, Amazon Echo, etc.) is not a very useful feature to me, and wonder if I’m in the minority.

Why it is not useful:

  • I live with other people.
    • Sometimes one of the people I live with or myself may be sleeping. If someone speaks out loud to the TV or phone, that might wake the other up.
    • Even when everyone is awake, that doesn’t mean we are together. It annoys me when someone talks to the TV while watching basketball. I don’t want to find out how annoying it would be to listen to someone in another room tell the TV or their phone what to do.
  • I work with other people.
    • If I’m having lunch, and a co-worker wants to look something up on his/her phone, I don’t want to hear them speak their queries out loud. I actually have coworkers that use their phones as boomboxes to listen to music while eating lunch, as if no-one else can hear it, or everyone has the same taste in music, or everyone wants to listen to music at all during lunch.

The only times I use Siri are:

  • When I am in the car.
  • When I am speaking with others in a social setting, like a pub, and we want to look something up pertaining to the conversation.
  • When I’m alone

When I saw Apple introduce tvOS, the dependence on Siri turned me off from upgrading my Apple TV.

Am I in the minority here?

I get the feeling I’m not. I cannot recall anyone I know using Siri for other anything than entertainment with friends. Controlling devices with your voice in public must be Larry David’s worst nightmare.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Container-Tabs: Mozilla aktiviert neues Privatsphäre-Feature in Firefox - soeren-hentzschel.at

Nieuws verzameld via Google - wo, 15/06/2016 - 23:49

soeren-hentzschel.at

Container-Tabs: Mozilla aktiviert neues Privatsphäre-Feature in Firefox
soeren-hentzschel.at
Mozilla hat in der Nightly-Version von Firefox 50 ein neues Privatsphäre-Feature standardmäßig aktiviert: Container-Tabs. Diese erweitern das bisherige Profil-Konzept um einen Kontext. Sogenannte Container erlauben beispielsweise, auf einer Webseite ...

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Jen Kagan: day 18: the case of the missing vine api and the add-on sdk

Mozilla planet - wo, 15/06/2016 - 23:17

i’m trying to add vine support to min-vid and realizing that i’m still having a hard time wrapping my head around the min-vid program structure.

what does adding vine support even mean? it means that when you’re on vine.co, i want you to be able to right click on any video on the website, send it to the corner of your browser, and watch vines in the corner while you continue your browsing.

i’m running into a few obstacles. one obstacle is that i can’t find an official vine api. what’s an api? it stands for “application programming interface” (maybe? i think? no, i’m not googling) and i don’t know the official definition, but my unofficial definition is that the api is documentation i need from vine about how to access and manipulate content they have on their website. i need to be able to know the pattern for structuring video URLs. i need to know what functions to call in order to autoplay, loop, pause, and mute their videos. since this doesn’t exist in an official, well-documented way, i made a gist of their embed.js file, which i think/hope maybe controls their embedded videos, and which i want to eventually make sense of by adding inline comments.

another obstacle is that mozilla’s add-on sdk is really weirdly structured. i wrote about this earlier and am still sketching it out. here’s what i’ve gathered so far:

  • the page you navigate to in your browser is a page. with its own DOM. this is the page DOM.
  • the firefox add-on is made of content scripts (CS) and page scripts (PS).
  • the CS talks to the page DOM and the PS talks to the page DOM, but the CS and the PS don’t talk to each other.
  • with min-vid, the CS is index.js. this controls the context menu that comes up when you right click, and it’s the thing that tells the panel to show itself in the corner.
  • the two PS’s in min-vid are default.html and controls.js. the default.html PS loads the stuff inside the panel. the controls.js PS lets you control the stuff that’s in the panel.

so far, i can get the vine video to show up in the panel, but only after i’ve sent a youtube video to the panel. i can’t the vine video to show up on its own, and i’m not sure why. this makes me sad. here is a sketch:

FullSizeRender-1

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Doug Belshaw: Why we need 'view source' for digital literacy frameworks

Mozilla planet - wo, 15/06/2016 - 20:01

Apologies if this post comes across as a little jaded, but as someone who wrote their doctoral thesis on this topic, I had to stifle a yawn when I saw that the World Economic Forum have defined 8 digital skills we must teach our children.

