mozilla

Mozilla Nederland LogoDe Nederlandse
Mozilla-gemeenschap

Will Kahn-Greene: Socorro: 2018q3 review

Mozilla planet - ma, 01/10/2018 - 15:00
Summary

Socorro is the crash ingestion pipeline for Mozilla's products like Firefox. When Firefox crashes, the Breakpad crash reporter asks the user if the user would like to send a crash report. If the user answers "yes!", then the Breakpad crash reporter collects data related to the crash, generates a crash report, and submits that crash report as an HTTP POST to Socorro. Socorro saves the crash report, processes it, and provides an interface for aggregating, searching, and looking at crash reports.

2018q3 was a busy quarter. This blog post covers what happened.

Read more… (7 mins to read)

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Daniel Pocock: Stelvio, Mortirolo, Simplon and hacking Tiramisu

Mozilla planet - ma, 01/10/2018 - 09:24

On Friday the adventure continued. A pit stop for fresh tyres and then north to the renowned Stelvio Pass, 2757m a.s.l., 75 challenging hairpin corners. There are plenty of helmet-cam videos of this ride online.

Mortirolo Pass

After Stelvio, I had to head south and the most direct route suggested by OpenStreetmap took me over the Mortirolo pass.

Dinner

At the end of all that, I had to hack my own Tiramisu but like the mountain passes, it was worth the effort:

Simplon Pass

Returned home using the Simplon Pass. It is a relatively easy road compared to the others, with nice views at the top and along the route.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Nick Fitzgerald: SFHTML5 Rust and WebAssembly Talk

Mozilla planet - ma, 01/10/2018 - 09:00

I gave a talk about Rust and WebAssembly for SFHTML5’s “All About WebAssembly” meetup. You can find the slide deck here. Use your arrow keys to cycle through the slides. Video recording embedded below.

You can watch the other (great!) talks from the meetup in this playlist.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla Open Policy & Advocacy Blog: Contributing to the European Commission’s review of digital competition

Mozilla planet - za, 29/09/2018 - 01:16

Following on the heels of our submission to the U.S. Federal Trade Commission last month, we have submitted a written filing to the European Commission Directorate-General for Competition, as part of a public consultation in advance of the Commission’s forthcoming January 2019 conference on competition challenges in the digital era. In our filing, we focus on two specific, related issues: the difficulty of measuring competitive harm in a data-powered and massively vertically integrated digital ecosystem, and the role played by interoperability (in particular, through technical interfaces known as APIs) in powering the internet as we know it.

Mozilla’s Internet Health Report 2018 explored concentration of power and centralization online through a spotlight article, “Too big tech?” The software and services offered by a few companies are entangled with virtually every part of our lives. These companies reached their market positions in part through massive innovation and investment, and they created extremely popular (and lucrative) user experiences. But we are headed today down a path of excessive centralisation and control, where someday the freedom to code and compete will be realised in full only for those who work for a few large corporations.

Our submission examines modern digital competition through the following key considerations:

  1. Increasing centralisation poses competition concerns;
  2. Traditional metrics and tools are insufficient to promote competition;
  3. Interoperability is a powerful, ready-to-use key to unlock competition in the tech sector; and
  4. Changes to law, policy, and practice regarding internet competition should be grounded in technology and built to benefit all internet users and businesses.

The EU has a well established track record in enforcing competition in digital markets. We encourage the Commission to continue its leadership by embracing interoperability as a core principle in its approach to digital competition. If the future of the internet stays grounded in standards and built out through an ecosystem of transparent third-party accessible APIs, we can preserve the digital platform economy as a springboard for our collective social and economic welfare, rather than watching it evolve into an oligarchy of gatekeepers over our data.

The post Contributing to the European Commission’s review of digital competition appeared first on Open Policy & Advocacy.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla VR Blog: Hubs by Mozilla: Immersive Communication on Any Device

Mozilla planet - vr, 28/09/2018 - 22:45
 Immersive Communication on Any Device

Hubs by Mozilla lets people meet in a shared 360-environment using just their browser. Hubs works on any device from head-mounted displays like HTC Vive to 2D devices like laptops and mobile phones. Using WebVR, a JavaScript API, Mozilla is making virtual interactions with avatars accessible via Firefox and other browser that people use every day.

