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Alon Zakai: Massive, a new work-in-progress asm.js benchmark - feedback is welcome!

Mozilla planet - di, 15/07/2014 - 19:26
Massive is a new benchmark for asm.js. While many JavaScript benchmarks already exist, asm.js - a strict subset of JavaScript, designed to be easy to optimize - poses some new challenges. In particular, asm.js is typically generated by compiling from another language, like C++, and people are using that approach to run large asm.js codebases, by porting existing large C++ codebases (for example, game engines like Unity and Unreal).

Very large codebases can be challenging to optimize for several reasons: Often they contain very large functions, for example, which stress register allocation and other compiler optimizations. Total code size can also cause pauses while the browser parses and prepares to execute a very large script. Existing JavaScript benchmarks typically focus on small programs, and tend to focus on throughput, ignoring things like how responsive the browser is (which matters a lot for the user experience). Massive does focus on those things, by running several large real-world codebases compiled to asm.js, and testing them on throughput, responsiveness, preparation time and variance. For more details, see the FAQ at the bottom of the benchmark page.

Massive is not finished yet, it is a work in progress - the results should not be taken seriously yet (bugs might cause some things to not be measured accurately, etc.). Massive is being developed as an open source project, so please test it and report your feedback. Any issues you find or suggestions for improvements are very welcome!

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla's new image encoder compresses images 5 percent more, Facebook ... - VentureBeat

Nieuws verzameld via Google - di, 15/07/2014 - 19:21

VentureBeat

Mozilla's new image encoder compresses images 5 percent more, Facebook ...
VentureBeat
Mozilla says mozjpeg jand can compress both baseline and progressive JPEGs, reducing the size of either by an average 5 percent, with many images showing significantly larger reductions. Previous versions of mozjpeg only improved compression for ...

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Gregory Szorc: Python Packaging Do's and Don'ts

Mozilla planet - di, 15/07/2014 - 19:20

Are you someone who casually interacts with Python but don't know the inner workings of Python? Then this post is for you. Read on to learn why some things are the way they are and how to avoid making some common mistakes.

Always use Virtualenvs

It is an easy trap to view virtualenvs as an obstacle, a distraction towards accomplishing something. People see me adding virtualenvs to build instructions and they say I don't use virtualenvs, they aren't necessary, why are you doing that?

A virtualenv is effectively an overlay on top of your system Python install. Creating a virtualenv can be thought of as copying your system Python environment into a local location. When you modify virtualenvs, you are modifying an isolated container. Modifying virtualenvs has no impact on your system Python.

A goal of a virtualenv is to isolate your system/global Python install from unwanted changes. When you accidentally make a change to a virtualenv, you can just delete the virtualenv and start over from scratch. When you accidentally make a change to your system Python, it can be much, much harder to recover from that.

Another goal of virtualenvs is to allow different versions of packages to exist. Say you are working on two different projects and each requires a specific version of Django. With virtualenvs, you install one version in one virtualenv and a different version in another virtualenv. Things happily coexist because the virtualenvs are independent. Contrast with trying to manage both versions of Django in your system Python installation. Trust me, it's not fun.

Casual Python users may not encounter scenarios where virtualenvs make their lives better... until they do, at which point they realize their system Python install is beyond saving. People who eat, breath, and die Python run into these scenarios all the time. We've learned how bad life without virtualenvs can be and so we use them everywhere.

Use of virtualenvs is a best practice. Not using virtualenvs will result in something unexpected happening. It's only a matter of time.

Please use virtualenvs.

Never use sudo

Do you use sudo to install a Python package? You are doing it wrong.

If you need to use sudo to install a Python package, that almost certainly means you are installing a Python package to your system/global Python install. And this means you are modifying your system Python instead of isolating it and keeping it pristine.

Instead of using sudo to install packages, create a virtualenv and install things into the virtualenv. There should never be permissions issues with virtualenvs - the user that creates a virtualenv has full realm over it.