World Economic Forum - digital skills

In a move so unsurprising that it’s beyond pastiche, they’ve also coined a new term:

Digital intelligence or “DQ” is the set of social, emotional and cognitive abilities that enable individuals to face the challenges and adapt to the demands of digital life.

I don’t mean to demean what is obviously thoughtful and important work, but I do wonder how (and who!) came up with this. They’ve got an online platform which helps develop the skills they’ve identified as important, but it’s difficult to fathom why some things were included and others left out.

An audit-trail of decision-making is important, as it reveals both the explicit and implicit biases of those involved in the work, as well as lazy shortcuts they may have taken. I attempted to do this in my work as lead of Mozilla’s Web Literacy Map project through the use of a wiki, but even that could have been clearer.

What we need is the equivalent of ‘view source’ for digital literacy frameworks. Specifically, I’m interested in answers to the following 10 questions:

  1. Who worked on this?
  2. What’s the goal of the organisation(s) behind this?
  3. How long did you spend researching this area?
  4. What are you trying to achieve through the creation of this framework?
  5. Why do you need to invent a new term? Why do very similar (and established) words and phrases not work well in this context?
  6. How long is this project going to be supported for?
  7. Is your digital literacy framework versioned?
  8. If you’ve included skills, literacies,and habits of mind that aren’t obviously 'digital’, why is that?
  9. What were the tough decisions that you made? Why did you come down on the side you did?
  10. What further work do you need to do to improve this framework?

I’d be interested in your thoughts and feedback around this post. Have you seen a digital literacy framework that does this well? What other questions would you add?

Note: I haven’t dived into the visual representation of digital literacy frameworks. That’s a whole other can of worms…

Get in touch! I’m @dajbelshaw and you can email me: hello@dynamicskillset.com

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla Open Policy & Advocacy Blog: A Step Forward for Net Neutrality in the U.S.

Mozilla planet - wo, 15/06/2016 - 16:55

We’re thrilled to see the D.C. Circuit Court upholding the FCC’s historic net neutrality order, and the agency’s authority to continue to protect Internet users and businesses from throttling and blocking. Protecting openness and innovation is at the core of Mozilla’s mission. Net neutrality supports a level playing field, critical to ensuring a healthy, innovative, and open Web.

Leading up to this ruling Mozilla filed a joint amicus brief with CCIA supporting the order, and engaged extensively in the FCC proceedings. We filed a written petition, provided formal comments along the way, and engaged our community with a petition to Congress. Mozilla also organized global teach-ins and a day of action, and co-authored a letter to the President.

We’re glad to see this development and we remain steadfast in our position that net neutrality is a critical factor to ensuring the Internet is open and accessible. Mozilla is committed to continuing to advocate for net neutrality principles around the world.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Après Google et Mozilla, Apple enterre aussi Flash dans macOS Sierra - Numerama

Nieuws verzameld via Google - wo, 15/06/2016 - 14:38

Numerama

Après Google et Mozilla, Apple enterre aussi Flash dans macOS Sierra
Numerama
Après Google avec Chrome et Mozilla avec Firefox, c'est au tour d'Apple de planter son clou dans la tombe de Flash. Sur la version de Safari qui sera disponible avec macOS Sierra, Flash sera désactivé par défaut et devra être activé au cas par cas par ...

en meer »
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Daniel Stenberg: No websockets over HTTP/2

Mozilla planet - wo, 15/06/2016 - 13:55

There is no websockets for HTTP/2.

By this, I mean that there’s no way to negotiate or upgrade a connection to websockets over HTTP/2 like there is for HTTP/1.1 as expressed by RFC 6455. That spec details how a client can use Upgrade: in a HTTP/1.1 request to switch that connection into a websockets connection.

Note that websockets is not part of the HTTP/1 spec, it just uses a HTTP/1 protocol detail to switch an HTTP connection into a websockets connection. Websockets over HTTP/2 would similarly not be a part of the HTTP/2 specification but would be separate.

(As a side-note, that Upgrade: mechanism is the same mechanism a HTTP/1.1 connection can get upgraded to HTTP/2 if the server supports it – when not using HTTPS.)

chinese-socket

Draft

There’s was once a draft submitted that describes how websockets over HTTP/2 could’ve been done. It didn’t get any particular interest in the IETF HTTP working group back then and as far as I’ve seen, there has been very little general interest in any group to pick up this dropped ball and continue running. It just didn’t go any further.