In the course of building the first online social platform for VR and AR on the web, Mozilla wanted confirm it was building a platform that would bring people together and do so in a low-friction, safe, and scalable way. With her years of experience and seminal studies examining the successes and pitfalls of social VR systems across the ecosystem, Jessica Outlaw and Tyesha Snow of The Extended Mind, set out to generate insights about the user experience and deliver recommendations of how to improve the Hubs product.

BACKGROUND ON THE RESEARCH STUDY
In July 2018, The Extended Mind recruited five pairs of people (10 total) to come to their office in Portland, OR and demo Hubs on their own laptops, tablets, and mobile phone. We provided them with head-mounted displays (HTC Vive, Oculus Rift & Go) to use as well.

 Immersive Communication on Any Device

Users were a relatively tech savvy crowd and represented a range of professions from 3D artist and engineer to realtor and psychologist. Participants in the study were all successful in entering Hubs from every device and had a lot of fun exploring the virtual environment with their companion’s avatar. Some of the participants in their early twenties also made a point to say that Hubs was better than texting or a phone call because:

“This makes it easier to talk because there are visual cues.”

And…

“Texting doesn’t capture our full [expression]”

In this series blog posts, The Extended Mind researchers will cover some of the research findings about the first-time user experience of trying Hubs. There are some surprising findings about how the environment shaped user behavior and best practices for usability in virtual reality to share across the industry.

BROWSER BASED VR (NO APP INSTALL REQUIRED)
Today, the focus is on how the accessibility of Hubs via a browser differentiates it from other social VR apps as well as other 2D communication apps like Skype, BlueJeans, and Zoom.

The process for creating a room and inviting a friend begins at hubs.mozilla.com. Once there, participants generated a link to their private room and then copied and pasted that link into their existing communication apps, such as iMessage or e-mail.

Once their companion received the link, they followed instructions and met the person who invited them in a 360-environment. This process worked for HMDs, computers, and mobile phone. When participants were asked afterward about the ease of use of Hubs, accessibility via link was listed as a top benefit.

“It’s pretty cool that it’s as easy as copy and pasting a link.”

And

“I’m very accustomed to virtual spaces having their own menu and software boot up and whole process to get to, but you open a link. That’s really cool. Simple.”

Some believed that because links are already familiar to most people, they would be able to persuade their less technologically sophisticated friends & family members to meet them in Hubs.

Another benefit of using the browser is that there is already one installed on people’s electronic devices. Obstacles to app installation range from difficulty finding them in the app store, to lack of space on a hard drive. One person noted that IT must approve any app she installs on her work computer. With Hubs, she could use it right away and wouldn’t need to jump that hurdle.

Because Hubs relies on people’s existing mental models of how hyperlinks work, only requires an internet browser (meaning no app installation), and is accessible from an XR or 2D device it the most accessible communication platform today. It could possibly be the first digital experience that people have which gets them familiar with the with the concepts of 360 virtual spaces and interacting with avatars, which subsequently launches them into further exploration of virtual and extended reality.

Now that you've got a sense of the capabilities of Hubs, the next blog posts will cover more specific findings of how people used it for conversation and how the environment shaped interections.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Support.Mozilla.Org: Support Localization – Top 50 Sprint and More

Mozilla planet - vr, 28/09/2018 - 22:22
Hello, current and future Mozillians!

I hope you can still remember that last month we kicked off a “Top 20 Sprint” for several locales available on the Support site. You can read more about the reasons behind it here and the way it had been going here.

In September, the goal has been extended to include a wider batch of articles that quality into the “Top 50” – that is, the 50 most popular Knowledge Base articles globally. You can see their list on this dashboard: https://support.mozilla.org/en-US/contributors/kb-overview

I wanted to share with you the progress our community has made over the last weeks and call out those who have contributed towards Mozilla’s broader linguistic coverage of support content, making all the possible versions of Firefox easier to use for millions of international users.

Arabic After the impressive 1st milestone rush by Ahmad, the torch has been picked up by FFus3r, who has been working for the last few weeks on adding new and updated versions of Knowledge Base articles through the Arabic dashboard. شكرا لكم! Bengali

Another case of passing the work on successfully, this time for Bengali localizers. We’ve had Nazir working hard on the Top 20 articles at first in August, and now we have S M Sarwar Nobin leading the charge in September. I also hear there’s an event for the Bengali community happening soon, so stay tuned for more details from that side of the world :)

Bosnian

Bosnian localizers have been quiet for a while now, so I hope we can hear from kicin again soon, as there is still time to add more content in that locale to our Knowledge Base.

