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Justin Dolske: Foxkeh Dance 2.0

Mozilla planet - mo, 02/04/2018 - 07:49

It’s time for some new Foxkeh dance!

2

10 years ago, when Mozilla was just 10, Alex Polvi made the original foxkehdance.com.

I resurrected it a few years ago, after the original site was lost to domain squatters.

Well, since Mozilla is currently celebrating its 20th anniversary, it felt right to release an update… Foxkeh Dance 2.0!

https://foxkehdance.com/2.0/

Now with more and larger GIFs! Fresher but still annoying background music! And, uhh, a bigger version number! That’s basically it. See you in another 10 years!

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

The Servo Blog: This Week In Servo 110

Mozilla planet - mo, 02/04/2018 - 02:30

In the last week, we merged 66 PRs in the Servo organization’s repositories.

Planning and Status

Our roadmap is available online, including the overall plans for 2018.

This week’s status updates are here.

Notable Additions
  • mrobinson made certain kinds of borders clippable by WebRender.
  • ysimonson ensured that JSON parsing exceptions from the fetch API are propagated.
  • nupurbaghel added support for typed array bodies in XMLHttpRequest.
  • talklittle implemented support for the streaming TextDecoder API.
  • aeweston98 improved the memory reporting for DOM objects that are not part of the DOM tree.
  • modal17 added memory reporting for the HTTP memory cache.
  • csmoe tracked measurements of how long it takes for layout queries to be serviced.
  • marmistrz made handles to GC values safer by including lifetimes in their types.
  • emilio added support for percentage values in column-gap CSS properties.
New Contributors

Interested in helping build a web browser? Take a look at our curated list of issues that are good for new contributors!

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

The Rust Programming Language Blog: Increasing Rust’s Reach 2018

Mozilla planet - mo, 02/04/2018 - 02:00

The Rust team is happy to announce that we’re running our Increasing Rust’s Reach program again this year. Increasing Rust’s Reach is one of several programs run by the project to grow Rust’s community of project collaborators and leaders.

We’re looking for people inside and outside Rust’s current community from groups and backgrounds that are underrepresented in the Rust world and the technology world more generally. We want to partner with you to make Rust a more inclusive, approachable, and impactful project, while supporting your success on personal goals.

This program matches Rust team members from all parts of the project with individuals who are underrepresented in Rust’s community and the tech industry for a partnership of three (3) months, from mid-May to mid-August. Each partnership agrees to a commitment of 3-5 hours per week collaborating on a Rust project.

By way of thanks for participating in the program, we offer a fully paid conference ticket, travel, and accomodations for every participant to a Rust Conference of their choice:

Learn more about the upcoming 2018 Rust Conferences here.

Last year we had 12 participants working on several projects, from contributing to foundational ecosystem libraries like Diesel, to discovery work on a new Rust website, to helping find developer experience and usability holes in the crates.io ecosystem. You can read more about previous participants’ experiences on the brand new Increasing Rust’s Reach website!

Many of the projects we have for this year build on the work that was accomplished last year. However, the primary focus of this year’s project is the 2018 edition release; in particular, the domain working groups that we kicked off with our 2018 Roadmap.

We believe the 2018 edition is a great opportunity, not only to simply get new people involved in the Rust project, but to also demonstrate the huge impact that even newcomers to the project can make. Rust is committed to being a friendly and inclusive project that welcomes new contributors from all sorts of backgrounds—we actively want to be a project that you want to work on, and we’re excited to learn about how we can do that better.

Applications for the program open today, and will run until April 20th. We will announce the recipients on April 30th, and the program will run from May 15th to August 17th. For more details on the timeline, check out the website.

We’re super excited to get your applications! If you have any questions, feel free to reach out to the program committee at reach@rust-lang.org.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla Reps Community: Reps of the Month – February 2018

Mozilla planet - snein, 01/04/2018 - 16:36

Please join us in congratulating Ziggy Maes and Anthony Maton, our Reps of the Month for February 2018!

Ziggy

Ziggy is a long time Mozillian that is involved in organizing our presence at FOSDEM or managing the volunteers at the Mozilla Festival. Together with Anthony he started working on both finding speakers for the DevRoom but also to be sure we have a good presence at the booth too. This work was spread around 3 months so we are definitely grateful for their effort.