This is important: the lack of websockets over HTTP/2 is because nobody has produced a spec (and implementations) to do websockets over HTTP/2. Those things don’t happen by themselves, they actually require a bunch of people and implementers to believe in the cause and work for it.

Websockets over HTTP/2 could of course have the benefit that it would only be one stream over the connection that could serve regular non-websockets traffic at the same time in many other streams, while websockets upgraded on a HTTP/1 connection uses the entire connection exclusively.

Instead

So what do users do instead of using websockets over HTTP/2? Well, there are several options. You probably either stick to HTTP/2, upgrade from HTTP/1, use Web push or go the WebRTC route!

If you really need to stick to websockets, then you simply have to upgrade to that from a HTTP/1 connection – just like before. Most people I’ve talked to that are stuck really hard on using websockets are app developers that basically only use a single connection anyway so doing that HTTP/1 or HTTP/2 makes no meaningful difference.

Sticking to HTTP/2 pretty much allows you to go back and use the long-polling tricks of the past before websockets was created. They were once rather bad since they would waste a connection and be error-prone since you’d have a connection that would sit idle most of the time. Doing this over HTTP/2 is much less of a problem since it’ll just be a single stream that won’t be used that much so it isn’t that much of a waste. Plus, the connection may very well be used by other streams so it will be less of a problem with idle connections getting killed by NATs or firewalls.

The Web Push API was brought by W3C during 2015 and is in many ways a more “webby” way of doing push than the much more manual and “raw” method that websockets is. If you use websockets mostly for push notifications, then this might be a more convenient choice.

Also introduced after websockets, is WebRTC. This is a technique introduced for communication between browsers, but it certainly provides an alternative to some of the things websockets were once used for.

Future

Websockets over HTTP/2 could still be done. The fact that it isn’t done just shows that there isn’t enough interest.

Non-TLS

Recall how browsers only speak HTTP/2 over TLS, while websockets can also be done over plain TCP. In fact, the only way to upgrade a HTTP connection to websockets is using the HTTP/1 Upgrade: header trick, and not the ALPN method for TLS that HTTP/2 uses to reduce the number of round-trips required.

If anyone would introduce websockets over HTTP/2, they would then probably only be possible to be made over TLS from within browsers.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

David Burns: Selenium WebDriver and Firefox 47

Mozilla planet - wo, 15/06/2016 - 00:14

With the release of Firefox 47, the extension based version FirefoxDriver is no longer working. There was a change in Firefox that when Selenium started the browser it caused it to crash. It has been fixed but there is a process to get this to release which is slow (to make sure we don't break anything else) so hopefully this version is due for release next week or so.

This does not mean that your tests need to stop working entirely as there are options to keep them working.

Marionette

Firstly, you can use Marionette, the Mozilla version of FirefoxDriver to drive Firefox. This has been in Firefox since about 24 as we, slowly working against Mozilla priorities, getting it up to Selenium level. Currently Marionette is passing ~85% of the Selenium test suite.

I have written up some documentation on how to use Marionette on MDN

I am not expecting everything to work but below is a quick list that I know doesn't work.

  • No support for self-signed certificates
  • No support for actions
  • No support logging endpoint
  • I am sure there are other things we don't remember

It would be great if we could raise bugs.

Firefox 45 ESR or Firefox 46

If you don't want to worry about Marionette, the other option is to downgrade to Firefox 45, preferably the ESR as it won't update to 47 and will update in about 6-9 months time to Firefox 52 when you will need to use Marionette.

Marionette will be turned on by default from Selenium 3, which is currently being worked on by the Selenium community. Ideally when Firefox 52 comes around you will just update to Selenium 3 and, fingers crossed, all works as planned.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Robert O'Callahan: Nastiness Works

Mozilla planet - di, 14/06/2016 - 23:59

One thing I experienced many times at Mozilla was users pressuring developers with nastiness --- ranging from subtle digs to vitriolic abuse, trying to make you feel guilty and/or trigger an "I'll show you! (by fixing the bug)" response. I know it happens in most open-source projects; I've been guilty of using it myself.