Never modify the system Python environment

On some systems, such as OS X with Homebrew, you don't need sudo to install Python packages because the user has write access to the Python directory (/usr/local in Homebrew).

For the reasons given above, don't much around with the system Python environment. Instead, use a virtualenv.

Beware of the package manager

Your system's package manager (apt, yum, etc) is likely using root and/or installing Python packages into the system Python.

For the reasons given above, this is bad. Try to use a virtualenv, if possible. Try to not use the system package manager for installing Python packages.

Use pip for installing packages

Python packaging has historically been a mess. There are a handful of tools and APIs for installing Python packages. As a casual Python user, you only need to know of one of them: pip.

If someone says install a package, you should be thinking create a virtualenv, activate a virtualenv, pip install <package>. You should never run pip install outside of a virtualenv. (The exception is to install virtualenv and pip itself, which you almost certainly want in your system/global Python.)

Running pip install will install packages from PyPI, the Python Packaging Index by default. It's Python's official package repository.

There are a lot of old and outdated tutorials online about Python packaging. Beware of bad content. For example, if you see documentation that says use easy_install, you should be thinking, easy_install is a legacy package installer that has largely been replaced by pip, I should use pip instead. When in doubt, consult the Python packaging user guide and do what it recommends.

Don't trust the Python in your package manager

The more Python programming you do, the more you learn to not trust the Python package provided by your system / package manager.

Linux distributions such as Ubuntu that sit on the forward edge of versions are better than others. But I've run into enough problems with the OS or package manager maintained Python (especially on OS X), that I've learned to distrust them.

I use pyenv for installing and managing Python distributions from source. pyenv also installs virtualenv and pip for me, packages that I believe should be in all Python installs by default. As a more experienced Python programmer, I find pyenv just works.

If you are just a beginner with Python, it is probably safe to ignore this section. Just know that as soon as something weird happens, start suspecting your default Python install, especially if you are on OS X. If you suspect trouble, use something like pyenv to enforce a buffer so the system can have its Python and you can have yours.

Recovering from the past

Now that you know the preferred way to interact with Python, you are probably thinking oh crap, I've been wrong all these years - how do I fix it?

The goal is to get a Python install somewhere that is as pristine as possible. You have two approaches here: cleaning your existing Python or creating a new Python install.

To clean your existing Python, you'll want to purge it of pretty much all packages not installed by the core Python distribution. The exception is virtualenv, pip, and setuptools - you almost certainly want those installed globally. On Homebrew, you can uninstall everything related to Python and blow away your Python directory, typically /usr/local/lib/python*. Then, brew install python. On Linux distros, this is a bit harder, especially since most Linux distros rely on Python for OS features and thus they may have installed extra packages. You could try a similar approach on Linux, but I don't think it's worth it.

Cleaning your system Python and attempting to keep it pure are ongoing tasks that are very difficult to keep up with. All it takes is one dependency to get pulled in that trashes your system Python. Therefore, I shy away from this approach.

Instead, I install and run Python from my user directory. I use pyenv. I've also heard great things about Miniconda. With either solution, you get a Python in your home directory that starts clean and pure. Even better, it is completely independent from your system Python. So if your package manager does something funky, there is a buffer. And, if things go wrong with your userland Python install, you can always nuke it without fear of breaking something in system land. This seems to be the best of both worlds.

Please note that installing packages in the system Python shouldn't be evil. When you create virtualenvs, you can - and should - tell virtualenv to not use the system site-packages (i.e. don't use non-core packages from the system installation). This is the default behavior in virtualenv. It should provide an adequate buffer. But from my experience, things still manage to bleed through. My userland Python install is extra safety. If something wrong happens, I can only blame myself.

