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Adam Lofting: “Conclusions”

Mozilla planet - di, 16/09/2014 - 13:26

Mile long string of baloons (6034077499)

  • Removing the second sentence increases conversion rate (hypothesis = simplicity is good).
  • The button text ‘Go!’ increased the conversion rate.
  • Both variations on the headline increased conversion rate, but ‘Welcome to Webmaker’ performed the best.
  • We should remove the bullet points on this landing page.
  • The log-in option is useful on the page, even for a cold audience who we assume do not have accounts already.
  • Repeating the ask ‘Sign-up for Webmaker’ at the end of the copy, even when it duplicates the heading immediately above, is useful. Even at the expense of making the copy longer.
  • The button text ‘Create an account’ works better than ‘Sign up for Webmaker’ even when the headline and CTA in the copy are ‘Sign up for Webmaker’.
  • These two headlines are equivalent. In the absence of other data we should keep the version which includes the brand name, as it adds one further ‘brand impression’ to the user journey.
  • The existing blue background color is the best variant, given the rest of the page right now.
The Webmaker Testing Hub

If any of those “conclusions” sound interesting to you, you’ll probably want to read more about them on the Webmaker Testing Hub (it’s a fancy name for a list on a wiki).

This is where we’ll try and share the results of any test we run, and document the tests currently running.

And why that image for this blog post?

Because blog posts need and image, and this song came on as I was writing it. And I’m sure it’s a song about statistical significance, or counting, or something…

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Lucas Rocha: Introducing Probe

Mozilla planet - di, 16/09/2014 - 12:32

We’ve all heard of the best practices regarding layouts on Android: keep your view tree as simple as possible, avoid multi-pass layouts high up in the hierarchy, etc. But the truth is, it’s pretty hard to see what’s actually going on in your view tree in each platform traversal (measure → layout → draw).

We’re well served with developer options for tracking graphics performance—debug GPU overdraw, show hardware layers updates, profile GPU rendering, and others. However, there is a big gap in terms of development tools for tracking layout traversals and figuring out how your layouts actually behave. This is why I created Probe.

Probe is a small library that allows you to intercept view method calls during Android’s layout traversals e.g. onMeasure(), onLayout(), onDraw(), etc. Once a method call is intercepted, you can either do extra things on top of the view’s original implementation or completely override the method on-the-fly.

Using Probe is super simple. All you have to do is implement an Interceptor. Here’s an interceptor that completely overrides a view’s onDraw(). Calling super.onDraw() would call the view’s original implementation.

public class DrawGreen extends Interceptor { private final Paint mPaint; public DrawGreen() { mPaint = new Paint(); mPaint.setColor(Color.GREEN); } @Override public void onDraw(View view, Canvas canvas) { canvas.drawPaint(mPaint); } }

Then deploy your Interceptor by inflating your layout with a Probe:

Probe probe = new Probe(this, new DrawGreen(), new Filter.ViewId(R.id.view2)); View root = probe.inflate(R.layout.main_activity, null);

Just to give you an idea of the kind of things you can do with Probe, I’ve already implemented a couple of built-in interceptors. OvermeasureInterceptor tints views according to the number of times they got measured in a single traversal i.e. equivalent to overdraw but for measurement.

LayoutBoundsInterceptor is equivalent to Android’s “Show layout bounds” developer option. The main difference is that you can show bounds only for specific views.

Under the hood, Probe uses Google’s DexMaker to generate dynamic View proxies during layout inflation. The stock ProxyBuilder implementation was not good enough for Probe because I wanted avoid using reflection entirely after the proxy classes were generated. So I created a specialized View proxy builder that generates proxy classes tailored for Probe’s use case.

This means Probe takes longer than your usual LayoutInflater to inflate layout resources. There’s no use of reflection after layout inflation though. Your views should perform the same. For now, Probe is meant to be a developer tool only and I don’t recommend using it in production.

The code is available on Github. As usual, contributions are very welcome.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Expanding Reach in Asia: Telenor Group Brings Firefox OS Smartphones to Bangladesh

Mozilla Blog - di, 16/09/2014 - 08:26
Just weeks after launching the first Firefox OS devices in India, we are pleased to announce Firefox OS is available to more consumers across Asia with today’s launch in Bangladesh. At a press conference in Dhaka, Grameenphone, the local operator … Continue reading
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Byron Jones: happy bmo push day!