I particularly dislike this tactic because it works on me. It really makes me want to fix bugs. But I also know one shouldn't reward bad behavior, so I feel bad fixing those bugs. Maybe the best I can do is call out the bad behavior, fix the bug, and avoid letting that same person use that tactic again.

Perhaps you're wondering "what's wrong with that tactic if it gets bugs fixed?" Development resources are finite so every bug or feature is competing with others. When you use nastiness to manipulate developers into favouring your bug, you're not improving quality generally, you're stealing attention away from other issues whose proponents didn't stoop to that tactic and making developers a little bit miserable in the process. In fact by undermining rational triage you're probably making quality worse overall.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mitchell Baker: Expanding Mozilla’s Boards

Mozilla planet - di, 14/06/2016 - 22:48

This post was originally published on the Mozilla Blog.

Watch the presentation of Mozilla's Boards expansion on AirMozilla

Watch the presentation of Mozilla’s Boards expansion on AirMozilla

In a post earlier this month, I mentioned the importance of building a network of people who can help us identify and recruit potential Board level contributors and senior advisors. We are also currently working to expand both the Mozilla Foundation and Mozilla Corporation Boards.

The role of a Mozilla Board member

I’ve written a few posts about the role of the Board of Directors at Mozilla.

At Mozilla, we invite our Board members to be more involved with management, employees and volunteers than is generally the case. It’s not that common for Board members to have unstructured contacts with individuals or even sometimes the management team. The conventional thinking is that these types of relationships make it hard for the CEO to do his or her job. We feel differently. We have open flows of information in multiple channels. Part of building the world we want is to have built transparency and shared understandings.

We also prefer a reasonably extended “get to know each other” period for our Board members. Sometimes I hear people speak poorly of extended process, but I feel it’s very important for Mozilla.  Mozilla is an unusual organization. We’re a technology powerhouse with a broad Internet openness and empowerment mission at its core. We feel like a product organization to those from the nonprofit world; we feel like a non-profit organization to those from the Internet industry.

It’s important that our Board members understand the full breadth of Mozilla’s mission. It’s important that Mozilla Foundation Board members understand why we build consumer products, why it happens in the subsidiary and why they cannot micro-manage this work. It is equally important that Mozilla Corporation Board members understand why we engage in the open Internet activities of the Mozilla Foundation and why we seek to develop complementary programs and shared goals.

I want all our Board members to understand that “empowering people” encompasses “user communities” but is much broader for Mozilla. Mozilla should be a resource for the set of people who care about the open Internet. We want people to look to Mozilla because we are such an excellent resource for openness online, not because we hope to “leverage our community” to do something that benefits us.

These sort of distinctions can be rather abstract in practice. So knowing someone well enough to be comfortable about these takes a while. We have a couple of ways of doing this. First, we have extensive discussions with a wide range of people. Board candidates will meet the existing Board members, members of the management team, individual contributors and volunteers. We’ve been piloting ways to work with potential Board candidates in some way. We’ve done that with Cathy Davidson, Ronaldo Lemos, Katharina Borchert and Karim Lakhani. We’re not sure we’ll be able to do it with everyone, and we don’t see it as a requirement. We do see this as a good way to get to know how someone thinks and works within the framework of the Mozilla mission. It helps us feel comfortable including someone at this senior level of stewardship.

What does a Mozilla Board member look like

Job descriptions often get long and wordy. We have those too but, for the search of new Board members, we’ve tried something else this time: a visual role description.

Board member job description for Mozilla Foundation

Board member job description for Mozilla Corporation

Board member job description for Mozilla Foundation

Board member job description for Mozilla Foundation

Here is a short explanation of how to read these visuals:

  • The horizontal lines speaks to things that every Board member should have. For instance, to be a Board member, you have to care about the mission and you have to have some cultural sense of Mozilla, etc. They are a set of things that are important for each and every candidate. In addition, there is a set of things that are important for the Board as a whole. For instance, we could put international experience in there or whether the candidate is a public spokesperson. We want some of that but it is not necessary that every Board member has that.
  • In the vertical green columns, we have the particular skills and expertise that we are looking for at this point.
  • We would expect the horizontal lines not to change too much over time and the vertical lines to change depending on who joins the Board and who leaves.