Anthony

Anthony is pretty fresh in the Reps role but he has been a Mozillian for a long time now. Part of he Belgium community, he engages with the Francophone community at the same. His latest big effort was organizing Mozilla’s activities at FOSDEM together with Ziggy, both the call for speakers for the DevRoom and our presence at the booth during those two days.

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Thank you Ziggy and Anthony, keep rocking the open Web!

Join us in congratulating them on Discourse!

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Gervase Markham: Happy Birthday, Mozilla

Mozilla planet - sn, 31/03/2018 - 23:17

Mozilla is 20 today. Most of what can be said about that has been ably said by others, some of whom have been involved for even longer than the 18 years I managed. Asa and I started at roughly the same time, but at least Mitchell, Myk and dmose have been around longer and are still involved. (Apologies if I’ve forgotten someone.)

As most of you know, I probably won’t be around to see much more of it, but (this will seem trite if it’s not to seem big-headed!) Mozilla is much more than one or even a few people. There will always be a Mozilla as long as there is an Internet and people who care about people on it. In that vein, let me also say that I’m absolutely delighted with the final outcome of the worldview project. The four items in the addendum to the Manifesto are admirable goals to aim for, and ones I endorse wholeheartedly.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

The Mozilla Blog: Mozilla Turns Twenty

Mozilla planet - sn, 31/03/2018 - 18:29

It’s the morning of March 31, 1998, and the Netscape campus is chock-full of engineers, hours earlier than on a normal day. It’s a Tuesday and it’s known universally in the Netscape browser world as “three thirty-one” and written as 3/31. It’s the day the Mozilla code is open-sourced to the world, and the day the Mozilla Project is formally launched.

Three thirty-one was the result of a massive amount of work in two short months. The intent to make open source the code for “Netscape Navigator” had been announced on January 22. On that date the code was not ready, we didn’t know which free software / open source license we would use, and we didn’t have a structure for running an open source project. That was pure Netscape style.

(For those who came online anytime this century, Netscape Navigator was the product that gave consumers access to the internet for the very first time starting in 1994. Scientists used a command line interface, early adopters used the first browser called Mosaic, and everyone else used Netscape Navigator to access what we called “the World Wide Web.”)

By 3/31 the code had been cleansed of proprietary code owned by others that Netscape couldn’t open source, a new open source license (the Mozilla Public License) had been created and approved by the Open Source Initiative (https://opensource.org/about), and a small band had created “mozilla.org” as the governance body for the new open source project. Here’s the earliest image of the mozilla.org site I can find, from December of 1998:

https://web.archive.org/web/19981212031129/http://www.mozilla.org:80/

Mozilla was not originally intended to create consumer products. It was expected to be a technology development organization that would make technology available to Netscape and others who would build consumer products. Over time we found people liked the development version Mozilla was shipping and we began moving towards producing products rather than technology.

We’ve come a long way since then!

In my wildest dreams I could not have imagined how many people would be drawn to the Mozilla mission and would choose to affiliate with Mozilla in some way. This includes employees, volunteer contributors, “friends of Mozilla” and an ever broader range of people who recognize what Mozilla stands for and want more of this in the world. For me, this is the richest legacy.

There is plenty to do going forward to build a healthier internet that has better human experiences. There’s no detailed map — we’ll build that together. We’ll go forwards, sideways, and in circles. It’s an adventure, and probably not for the faint-hearted. But for those who love the adventure, thrive on change, and want to be remembered for building decent values into great products and programs – for us, there’s no better place to be.

The post Mozilla Turns Twenty appeared first on The Mozilla Blog.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla Turns Twenty

Mozilla Blog - sn, 31/03/2018 - 18:29

It’s the morning of March 31, 1998, and the Netscape campus is chock-full of engineers, hours earlier than on a normal day. It’s a Tuesday and it’s known universally in the Netscape browser world as “three thirty-one” and written as 3/31. It’s the day the Mozilla code is open-sourced to the world, and the day the Mozilla Project is formally launched.

Three thirty-one was the result of a massive amount of work in two short months. The intent to make open source the code for “Netscape Navigator” had been announced on January 22. On that date the code was not ready, we didn’t know which free software / open source license we would use, and we didn’t have a structure for running an open source project. That was pure Netscape style.