Mozilla planet - di, 16/09/2014 - 08:12

the following changes have been pushed to bugzilla.mozilla.org:

  • [1064878] Use of uninitialized value in pattern match (m//) at /loader/0x7ffa9dedc498/Bugzilla/Extension/BugmailFilter/Filter.pm line 172
  • [1020558] Add Involved with Bugs and Never Visited Query to MyDashboard
  • [1062944] Product::Component autocomplete when filing new bug shows disabled components.
  • [1046213] datetime_from() generates wrong dates if year < 1901
  • [1053513] remove last-visited entries when a user removes involvement from a bug
  • [1021902] UI to view a user’s review history
  • [1064678] searching for tracking flag “is empty” is generating incorrect sql
  • [1064329] splinter displays patches that remove lines starting with hyphens incorrectly
  • [1065594] Enable ‘due date’ field in ‘Community Building’ product (all components)
  • [1052851] add the ability to search by “assignee last login date”
  • [1066777] The kick-off form isn’t creating dependent bugs
  • [1039940] serialisation of objects for webservice responses is extremely slow
  • [1058615] New Custom Bugzilla Form Needed For PR Team

discuss these changes on mozilla.tools.bmo.


Filed under: bmo, mozilla
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

William Lachance: mozregression 0.24

Mozilla planet - di, 16/09/2014 - 00:02

I just released mozregression 0.24. This would be a good time to note some of the user-visible fixes / additions that have gone in recently:

  1. Thanks to Sam Garrett, you can now specify a different branch other than inbound to get finer grained regression ranges from. E.g. if you’re pretty sure a regression occurred on fx-team, you can do something like:

    mozregression --inbound-branch fx-team -g 2014-09-13 -b 2014-09-14

  2. Fixed a bug where we could get an incorrect regression range (bug 1059856). Unfortunately the root cause of the bug is still open (it’s a bit tricky to match mozilla-central commits to that of other branches) but I think this most recent fix should make things work in 99.9% of cases. Let me know if I’m wrong.
  3. Thanks to Julien Pagès, we now download the inbound build metadata in parallel, which speeds up inbound bisection quite significantly

If you know a bit of python, contributing to mozregression is a great way to have a high impact on Mozilla. Many platform developers use this project in their day-to-day work, but there’s still lots of room for improvement.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla Open Policy & Advocacy Blog: FCC Reply Comments on Net Neutrality

Mozilla planet - ma, 15/09/2014 - 21:29

Today is the final deadline to file comments as part of the Federal Communications Commission’s open proceeding on net neutrality in the United States. The show of support for real net neutrality over the past six months has been tremendous – so much so that this issue has now received more public comments than any other in FCC history, nearly 1.5 million in total.

Mozilla has been pulling out all the stops as well. In May, we submitted an original petition to the FCC to propose a new path forward on the difficult question of authority, and to shake up a debate that had not seen many new ideas. We’ve also launched global teach-ins, filed comments, and joined last week’s Day of Action, among other activities.

Our reply comments filed today build on these past actions, summarize the state of the debate, and respond to net neutrality opponents. Our comments are structured around four points:

  1. Most parties agree on most issues. The FCC should adopt enforceable rules, including some form of a no blocking and no unreasonable discrimination rule, with an exception for reasonable network management.
  2. Mozilla’s classification theory is a viable and strong path forward. Mozilla’s approach ensures real net neutrality while bypassing the political conversation over reclassification, by articulating a new, not yet classified Title II service offered to remote end points.
  3. The FCC must adopt a presumption against paid prioritization. Allowing prioritization would degrade other uses of the Internet, and thus cause harm to user choice, innovation, and competition.
  4. The same rules should apply to mobile and fixed services. There is one Internet and it must remain open for all. Technical requirements for mobile networks can be protected through reasonable network management.

This week, the FCC will conduct roundtables on net neutrality, with varying focuses including technical, legal, and enforcement aspects. I’ll be participating in one of the Friday sessions, focusing on the topic of enforcement. The roundtables will be held in DC, and will include a moderated discussion among a diversity of viewpoints. At this stage of the process, I don’t expect much in the way of agreement – but at least a range of options will be presented and defended for the agency’s consideration. The public has been invited to submit questions in advance over email or Twitter – roundtables@fcc.gov or #FCCRoundtables – though a caveat from the session description: Your questions and identifying information will be made public and included in the official record.

We’ve seen comments, petitions, roundtables, protests, and events for months now. The main thing left is for the agency to make some decisions – and as we note in our comments, the outcome will set the course for the future of the industry, for better or for worse.

There’s still time for you to make your voice heard. You can contact the FCC and members of Congress, and ask them to protect net neutrality, and the choice, innovation, and freedom enjoyed today by all Internet users and developers.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

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