Conclusion

Python's long and complicated history of package management makes it very easy for you to shoot yourself in the foot. The long list of outdated tutorials on The Internet make this a near certainty for casual Python users. Using the guidelines in this post, you can adhere to best practices that will cut down on surprises and rage and keep your Python running smoothly.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla introduceert efficiëntere jpeg-encoder - Tweakers

Nieuws verzameld via Google - di, 15/07/2014 - 19:07

Mozilla introduceert efficiëntere jpeg-encoder
Tweakers
Mozilla heeft een efficiëntere encoder voor jpeg-afbeeldingen geïntroduceerd. De encoder is compatibel met bestaande decoders en zou afbeeldingen gemiddeld vijf procent kleiner kunnen maken. Facebook voert al proeven uit met de nieuwe encoder.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Darrin Henein: Side Tabs: Prototyping An Unexpected Productivity Hack

Mozilla planet - di, 15/07/2014 - 18:24

A few months ago, I came across an interesting Github repo authored by my (highly esteemed!) colleague Vlad Vukicevic called VerticalTabs. This is a Firefox add-on which moves your tabs, normally organized horizontally along the top of your browser, to a vertical list docked to either the left or right side of the window. Vlad’s add-on worked great, but I saw a few areas where a small amount of UX and visual design love could make this something I’d be willing to trial. So, I forked.

 

After cloning the repo, I spent a couple days modifying some of the layout, adding a new dark theme to the CSS, and replaced a handful of the images and icons with my own. Ultimately, it was probably a single-digit number of hours spent to get my code to a place that I was happy with. Certainly, there are some issues on certain operating systems, and things like Firefox’s pinned tabs don’t get the treatment I would love them to have, but that was not the point. The point of my experiment was to learn.

Learn? Learn what?

Let’s step back for a moment. Here at Mozilla, we like to experiment. Hack, Play, Make… whatever you’d like to call it. But we don’t like to waste time: we do things with purpose. If we build something, we try to make sure it’s worth the time and effort involved. As a Design Engineer on the UX team, I (along with others) work hard to bring and make clear the value of prototyping to my colleagues. What is the minimal thing we can make to test our assumptions? The reality is that when designing digital products, how it works is equally (arguably more) important than how it looks. Steve Jobs said it best:

Design is how it works.

 

Let’s bring it back to Side Tabs now (I’ll be using Side Tabs and VerticalTabs interchangeably). The hypothesis I was hoping to validate was that there was a subset of the Firefox user base that would find value in the layout that Side Tabs enabled. I wanted to bring this add-on to a level where users would find it delightful and usable enough to at least give it a fair shot.

It’s critically important that before you unleash your experiment and start learning from it, you mitigate (as much as possible) any sources of bias or false-negatives. Make (or fake) it to a point where the data you collect is not influenced by poor design, conflated features, or poor performance/usability. It turned out that this delta, from Vlad’s work to my own version, was a small amount of work. I went for it, pushed it a few steps in the right direction, and shared it with as many people as I could.

I want to restate: the majority of the credit for my particular version of VerticalTabs goes to those who published the work on top of which I built, namely Vlad and Philipp von Weitershausen. Furthermore, the incredibly talented Stephen Horlander has explored the idea of Side Tabs as well, and you will notice his work helped inspire the visual language I used in my implementation. This is how great things are built; rarely from scratch, but more commonly on the shoulders and brilliance of those who came before you.

My Github repo (at time of writing) has 13 stars and is part of a graph with 19 forks. Similarly, I’ve had colleagues fork my repo and take it further, adding improvements and refinements as they go (see my colleague Hayden’s work for one promising effort). I’ve had great response on Twitter from developers and users who love the add-on and who can’t wait to share their ideas and thoughts. It’s awesome to see ideas take shape and grow so organically like this. This is collaboration.

I’ve been using Side Tabs full-time in my default browser (Firefox Nightly) for 5 or 6 months now, and I’ve learned a ton. Aside from now preferring a horizontal layout (made possible by stacking tabs vertically) on a screen pressed for vertical space, I’ve discovered a use case that I never would have imagined had I simply mocked this idea up in Photoshop.

I use productivity tools heavily, from calendars to to-do lists and beyond. One common scenario is this: I click on a link, and it’s something I find interesting or valuable, but I don’t want to address it right now. I’ve experimented with Pocket (I still use this for longer form writing I wish to read later) but find that most of my Read Later lists are Should-but-Never-Actually-Read-Later lists. Out of sight, out of mind, right?