(For those who came online anytime this century, Netscape Navigator was the product that gave consumers access to the internet for the very first time starting in 1994. Scientists used a command line interface, early adopters used the first browser called Mosaic, and everyone else used Netscape Navigator to access what we called “the World Wide Web.”)

By 3/31 the code had been cleansed of proprietary code owned by others that Netscape couldn’t open source, a new open source license (the Mozilla Public License) had been created and approved by the Open Source Initiative (https://opensource.org/about), and a small band had created “mozilla.org” as the governance body for the new open source project. Here’s the earliest image of the mozilla.org site I can find, from December of 1998:

https://web.archive.org/web/19981212031129/http://www.mozilla.org:80/

Mozilla was not originally intended to create consumer products. It was expected to be a technology development organization that would make technology available to Netscape and others who would build consumer products. Over time we found people liked the development version Mozilla was shipping and we began moving towards producing products rather than technology.

We’ve come a long way since then!

In my wildest dreams I could not have imagined how many people would be drawn to the Mozilla mission and would choose to affiliate with Mozilla in some way. This includes employees, volunteer contributors, “friends of Mozilla” and an ever broader range of people who recognize what Mozilla stands for and want more of this in the world. For me, this is the richest legacy.

There is plenty to do going forward to build a healthier internet that has better human experiences. There’s no detailed map — we’ll build that together. We’ll go forwards, sideways, and in circles. It’s an adventure, and probably not for the faint-hearted. But for those who love the adventure, thrive on change, and want to be remembered for building decent values into great products and programs – for us, there’s no better place to be.

The post Mozilla Turns Twenty appeared first on The Mozilla Blog.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Asa Dotzler: mozilla.org is 20 years old

Mozilla planet - sn, 31/03/2018 - 09:33

[This is a copy of http://www.mozilla.org/mission.html from launch day]

our mission

Netscape Communications made two important announcements on January 23rd, 1998:

  • First, that the Netscape Communicator product would be available free of charge;
  • Second, that the source code for Communicator would also be free.

On March 31st, the first developer release of the source code to Communicator was made available.

But what now? For the product to grow and mature and continue to be useful and innovative, the various changes made by disparate developers across the web must be collated, organized, and brought together as a cohesive whole.

mozilla.org

A group exists within Netscape that is chartered to act as a clearing-house for the newly-available Netscape source. That group is mozilla.org. We will provide a central point of contact and community for those interested in using or improving the source code:

  • We will collect changes, help authors synchronize their work, and periodically make new source releases which incorporate the best work of the net as a whole.
  • We will operate discussion forums (mailing lists, newsgroups, or whatever seems most appropriate.)
  • We will coordinate bug lists, keep track of and publicize works in progress, and generally attempt to provide “roadmaps” to the code, and to projects based on the code.
  • And we will, above all, be flexible and responsive. We realize that if we are not perceived as providing a useful service, we will become irrelevant, and someone else will take our place.
  • We are not the primary coders. Most of the code that goes into the distribution will be written elsewhere, both within the Netscape Client Engineering group, and, increasingly, out there on the net, at other companies and other development organizations.
  • We are code integrators. And, through our forums, we will try to help people reach consensus, and thereby provide direction and coordination for future improvements.

It can be observed that all successful open-source software projects follow this model of distributed development and centralized integration. One of the fears that open-source software software neophytes often express is that open availability of the source will lead to balkanization, that there will eventually be thousands of different descendants of the original software, and confusion and chaos will result. But, in reality that doesn’t happen; organizations like mozilla.org tend to appear. Eric Raymond tries to explain why in his excellent paper, The Cathedral and the Bazaar. We hope to operate in the “Bazaar” style, and be to the public Netscape source code as Linus Torvalds is to Linux.

Mozilla

“Mozilla” was the original code name for the product that came to be known as Netscape Navigator, and later, Netscape Communicator.

Later, it came to be the name of Netscape Communications Corporation’s dinosaur-like mascot.

Now, we intend to use the name Mozilla as the generic term referring to web browsers derived from the source code of Netscape Navigator.