Gujarati

Similarly to Bosnian, there’s not a lot of action taking place in the Gujarati part of the Knowledge Base, but hopefully we can see the localizers rally once more to reach the Top 50 goal soon.

Hindi

Hindi localizers have continued to contribute to the Knowledge Base, but with slightly diminished contributions, there’s still space for more contributions! If you know Hindi and want to join forces with Mahtab and Ritesh Raj, now is the time!

Tamil

It seems that the Tamil side of the Knowledge Base will have to wait for better days and more contributors with energy and time to spare. Here’s to hoping we can see that happen soon!

Telugu

To finish off the sprint part for the “magnificent 7” locales that responded postively to my summer call to action on a high note, I am happy to report that చిలాబు, sandeep, and Dinesh have continued improving the Knowledge Base with their translations and are well on the way of hitting the Top 50 articles if they keep up. ధన్యవాదాలు!

More news from all localizers of the above locales soon… While we wrap up September and move into October.

In the meantime, many other contributors have kept their parts of the Knowledge Base busy and updated… I would like to call out a few of them and thank them on behalf of the millions of users benefiting from their shared enthusiasm and knowledge.

The Czech team of soucet and Michal Stanke keep churning out update after update. Same goes for the Danish tag team of Joergen and Kim Ludvigsen. The unstoppable Artist makes most of the German Knowledge Base possible, together with graba.

Greek Firefox users have a lot to thank Jim Spentzos for, while those who prefer to use Spanish while browsing our site can enjoy high quality content coming from Ángela Velo (with us since 2012!). Jarmo is still looking for more people to help out with Finnish, but that does not stop him from contributing additional translations. The French language is proudly (and efficiently) supported by Mozinet, Cécile, YD, J2m06, Goofy , and Olpouin (a recent addition to the mix there – hello!).

Hungarian localizers Meskó Balázs and Kéménczy Kálmán slowly but steadily enable and improve the Knowledge Base for users over the blue Danube, while  Underpass and Michele Rodaro do the same for users on both shored of Tiber (and way beyond).

Over in Japan, dskmori (also active in Korean!), kenyama, hamasaki, and marsf provide great content for users who seem to (on average) spend the most time on each page they visit. Georgianizator is slowly working through the (obviously) Georgian (also known as Kartuli) Knowledge Base. For Korea, Narae Kim and seulgi work together with dskmori on more updates.

Tonnes (another localization MozGiant, active in the Knowledge Base – and not only – since 2010!) makes Dutch happen, while for Polish we have TyDraniu and Teo. MozBrazilians continue supporting their huge userbase through the work ofJhonatas Rodrigues, Marcelo Ghelman, leorockbar, and wikena (another new name, hello!). Their tireless Portuguese counterparts on the other side of the ocean are Alberto Castro, ManSil and Cláudio Esperança, while over on the other side of Europe, the Russian trio of Valery Ledovskoy, Anticisco Freeman, and Harry is echoing the hard work of other localizers in the Cyrillic script. kusavica and marcel11 keep clarifying Firefox in their own words for Slovak users, just like Lan and Rok do for Slovenians. The Turkish language is represented and supported by Burhan Keleş, SUNR, OmTi, and Selim Şumlu. To wrap the long list of contributors up, we have Bor, ChenYJ, wxie, Yang Hanlin and xiaolu contributing for the benefit of all our Chinese users. Each one of the people listed above helps countless others through their contributions to the open and helpful web that Mozilla is a part of. Adding their energy and skills to the language rainbow of the web, they help keep the web beautiful in its variety of cultures represented through modern and living languages. Thank you all and may your weekend be unforgettable! Keep rocking the helpful web!
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Firefox Nightly: The Developer Toolbar (or GCLI) is no longer in DevTools

Mozilla planet - vr, 28/09/2018 - 18:33

The DevTools GCLI has been removed from the Firefox codebase (bug), which roughly translates into 20k less lines of code to think about, and the associated tests which are not running anymore, so yay for saving both brain and automation power!

We triaged all the existing bugs, and moved a bunch worth keeping to DevTools → Shared Components, to avoid losing track of them (they’re mostly about taking screenshots). Then the ever helpful Emma resolved the rest as incomplete, and moved the component to the DevTools Graveyard in Bugzilla, to avoid people filing bugs about code that does not exist anymore.