Saving for Later

The Firefox UX Team has actually done some great research on Save for Later behaviour. There is a great blog post here as well as a more detailed research summary here.

By a quite pleasant surprise, the vertical layout of Side Tabs surfaced a solution to me. I found myself appropriating my tab list into a priority-stack , always giving my focus to the tab at the bottom of the list. When I open something I want to keep around, I simply drag it in the list to a spot based on its relative importance; right to the top for ‘Someday’ items, 2nd or 3rd from the bottom if I want to take a peek once I’m done my task at hand (which is always the bottom tab). I’ve even moved to having two Firefox windows open, which essentially gives me two separate task lists: one for personal tabs/to-dos and one for work.

 

So where does this leave us? Quite clearly, it’s shown the immediate value of investing in an interactive prototype versus using only static mockups: people can use the design, see how it works, and in this case, expose a usage pattern I hadn’t seen before. The most common argument against prototyping is the cost involved (time, chiefly), and in my experience the value of building your designs (to varying levels of fidelity, based on the project/hypothesis) always outweighs the cost. Building the design sheds light on design problems and solutions that traditional, static mockups often fail to illuminate.

With regards to Side Tabs itself, I learned that in some cases, users treat their tabs as tasks to accomplish, and when a task is completed, it’s tab is closed. Increasingly so, our work and personal tasks exist online (email, banking, shopping, etc.), and are accessed through the browser. Some tasks (tabs) have higher priority or urgency than others, and whether visible or not, there is an implicit order by which a user will attend to their tabs. Helping users better organize their tabs made using the browser a more productive, delightful experience. And anything that can make an experience more delightful or useful is not only of great value and importance to the product or team I work with, but also to me as a designer.

Get the Add-on Side Tabs on Github

Side Tabs was built in Javascript, CSS and HTML. Knowing how to code, prototype and build the designs I create has been the advantage that has allowed me to excel as a UX designer.

For updates and access to my best content, blog posts and tutorials about designing with code, join my mailing list below!

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Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Christian Heilmann: Maker Party 2014 – go and show off the web to the next makers

Mozilla planet - di, 15/07/2014 - 17:56

Today is the start of this year’s Maker Party campaign. What’s that? Check out this video.

webmaker

Maker Party is Mozilla’s annual campaign to teach the culture, mechanics and citizenship of the web through thousands of community-run events around the world from July 15-September 15, 2014.

This week, Maker Party events in places like Uganda, Taiwan, San Francisco and Mauritius mark the start of tens of thousands of educators, organizations and enthusiastic web users just like you getting together to teach and learn the web.

You can join Maker Party by finding an event in your area and learning more about how the web works in a fun, hands-on way with others. Events are open to everyone regardless of skill level, and almost all are free! Oh, and there will be kickoff events in all the Mozspaces this Thursday—join in!

No events in your area? Why not host one of your own? Maker Party Resources provides all the information you need to successfully throw an event of any size, from 50+ participants in a library or hackerspace to just you and your little sister sitting on the living room sofa.

Go teach the web, believe me, it is fun!

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

We don't need new image formats: Mozilla works to build a better JPEG - Ars Technica

Nieuws verzameld via Google - di, 15/07/2014 - 17:40

We don't need new image formats: Mozilla works to build a better JPEG
Ars Technica
Google has been promoting the use of WebP, the still image derivative of its WebM video codec. Mozilla has also been looking at the issue, but the open source browser organization has come up with a different conclusion: we don't need a new image ...

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Improving JPEG Image Encoding

Mozilla Blog - di, 15/07/2014 - 17:32

Editor’s Note: Andreas Gal, Mozilla CTO, posted on his blog about Mozilla and the recent release of mozjpeg 2.0 and Facebook’s support for the JPEG encoder. This is reposted below:

Images are a big proportion of the data that browsers load when displaying a website, so better image compression goes a long way towards displaying content faster. Over the last few years there has been debate on whether a new image format is needed over the ubiquitous JPEG to provide better image data compression.