Netscape Communications Corporation holds trademarks on the names Netscape, Navigator, and Communicator; it has not yet been decided what, if any, restrictions Netscape will place on the use of those names. However, a generic term for browsers is still needed, and “Mozilla” is as good a name as any.

So, Mozilla is a family of web browsers, but not a specific web browser (in biologic terms, Mozilla is a genus; Netscape Communicator is a species.) And mozilla.org (pronounced “Mozilla Dot Org” or “The Mozilla Organization”) is this group of people, the coordinators of the project.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

The Mozilla Blog: A Healthy Internet Needs Trust & Diversity

Mozilla planet - sn, 31/03/2018 - 01:04

Today, Mozilla joined 115 companies in filing a friend of the court brief with the United States Supreme Court to demonstrate our continued opposition to the U.S. travel ban in State of Washington v. Trump.

As we’ve said from the outset, this travel ban threatens the free flow of ideas and innovation across borders that is an essential part of our DNA as a technology company. It also puts in jeopardy our mission to protect and advance the internet as a global public resource that is open and accessible to all.

In a similar filing with the lower circuit court, we outlined these objections along with broader concerns about the disturbing way in which the executive order at the heart of this case erodes trust in U.S. immigration law. We cannot afford to have such a dangerous precedent set that could damage the international cooperation required to develop and maintain the open internet.

Ultimately, we would like the Court to hold that blanket bans targeted at people of particular religions or nationalities are unlawful under the U.S. Constitution and harmfully impact families, businesses, and the global community. We will continue to follow this case and advocate for the free flow of information and ideas across borders, of which travel is a key part.

The post A Healthy Internet Needs Trust & Diversity appeared first on The Mozilla Blog.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

A Healthy Internet Needs Trust & Diversity

Mozilla Blog - sn, 31/03/2018 - 01:04

Today, Mozilla joined 115 companies in filing a friend of the court brief with the United States Supreme Court to demonstrate our continued opposition to the U.S. travel ban in State of Washington v. Trump.

As we’ve said from the outset, this travel ban threatens the free flow of ideas and innovation across borders that is an essential part of our DNA as a technology company. It also puts in jeopardy our mission to protect and advance the internet as a global public resource that is open and accessible to all.

In a similar filing with the lower circuit court, we outlined these objections along with broader concerns about the disturbing way in which the executive order at the heart of this case erodes trust in U.S. immigration law. We cannot afford to have such a dangerous precedent set that could damage the international cooperation required to develop and maintain the open internet.

Ultimately, we would like the Court to hold that blanket bans targeted at people of particular religions or nationalities are unlawful under the U.S. Constitution and harmfully impact families, businesses, and the global community. We will continue to follow this case and advocate for the free flow of information and ideas across borders, of which travel is a key part.

The post A Healthy Internet Needs Trust & Diversity appeared first on The Mozilla Blog.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Cameron Kaiser: Stuff spotted in Ready Player One

Mozilla planet - fr, 30/03/2018 - 13:33
Saw Ready Player One tonight with my wife and the bro-and-sis-in-law in 3D. Capsule review: if you loved the 80s, you'll love this movie, but if you only liked the 80s you'll feel like you're being subtly manipulated. But, despite being silly and overly gamer-y, it's cute and fun, and looks pretty good. It's worth at least a matinee.

We spent a lot of time spotting old hardware in it. An Atari VCS is a major part of the plot, but we also saw a ColecoVision, though both were simulated. There were a number of old arcade cabinets, notably a Pinball 2000 Revenge From Mars. In the Macintosh world, a possibly anachronistic Macintosh LC series machine (we couldn't determine the model) turns up along with an unknown early PC which sort of resembles a Tandy 1000 of some kind. However, the real oddball was what I'm pretty sure was a Commodore 1570 disk drive. These are rather unusual and it wouldn't make sense for one to be in the United States around that time period. Watch for it in Halliday's bedroom with the unknown LC near the end of the film.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

The Firefox Frontier: Meet the Add-ons Manager

Mozilla planet - to, 29/03/2018 - 20:04

Ever wanted to fancy up your Firefox experience but weren’t sure how to do it? Are you familiar with the Add-ons Manager in Firefox? If not, please allow us to … Read more

The post Meet the Add-ons Manager appeared first on The Firefox Frontier.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

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