During this removal process we’ve heard from some of you that you miss certain features from GCLI, and we’ve taken note, and will aim to bring them back when time and resourcing allow. In the meantime, thank you for your feedback! It helps us better understand how you use the tools.

We also want to thank Eric Meyer for his everlasting appreciation of the screenshot feature, and his continuous dedication to making sure the world knows about this feature over the years. Thank you!

PS For background on why we removed it, you can read the initial intent to unship email.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

The Mozilla Blog: 25,000 Americans Urge Venmo to Update Its Privacy Settings

Mozilla planet - do, 27/09/2018 - 15:00
Also: A new Mozilla-Ipsos poll reveals a majority of respondents want privacy, and not publicity, as their default setting online

 

Earlier this week, Mozilla visited Venmo’s headquarters in New York City and delivered a petition signed by more than 25,000 Americans. The petition urges the payment app to put users’ privacy first and make Venmo transactions private by default.

Also this week: A new poll from Mozilla and Ipsos reveals that 77% of respondents believe payment apps should not make transaction details public by default. (More on our poll results below.)

Millions of Venmo users’ spending habits are available for anyone to see. That’s because Venmo transactions are currently public by default — unless users manually update their settings, anyone, anywhere can see whom they’re sending money to, and why.

Mozilla’s petition urges Venmo to change these settings. By making privacy the default, Venmo can better protect its seven million users — and send a powerful message about the importance of privacy. But so far, Venmo hasn’t formally responded to our petition and to the 25,000 Americans who signed their names.

Earlier this year, Mozilla Fellow Hang Do Thi Duc exposed the serious implications of Venmo’s settings. Her project, Public By Default, revealed how Venmo users’ drug habits, junk food vices, personal finances, and fights with significant others are available for all to see. Here’s what TV reporters had to say about Hang’s findings:

 

Mozilla and Ipsos conducted an opinion poll this month, asking 1,009 Americans how they feel about the policy of “public by default.” Americans’ opinions were clear:

77% of respondents believe payment apps should not make transaction details public by default.

92% of respondents do not support Venmo’s justification for making transactions public by default. (In July, Venmo told CNET that transactions should be public because “it’s fun to share [information] with friends in the social world.”)

89% of respondents believe the most responsible default setting for payment apps is for transactions to be visible only to those involved.

Find the full poll results here.

The post 25,000 Americans Urge Venmo to Update Its Privacy Settings appeared first on The Mozilla Blog.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

25,000 Americans Urge Venmo to Update Its Privacy Settings

Mozilla Blog - do, 27/09/2018 - 15:00
Also: A new Mozilla-Ipsos poll reveals a majority of respondents want privacy, and not publicity, as their default setting online

 

Earlier this week, Mozilla visited Venmo’s headquarters in New York City and delivered a petition signed by more than 25,000 Americans. The petition urges the payment app to put users’ privacy first and make Venmo transactions private by default.

Also this week: A new poll from Mozilla and Ipsos reveals that 77% of respondents believe payment apps should not make transaction details public by default. (More on our poll results below.)

Millions of Venmo users’ spending habits are available for anyone to see. That’s because Venmo transactions are currently public by default — unless users manually update their settings, anyone, anywhere can see whom they’re sending money to, and why.

Mozilla’s petition urges Venmo to change these settings. By making privacy the default, Venmo can better protect its seven million users — and send a powerful message about the importance of privacy. But so far, Venmo hasn’t formally responded to our petition and to the 25,000 Americans who signed their names.

Earlier this year, Mozilla Fellow Hang Do Thi Duc exposed the serious implications of Venmo’s settings. Her project, Public By Default, revealed how Venmo users’ drug habits, junk food vices, personal finances, and fights with significant others are available for all to see. Here’s what TV reporters had to say about Hang’s findings:

 

Mozilla and Ipsos conducted an opinion poll this month, asking 1,009 Americans how they feel about the policy of “public by default.” Americans’ opinions were clear:

77% of respondents believe payment apps should not make transaction details public by default.

92% of respondents do not support Venmo’s justification for making transactions public by default. (In July, Venmo told CNET that transactions should be public because “it’s fun to share [information] with friends in the social world.”)

89% of respondents believe the most responsible default setting for payment apps is for transactions to be visible only to those involved.

Find the full poll results here.