We published a study last year which compares JPEG with a number of more recent image formats, including WebP. Since then, we have expanded and updated that study. We did not find that WebP or any other royalty-free format we tested offers sufficient improvements over JPEG to justify the high maintenance cost of adding a new image format to the Web.

As an alternative we recently started an effort to improve the state of the art of JPEG encoders. Our research team released version 2.0 of this enhanced JPEG encoder, mozjpeg today. mozjpeg reduces the size of both baseline and progressive JPEGs by 5% on average, with many images showing significantly larger reductions.

Facebook announced today that they are testing mozjpeg 2.0 to improve the compression of images on facebook.com. It has also donated $60,000 to contribute to the ongoing development of the technology, including the next iteration, mozjpeg 3.0.

“Facebook supports the work Mozilla has done in building a JPEG encoder that can create smaller JPEGs without compromising the visual quality of photos,” said Stacy Kerkela, software engineering manager at Facebook. “We look forward to seeing the potential benefits mozjpeg 2.0 might bring in optimizing images and creating an improved experience for people to share and connect on Facebook.”

mozjpeg improves image encoding while maintaining full backwards compatibility with existing JPEG decoders. This is very significant because any browser can immediately benefit from these improvements without having to adopt new image formats, such as WebP.

The JPEG format continues to evolve along with the Web, and mozjpeg 2.0 will make it easier than ever for users to enjoy those images. Check out the Mozilla Research blog post for all the details.

Andreas Gal
Mozilla CTO

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Frédéric Harper: One year at Mozilla

Mozilla planet - di, 15/07/2014 - 17:19
Click to see full size

Proud to see my name on that monument (Click to see full size)

On July 15th last year, I was starting a new job at Mozilla: it was the beginning of a new journey. Today, it’s been one year that I’m a Mozillian, and I’m proud.

One year later

One year later, I’m still there. It means I like what I’m doing, my team, my manager, and the company. It has been an interesting, but amazing year. I always say that my job is to give love to developers, and it’s true. I’m fortunate enough to have a job where I can share my passion with other, and being paid to help them. During the last year, I spoke at 26 events (conferences, user groups…) sharing about technology and educating developer about open web app like Firefox OS. I’ve helped many developers to fix their bugs, create their applications, provide a better experience to their users, solve the issue they had, and even more important, be successful on the platform.

I’ve always been energized by the fact that the line between working, and having fun for me is really thin, but the volunteers I meet stoked me. The passion, the energy, the time they give to Mozilla, or should I say, to get a better Web, an open one, and help people to take ownership of that web, is astonishing. I will always remember the events I’ve done with them! There is no way you can’t be pumped up for your work, when you see those people giving their time and being dedicated 100% to the mission like that. To all Mozillians, I salute you, thanks for being part of my life!

I can’t write a post about my first year at Mozilla without talking about the travels: I’ve been on the road for 104 days in 15 cities (Toronto, Krakow, San Jose, Brussels, Guadalajara, Budapest, Athens, San Francisco, Moutain View, Barcelona, Paris, Prague, London, Bangalore, and Mumbai) from 12 countries (Canada, Poland, USA, Belgium, Mexico, Hungary, Greece, Spain, France, Czech Republic, UK, and India). For someone who like to discover new cities, cultures, foods, and more, travelling for work is an amazing bonus.

I’ve been a Technical Evangelist for three years, and a half now. I’ve not been in this role for a decade, but it’s not something new for me, I have some experience. Still, I learn a lot in the last year, and it’s perfect as I’m one of the kinds who think we should never stop learning, and improving ourselves. For now, I would not like to be in another position…

Mozilla is a strange beast

The biggest learning curve for me was about the organization, or should I say, the company. Mozilla is a particular beast, a strange one. As far as I know, no other company can be compared to Mozilla: it’s unique. No one can be against the mission of Mozilla, and all the Mozillians move forward to make the web even more open. We are working on amazing projects that changed, and will continue to change the world. We are a bunch of passionate people who believe in what we do, and for any enterprise, it’s a definite asset. We can go, and do what other are afraid to do as we are not there to make money (even if we need money to survive). It’s crazy what all Mozilla together can accomplish.