I invite you to look at these documents and provide input on them. If you have candidates that you believe would be good Board members, send them to the boarddevelopment@mozilla.com mailing list. We will use real discretion with the names you send us.

We’ll also be designing a process for how to broaden participation in the process beyond other Board members. We want to take advantage of the awareness and the cluefulness of the organization. That will be part of a future update.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla voorkomt volgende Heartbleed - Computerworld.nl

Nieuws verzameld via Google - di, 14/06/2016 - 14:36

Computerworld.nl

Mozilla voorkomt volgende Heartbleed
Computerworld.nl
Om die reden heeft Mozilla vorige week het Secure Open Source (SOS) fonds opgericht. Daarmee worden beveiligingsaudits, schadebeperking en code-verificaties van open source-projecten gefinancierd. Als onderdeel van dat programma, huurt Mozilla ...
Mozilla haalt stofkam door open sourceAutomatiseringGids

alle 2 nieuwsartikelen »
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Expanding Mozilla’s Boards

Mitchell Baker - di, 14/06/2016 - 13:43

This post was originally published on the Mozilla Blog.

Watch the presentation of Mozilla's Boards expansion on AirMozilla

Watch the presentation of Mozilla’s Boards expansion on AirMozilla

In a post earlier this month, I mentioned the importance of building a network of people who can help us identify and recruit potential Board level contributors and senior advisors. We are also currently working to expand both the Mozilla Foundation and Mozilla Corporation Boards.

The role of a Mozilla Board member

I’ve written a few posts about the role of the Board of Directors at Mozilla.

At Mozilla, we invite our Board members to be more involved with management, employees and volunteers than is generally the case. It’s not that common for Board members to have unstructured contacts with individuals or even sometimes the management team. The conventional thinking is that these types of relationships make it hard for the CEO to do his or her job. We feel differently. We have open flows of information in multiple channels. Part of building the world we want is to have built transparency and shared understandings.

We also prefer a reasonably extended “get to know each other” period for our Board members. Sometimes I hear people speak poorly of extended process, but I feel it’s very important for Mozilla.  Mozilla is an unusual organization. We’re a technology powerhouse with a broad Internet openness and empowerment mission at its core. We feel like a product organization to those from the nonprofit world; we feel like a non-profit organization to those from the Internet industry.

It’s important that our Board members understand the full breadth of Mozilla’s mission. It’s important that Mozilla Foundation Board members understand why we build consumer products, why it happens in the subsidiary and why they cannot micro-manage this work. It is equally important that Mozilla Corporation Board members understand why we engage in the open Internet activities of the Mozilla Foundation and why we seek to develop complementary programs and shared goals.

I want all our Board members to understand that “empowering people” encompasses “user communities” but is much broader for Mozilla. Mozilla should be a resource for the set of people who care about the open Internet. We want people to look to Mozilla because we are such an excellent resource for openness online, not because we hope to “leverage our community” to do something that benefits us.

These sort of distinctions can be rather abstract in practice. So knowing someone well enough to be comfortable about these takes a while. We have a couple of ways of doing this. First, we have extensive discussions with a wide range of people. Board candidates will meet the existing Board members, members of the management team, individual contributors and volunteers. We’ve been piloting ways to work with potential Board candidates in some way. We’ve done that with Cathy Davidson, Ronaldo Lemos, Katharina Borchert and Karim Lakhani. We’re not sure we’ll be able to do it with everyone, and we don’t see it as a requirement. We do see this as a good way to get to know how someone thinks and works within the framework of the Mozilla mission. It helps us feel comfortable including someone at this senior level of stewardship.

What does a Mozilla Board member look like

Job descriptions often get long and wordy. We have those too but, for the search of new Board members, we’ve tried something else this time: a visual role description.

Board member job description for Mozilla Foundation

Board member job description for Mozilla Corporation

Board member job description for Mozilla Foundation

Board member job description for Mozilla Foundation

Here is a short explanation of how to read these visuals:

  • The horizontal lines speaks to things that every Board member should have. For instance, to be a Board member, you have to care about the mission and you have to have some cultural sense of Mozilla, etc. They are a set of things that are important for each and every candidate. In addition, there is a set of things that are important for the Board as a whole. For instance, we could put international experience in there or whether the candidate is a public spokesperson. We want some of that but it is not necessary that every Board member has that.
  • In the vertical green columns, we have the particular skills and expertise that we are looking for at this point.
  • We would expect the horizontal lines not to change too much over time and the vertical lines to change depending on who joins the Board and who leaves.