The post 25,000 Americans Urge Venmo to Update Its Privacy Settings appeared first on The Mozilla Blog.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla GFX: WebRender newsletter #23

Mozilla planet - do, 27/09/2018 - 14:37

Bonjour everyone! Here comes the twenty third installment of WebRender’s very best newsletter. This time I’m trying something a bit different. Instead of going through each pull request and bugzilla entry that landed since the last post, I’m only sourcing information from the team’s weekly meeting. As a result only the most important items make it to the list and not all items have links to their bug or pull request. Doing this allows me to spend considerably less time preparing the newsletter and will hopefully help with publishing it more often.

Last time I mentioned WebRender being enabled on nightly by default for a small subset of the users, focusing on nVidia desktop GPUs on Windows 10. I’m happy to report that we didn’t set our nightly user population on fire and that WebRender is still enabled in these configurations (as expected, sure, but with a project as large and ambitious as WebRender it isn’t something that could be taken for granted). The choice of this particular configuration of hardware and driver led to a lot of speculation online, so I just want clarify a few things. We did not strike any deal with nVidia. nVidia didn’t send engineers to help us get WebRender to work on their hardware first. No politics, I promise. We learnt from past mistakes and chose to target a small population of Firefox users at first specifically because it is small. Each combination of OS/Vendor/driver exposes its own set of bugs and a progressive and targeted rollout means we’ll be better equipped to react in a timely manner to incoming bugs than we have been with past projects.
Worry not, the end game is for WebRender to be Firefox’s rendering engine for everyone. Until then, are welcome to enable WebRender manually if your OS, hardware or driver isn’t in the initial target.

Notable changes in WebRender and Gecko
  • Bobby improved the memory reporting infrastructure for WebRender.
  • Bobby improved memory usage by better managing the lifetime of the render target pool items.
  • Bobby fixed a crash with clip masks.
  • Jeff Improved the performance of blob image rasterization.
  • Chris Fixed some pixels snapping issues.
  • Kvark Fixed a 3D transform rendering bug and redacted his investigation in the form of a tutorial. It’s a a very entertaining read!
  • Kvark brought back the use of texelFecth in vertex shaders.
  • Matt improved the performance of the scene building phase by pre-allocating memory.
  • Andrew avoided rasterizing vector images many times at similar sizes which caused performance issues on some pages.
  • Andrew improved the memory reporting of shared surfaces.
  • Andrew improved memory usage by unmapping the remaining shared surfaces of a pipeline when the latter is removed.
  • Lee finished implementing font variations for Windows.
  • Glenn improved gradient rendering performance.
  • Glenn introduced an interning data structure which will help with caching more resources across display lists.
  • Glenn improved the performance of clipping when scaling transformations are involved.
  • Glenn fixed some crashes.
  • Nical avoided building the frame twice each time a scene is built.
  • Nical prevented background tabs from blocking the UI in some cases.
  • Nical integrated the tab switching mechanism with WebRender.
  • Nical fixed a race condition between blob image rasterization and texture uploads.
  • Nical fixed some crashes.
  • Sotaro fixed incorrect ordering of transactions for video frames.
  • Markus assisted various people with investigating and fixing WebRender bugs.
  • Jean-Yves added support for 10/12 buts YUV images.
  • Patrick fixed some artifacts caused by the way we down-scale when blurring.
  • Emilio fixed a bug with border caching.
  • Emilio fixed a bug related to snapping and clips.
Enabling WebRender in Firefox Nightly
  • In about:config set “gfx.webrender.all” to true,
  • restart Firefox.
Reporting bugs

The best place to report bugs related to WebRender in Gecko is the Graphics :: WebRender component in bugzilla.
Note that it is possible to log in with a github account.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Niko Matsakis: October Office Hour Slots

Mozilla planet - do, 27/09/2018 - 06:00

Just a quick note that the October 2018 office hour slots are now posted. If you’re having a problem with Rust, or have something you’d like to talk out, please sign up!

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla Open Policy & Advocacy Blog: A mixed bag: Mozilla reacts to the Indian Supreme Court’s landmark verdict on Aadhaar

Mozilla planet - wo, 26/09/2018 - 20:44

By holding Section 57 of the Aadhaar Act to be unconstitutional, the Supreme Court of India has recognized the privacy risks created by the indiscriminate use of Aadhaar for private services. While this is welcome, by allowing the State wide powers to make Aadhaar mandatory for welfare subsidies and PAN, this judgment falls short of guaranteeing Indians meaningful choice on whether and how to use Aadhaar. This is especially worrisome given that India still lacks a data protection law to regulate government or private use of personal data. Now, more than ever, we need legal protections that will hold the government to account.