On the other side, Mozilla is cannibalizing itself. We are getting bigger, and bigger, but we are not always well organized. Because of the nature of Mozilla, everybody has, and wants to give their opinion, and some people tend to forget that it’s their job. The industry has higher expectations for us. We are pro open source, and open web, but we are not always pragmatic. We need volunteers to be successful, but we tend to accept everybody, when we should aim for quality instead of quantity. At the same time, we have so many projects we are working on: it’s not just about Firefox or Firefox OS my friends. Don’t get me wrong, I’m not complaining as I love Mozilla. I guess that it’s part of my reflexion on the last year of my professional life. We are getting better at organizing ourselves, and I hope it will continue that way as I want Mozilla to be the protector of the web for many more years to come!

Today is the first day of my next year at Mozilla, and I’m looking forward to many more!

 


--
One year at Mozilla is a post on Out of Comfort Zone from Frédéric Harper

Related posts:

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Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla releases mozjpeg 2.0 as Facebook tests and backs the JPEG encoder ... - The Next Web

Nieuws verzameld via Google - di, 15/07/2014 - 17:05

Mozilla releases mozjpeg 2.0 as Facebook tests and backs the JPEG encoder ...
The Next Web
Mozilla today announced the release of mozjpeg version 2.0. The JPEG encoder is now capable of reducing the size of both baseline and progressive JPEGs by 5 percent on average (compared to those produced by the standard JPEG library libjpeg-turbo ...

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Facebook joins Mozilla to give Web's image makeover - CNET

Nieuws verzameld via Google - di, 15/07/2014 - 17:02

TechCrunch

Facebook joins Mozilla to give Web's image makeover
CNET
Mozilla studied Google's WebP image format and wasn't convinced it's significantly better than decades-old JPEG. In this chart, a lower number means a smaller file size for a given quality level compared to JPEG. Mozilla used several tests on several ...
Mozilla Launches Improved JPEG EncoderTechCrunch
Mozilla releases mozjpeg 2.0 as Facebook tests and backs the JPEG encoder ...The Next Web
We don't need new image formats: Mozilla works to build a better JPEGArs Technica
AllFacebook
alle 7 nieuwsartikelen »
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla Launches Improved JPEG Encoder - TechCrunch

Nieuws verzameld via Google - di, 15/07/2014 - 17:02

TechCrunch

Mozilla Launches Improved JPEG Encoder
TechCrunch
Mozilla today announced the launch of the latest version of its mozjpeg image encoder for JPEG files. The new version is already being tested on facebook.com, and Facebook donated $60,000 to Mozilla to continue its work on this project. When it comes ...
Facebook joins Mozilla to give Web's image makeoverCNET
Mozilla releases mozjpeg 2.0 as Facebook tests and backs the JPEG encoder ...The Next Web

alle 3 nieuwsartikelen »
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Andreas Gal: Improving JPEG image encoding

Mozilla planet - di, 15/07/2014 - 16:59

Images are a big proportion of the data that browsers load when displaying a website, so better image compression goes a long way towards displaying content faster. Over the last few years there has been debate on whether a new image format is needed over the ubiquitous JPEG to provide better image data compression.

We published a study last year which compares JPEG with a number of more recent image formats, including WebP. Since then, we have expanded and updated that study. We did not find that WebP or any other royalty-free format we tested offers sufficient improvements over JPEG to justify the high maintenance cost of adding a new image format to the Web.

As an alternative we recently started an effort to improve the state of the art of JPEG encoders. Our research team released version 2.0 of this enhanced JPEG encoder, mozjpeg today. mozjpeg reduces the size of both baseline and progressive JPEGs by 5% on average, with many images showing significantly larger reductions.