I invite you to look at these documents and provide input on them. If you have candidates that you believe would be good Board members, send them to the boarddevelopment@mozilla.com mailing list. We will use real discretion with the names you send us.

We’ll also be designing a process for how to broaden participation in the process beyond other Board members. We want to take advantage of the awareness and the cluefulness of the organization. That will be part of a future update.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

The Mozilla Blog: Expanding Mozilla’s Boards

Mozilla planet - di, 14/06/2016 - 13:42
https://air.mozilla.org/moco-mofo-board-development/

Watch the presentation of Mozilla’s Boards expansion on AirMozilla

In a post earlier this month, I mentioned the importance of building a network of people who can help us identify and recruit potential Board level contributors and senior advisors. We are also currently working to expand both the Mozilla Foundation and Mozilla Corporation Boards.

The role of a Mozilla Board member

I’ve written a few posts about the role of the Board of Directors at Mozilla.

At Mozilla, we invite our Board members to be more involved with management, employees and volunteers than is generally the case. It’s not that common for Board members to have unstructured contacts with individuals or even sometimes the management team. The conventional thinking is that these types of relationships make it hard for the CEO to do his or her job. We feel differently. We have open flows of information in multiple channels. Part of building the world we want is to have built transparency and shared understandings.

We also prefer a reasonably extended “get to know each other” period for our Board members. Sometimes I hear people speak poorly of extended process, but I feel it’s very important for Mozilla.  Mozilla is an unusual organization. We’re a technology powerhouse with a broad Internet openness and empowerment mission at its core. We feel like a product organization to those from the nonprofit world; we feel like a non-profit organization to those from the Internet industry.

It’s important that our Board members understand the full breadth of Mozilla’s mission. It’s important that Mozilla Foundation Board members understand why we build consumer products, why it happens in the subsidiary and why they cannot micro-manage this work. It is equally important that Mozilla Corporation Board members understand why we engage in the open Internet activities of the Mozilla Foundation and why we seek to develop complementary programs and shared goals.

I want all our Board members to understand that “empowering people” encompasses “user communities” but is much broader for Mozilla. Mozilla should be a resource for the set of people who care about the open Internet. We want people to look to Mozilla because we are such an excellent resource for openness online, not because we hope to “leverage our community” to do something that benefits us.

These sort of distinctions can be rather abstract in practice. So knowing someone well enough to be comfortable about these takes a while. We have a couple of ways of doing this. First, we have extensive discussions with a wide range of people. Board candidates will meet the existing Board members, members of the management team, individual contributors and volunteers. We’ve been piloting ways to work with potential Board candidates in some way. We’ve done that with Cathy Davidson, Ronaldo Lemos, Katharina Borchert and Karim Lakhani. We’re not sure we’ll be able to do it with everyone, and we don’t see it as a requirement. We do see this as a good way to get to know how someone thinks and works within the framework of the Mozilla mission. It helps us feel comfortable including someone at this senior level of stewardship.

What does a Mozilla Board member look like

Job descriptions often get long and wordy. We have those too but, for the search of new Board members, we’ve tried something else this time: a visual role description.

Board member job description for Mozilla Corporation

Board member job description for Mozilla Corporation

Board member job description for Mozilla Foundation

Board member job description for Mozilla Foundation

Here is a short explanation of how to read these visuals:

  • The horizontal lines speaks to things that every Board member should have. For instance, to be a Board member, you have to care about the mission and you have to have some cultural sense of Mozilla, etc. They are a set of things that are important for each and every candidate. In addition, there is a set of things that are important for the Board as a whole. For instance, we could put international experience in there or whether the candidate is a public spokesperson. We want some of that but it is not necessary that every Board member has that.
  • In the vertical green columns, we have the particular skills and expertise that we are looking for at this point.
  • We would expect the horizontal lines not to change too much over time and the vertical lines to change depending on who joins the Board and who leaves.