 

The post A mixed bag: Mozilla reacts to the Indian Supreme Court’s landmark verdict on Aadhaar appeared first on Open Policy & Advocacy.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

The Firefox Frontier: Firefox Accounts offer recovery key option

Mozilla planet - wo, 26/09/2018 - 18:25

Firefox Accounts help you get more out of your Firefox experience. With a Firefox Account, you can get all your bookmarks, passwords, open tabs and more — everywhere you use … Read more

The post Firefox Accounts offer recovery key option appeared first on The Firefox Frontier.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla Cloud Services Blog: Account recovery keys in Firefox Accounts

Mozilla planet - wo, 26/09/2018 - 17:52

The Firefox Accounts team is in the process of releasing a new feature called Account Recovery. Previously, when a user resets their password, they would be given new encryption keys and could potentially risk losing any synced bookmarks, passwords and browsing history. With Account Recovery, a user can keep their encryption keys and not lose any data.

A more technical overview of how this feature works can be found here.

If you are interested in trying it out, simply goto your Firefox Account settings and click Account Recovery. If you do not see the Account Recovery option, you might not be in the rollout group yet. However, it can be manually enabled using these instructions.

From panel, click Generate, confirm your password and save the key displayed.

In the event you forget your password, you will be prompted for this key to recover your data.

Thanks and kudos to our security team, designers, developers, testers and everyone else that helped to make this feature happen!

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla Open Policy & Advocacy Blog: EU Code published: another step forward in the fight against disinformation

Mozilla planet - wo, 26/09/2018 - 17:15

Today, the advertising and technology sectors presented the world’s first ever Code of Practice on Disinformation. Brokered in Europe, and motivated by the European Commission’s Communication on Tackling Disinformation and the report of the High Level Expert Group on Fake News, the Code represents another step towards countering the spread of disinformation.

This initiative complements the work we’ve been doing at Mozilla to invest in technologies and tools, research and communities, to fight against information pollution and honour our commitment to an internet that elevates critical thinking, reasoned argument, shared knowledge, and verifiable facts.

The Code is the result of intensive work within the  advertising and online platform sectors, including Google, Facebook, Twitter, Mozilla, and EDiMA, as well as IAB Europe, the World Federation of Advertisers, and EACA, EASA, and AIM. These organisations comprised the Working Group, which worked on the code within the Multistakeholder Forum on Disinformation, a process established and shepherded by the European Commission.

Building on the approach outlined in the High Level Group’s Report, the Code addresses five key areas and outlines a set of commitments for each. These include:

  • Scrutiny of ad placements: to deploy policies and processes to disrupt advertising and monetisation incentives for purveyors of disinformation;
  • Political and issue-based advertising: to enable public disclosure of political ads, and to work towards a common understanding of “issue-based advertising” and how to address it;
  • Integrity of services: to put in place – and enforce – clear policies related to the misuse of automated bots;
  • Empowering consumers: to invest in products, technologies, and programs to help people identify information that may be false, to develop and implement trust indicators; and to support efforts to improve critical thinking and digital media literacy; and
  • Empowering the research community: to strengthen collaboration with the research and fact checking communities and encourage good faith independent efforts to understand and track disinformation.

These key commitments are a good baseline for further work, and we’re hopeful this Code will serve to drive change in the platform and advertising sectors, and complement parallel approaches to tackle this issue. Of course, as with any law, policy, or joint initiative, the proof of its effectiveness will be in the implementation.

As we’ve underlined previously, disinformation is often legal content; it is crucial not to put private companies in the role of assessing truthfulness, nor should it be left to a government entity. This code achieves that balance by not encroaching on fundamental rights such as free expression and the right to privacy, while still outlining steps that companies should take to thwart disinformation.

The Code process isn’t quite finished — in early October the Commission plans to host an event where the Working Group members will officially sign the code and present a roadmap of actions to be carried out over the next year.

We are thankful for the diligence of those involved, and we look forward to finalising this process with the European Commission and our community to apply this Code in practice.

Find the Code and Annex of best practices here, and the statement of the Working Group here.

The post EU Code published: another step forward in the fight against disinformation appeared first on Open Policy & Advocacy.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Pagina's