Facebook announced today that they are testing mozjpeg 2.0 to improve the compression of images on facebook.com. It has also donated $60,000 to contribute to the ongoing development of the technology, including the next iteration, mozjpeg 3.0.

“Facebook supports the work Mozilla has done in building a JPEG encoder that can create smaller JPEGs without compromising the visual quality of photos,” said Stacy Kerkela, software engineering manager at Facebook. “We look forward to seeing the potential benefits mozjpeg 2.0 might bring in optimizing images and creating an improved experience for people to share and connect on Facebook.”

mozjpeg improves image encoding while maintaining full backwards compatibility with existing JPEG decoders. This is very significant because any browser can immediately benefit from these improvements without having to adopt new image formats, such as WebP.

The JPEG format continues to evolve along with the Web, and mozjpeg 2.0 will make it easier than ever for users to enjoy those images. Check out the Mozilla Research blog post for all the details.


Filed under: Mozilla
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla kicks off Maker Party 2014, a two-month celebration of making and ... - The Next Web

Nieuws verzameld via Google - di, 15/07/2014 - 16:48

Mozilla kicks off Maker Party 2014, a two-month celebration of making and ...
The Next Web
For the third year running, Mozilla is celebrating the art of making and learning on the Web with a two-month 'Maker Party' campaign. Until September 15, the non-profit organization will encourage people from across the world to host their own Maker ...

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla Open Policy & Advocacy Blog: Mozilla Submits Comments on FCC Net Neutrality Proposal

Mozilla planet - di, 15/07/2014 - 16:32

Today, Mozilla is filing comments in response to the first of two major deadlines set out by the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) for its latest net neutrality proposal. The FCC describes these rules as a means of “protecting and promoting the open Internet,” and we are encouraging the FCC to stay true to that ideal.

The FCC’s initial proposal offers weak rules, based on fragile “Title I” authority. The proposal represents a significant departure from current law and precedent in this space by expanding on a new area of authority without establishing clear limits. This approach makes it likely that it will be overturned on appeal.

Our comments, like our earlier Petition, urge the FCC to change course from its proposed path, and instead use its “Title II” authority as a basis for real net neutrality protections. We recommended that the FCC modernize the agency’s approach to how Internet Service Providers (ISPs) provide Internet access service. Specifically, we asked the agency to define ISPs’ offerings to edge providers – companies like Dropbox and Netflix that offer valuable services to Internet users – as a separate service. We explained why such a service would need to fall under “Title II” authority, and how in using that basis, the FCC can adopt effective and enforceable rules prohibiting blocking, discrimination, and paid prioritization online, to protect all users, both wired and wireless.

In addition to reiterating support for Title II remote delivery classification, today’s comments address some questions that arose about our initial proposal over the past two months, such as:

• How the Mozilla petition addresses interconnection,
• How forbearance would work,
• How the services we describe can be “services” without direct payment, and
• How the FCC can prohibit paid prioritization under Title II.

Our comments also articulate our views on net neutrality rules:

• A clean rule prohibiting blocking is the most workable and sustainable approach, rather than complex level of service standards;
• Prohibiting unreasonable discrimination is more effective than weaker alternatives such as “commercially unreasonable practices”;
• Paid prioritization inherently degrades the open Internet; and
• Mobile access services should have the same protections as fixed.

Mozilla will continue engaging closely with policymakers and stakeholders on this issue, and we encourage you to make your voice heard as well, before the next deadline for reply comments on September 10th. Here are some easy ways to contact the FCC and members of Congress and tell them to take the necessary steps to protect net neutrality and all Internet users and developers.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Rizky Ariestiyansyah: Webmaker Party Starts today! Hai Indonesia

Mozilla planet - di, 15/07/2014 - 15:45
Maker Party starts today! FYI, Maker Party is Mozilla’s global campaign to teach the web. Through thousands of community-run events around the world, Maker Party unites educators, organizations and enthusiastic web users with hands-on...
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla’s annual Maker Party begins today!