I invite you to look at these documents and provide input on them. If you have candidates that you believe would be good Board members, send them to the boarddevelopment@mozilla.com mailing list. We will use real discretion with the names you send us.

We’ll also be designing a process for how to broaden participation in the process beyond other Board members. We want to take advantage of the awareness and the cluefulness of the organization. That will be part of a future update.

 

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Expanding Mozilla’s Boards

Mozilla Blog - di, 14/06/2016 - 13:42
https://air.mozilla.org/moco-mofo-board-development/

Watch the presentation of Mozilla’s Boards expansion on AirMozilla

In a post earlier this month, I mentioned the importance of building a network of people who can help us identify and recruit potential Board level contributors and senior advisors. We are also currently working to expand both the Mozilla Foundation and Mozilla Corporation Boards.

The role of a Mozilla Board member

I’ve written a few posts about the role of the Board of Directors at Mozilla.

At Mozilla, we invite our Board members to be more involved with management, employees and volunteers than is generally the case. It’s not that common for Board members to have unstructured contacts with individuals or even sometimes the management team. The conventional thinking is that these types of relationships make it hard for the CEO to do his or her job. We feel differently. We have open flows of information in multiple channels. Part of building the world we want is to have built transparency and shared understandings.

We also prefer a reasonably extended “get to know each other” period for our Board members. Sometimes I hear people speak poorly of extended process, but I feel it’s very important for Mozilla.  Mozilla is an unusual organization. We’re a technology powerhouse with a broad Internet openness and empowerment mission at its core. We feel like a product organization to those from the nonprofit world; we feel like a non-profit organization to those from the Internet industry.

It’s important that our Board members understand the full breadth of Mozilla’s mission. It’s important that Mozilla Foundation Board members understand why we build consumer products, why it happens in the subsidiary and why they cannot micro-manage this work. It is equally important that Mozilla Corporation Board members understand why we engage in the open Internet activities of the Mozilla Foundation and why we seek to develop complementary programs and shared goals.

I want all our Board members to understand that “empowering people” encompasses “user communities” but is much broader for Mozilla. Mozilla should be a resource for the set of people who care about the open Internet. We want people to look to Mozilla because we are such an excellent resource for openness online, not because we hope to “leverage our community” to do something that benefits us.

These sort of distinctions can be rather abstract in practice. So knowing someone well enough to be comfortable about these takes a while. We have a couple of ways of doing this. First, we have extensive discussions with a wide range of people. Board candidates will meet the existing Board members, members of the management team, individual contributors and volunteers. We’ve been piloting ways to work with potential Board candidates in some way. We’ve done that with Cathy Davidson, Ronaldo Lemos, Katharina Borchert and Karim Lakhani. We’re not sure we’ll be able to do it with everyone, and we don’t see it as a requirement. We do see this as a good way to get to know how someone thinks and works within the framework of the Mozilla mission. It helps us feel comfortable including someone at this senior level of stewardship.

What does a Mozilla Board member look like

Job descriptions often get long and wordy. We have those too but, for the search of new Board members, we’ve tried something else this time: a visual role description.

Board member job description for Mozilla Corporation

Board member job description for Mozilla Corporation

Board member job description for Mozilla Foundation

Board member job description for Mozilla Foundation

Here is a short explanation of how to read these visuals:

  • The horizontal lines speaks to things that every Board member should have. For instance, to be a Board member, you have to care about the mission and you have to have some cultural sense of Mozilla, etc. They are a set of things that are important for each and every candidate. In addition, there is a set of things that are important for the Board as a whole. For instance, we could put international experience in there or whether the candidate is a public spokesperson. We want some of that but it is not necessary that every Board member has that.
  • In the vertical green columns, we have the particular skills and expertise that we are looking for at this point.
  • We would expect the horizontal lines not to change too much over time and the vertical lines to change depending on who joins the Board and who leaves.

I invite you to look at these documents and provide input on them. If you have candidates that you believe would be good Board members, send them to the boarddevelopment@mozilla.com mailing list. We will use real discretion with the names you send us.

We’ll also be designing a process for how to broaden participation in the process beyond other Board members. We want to take advantage of the awareness and the cluefulness of the organization. That will be part of a future update.

 

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

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