Mozilla Blog - di, 15/07/2014 - 15:35

Mozilla is thrilled to announce the official kick-off of Maker Party, our annual campaign to teach the culture, mechanics and citizenship of the Web through thousands of community-run events around the world.

Mozilla believes success in the 21st century depends on digital literacy: the skills people need to read, write and participate on the web. Maker Party is all about teaching these skills in a fun, hands-on way.  Participants meet up with others at events of all sizes to explore the how and why of building apps and webpages with code, design, media and interactive elements.

In a recent interview, Mozilla Foundation Executive Director Mark Surman said, “Coding is just the tip of the iceberg. This is about full-scale digital literacy. How to build things with code, design and video and photography. And there are a set of creative, social and cognitive skills — participation, design thinking. These are the skills you need to find your way in the digital world.”

Maker Party is also an example of how engaging learning becomes when it is interest-driven and production-centered, two core principles of an approach called Connected Learning. The approach leverages the advances of the digital age to customize education to the learner — and is being celebrated as part of the Summer to Make, Play and Connect.

You can join Maker Party by finding an event in your area. Events are open to everyone regardless of skill level, and almost all are free!

makerparty_shareablefbimage_launchNo events in your area? Why not host one of your own? Maker Party Resources provides all the information you need to successfully throw an event of any size, from 50+ participants in a library or hackerspace, to just you and your little sister sitting on the living room sofa.

Maker Party runs from July 15 to September 15, 2014. Follow the #MakerParty hashtag on social media to see what people are teaching, learning and making around the world.

Our partners in the 2014 Maker Party include the MacArthur Foundation, the National Writing Project, the Institute of Museum and Library Services, the Association of Science and Technology Centers, the National 4-H Council, Statewide Afterschool Networks, and many more.

Get involved:

  • Press contact: press@mozilla.com
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla Firefox Browser Pitiable Performance Could Make It Next IE - MotoringCrunch

Nieuws verzameld via Google - di, 15/07/2014 - 15:00

Mozilla Firefox Browser Pitiable Performance Could Make It Next IE
MotoringCrunch
User shares on Firefox on all platforms have plunged during the last couple of months as the desktop browser bleeds and any attempts to capture users of smartphone have failed, according to new data. Safari of Apple has been almost as poor since April ...
Rediscovering OperaManila Standard Today
Is Firefox in a Fix?TechNewsWorld (blog)

alle 12 nieuwsartikelen »
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Uganda included in Mozilla digital literacy programme - HumanIPO

Nieuws verzameld via Google - di, 15/07/2014 - 09:30

HumanIPO

Uganda included in Mozilla digital literacy programme
HumanIPO
The Mozilla Foundation will in the next two months have more than 100,000 people participate in learning basic internet use and other digital skills, the Ugandan capital Kampala earmarked as one of the starting points followed by New York, San ...
Mozilla- Comes With Another Innovation.Argyll Free Press

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Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Byron Jones: happy bmo push day!

Mozilla planet - di, 15/07/2014 - 08:40

the following changes have been pushed to bugzilla.mozilla.org:

  • [1029500] bug.attachments shouldn’t include attachment data by default
  • [1032323] canonicalise_query() should omit parameters with empty values so generated URLs are shorter
  • [1027114] When sending error to Sentry for webservice failures, we need to first scrub the username/login/password from the query string
  • [1026586] Using Fira as default font in Bugzilla
  • [1027182] merge-users.pl – SQL to remove bug_user_last_visit not correct
  • [1036268] REST webservice should return http/404 for invalid methods
  • [1027025] comment.creator has no real_name
  • [1036795] comment.raw_text is returned by the bzapi compatibility extension
  • [1036225] Return a link to the REST documentation in “method not found” errors
  • [1036301] change the description of the “bug id” field on bugmail filtering preferences tab to “new bug”
  • [1028269] Firefox OS Pre-load App Info Request Form
  • [1036303] add a list of tracking/project/etc tracking flags to the bugmail filtering prefs page

discuss these changes on mozilla.tools.bmo.


Filed under: bmo, mozilla
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

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