mozilla

Mozilla Nederland LogoDe Nederlandse
Mozilla-gemeenschap

Air Mozilla: Reps Weekly Meeting, 15 Feb 2018

Mozilla planet - do, 15/02/2018 - 17:00

Reps Weekly Meeting This is a weekly call with some of the Reps to discuss all matters about/affecting Reps and invite Reps to share their work with everyone.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Air Mozilla: Reps Weekly Meeting, 15 Feb 2018

Mozilla planet - do, 15/02/2018 - 17:00

Reps Weekly Meeting This is a weekly call with some of the Reps to discuss all matters about/affecting Reps and invite Reps to share their work with everyone.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mozilla VR Blog: Create VR on the Web using Unity 3D

Mozilla planet - do, 15/02/2018 - 02:05
Create VR on the Web using Unity 3D

We are happy to announce Mozilla's latest tool for creating VR content, Unity 3D WebVR Assets. It is free to download and available now on the Unity Asset Store. This tool allows creators to publish VR experiences created in Unity and shared on the open Web, with the power of a URL or link. These experiences can then be viewed with any WebVR-enabled browser such as Firefox (using the Oculus Rift or HTC VIVE) and Microsoft Edge (using a Windows Mixed Reality headset).

Create VR on the Web using Unity 3D

With the release of this asset package, we hope to bridge the frictionless distribution, ease of use, and accessibility of the Web with the best-in-class content-creation tools from Unity. We believe WebVR is a great fit for demos, marketing, news content, and any case where traditional application flows may be too time-consuming or troublesome for users.

Since the assets utilize the standards-based WebVR API, it removes the need for any platform-specific SDKs and provides the ability to be responsive to different VR configurations. This enables the creation of experiences that can scale to different requirements, including everything from basic, desktop-based, non-VR environments (for example, using First-Person-Shooter-style controls) to fully immersive, room-scale, and motion-controlled VR configurations (for the HTC VIVE, Oculus Rift, and Windows Mixed Reality headsets).

Using the WebVR Assets package

Create VR on the Web using Unity 3D

Getting started couldn’t be easier! From within Unity, launch the Asset Store and search for WebVR to find the WebVR Assets package.

WebVR Assets in action. A Unity game ported to WebVR.


For full instructions on how to use these assets with your content, check out the Getting Started guide.

We want to hear from you!

We’d love to hear about what you come up with using the WebVR-Assets. Share your work with us and use the #unitywebvr Twitter hashtag.

Brought to you by Mozilla, the Unity WebVR Assets is an open-source project (licensed under Apache 2) available on GitHub.

Reach out to us with any questions you may have or help you may need, and participate in the discussions on the WebVR Slack in the #unity channel.

Credits

This project was heavily influenced by early explorations in using Unity to build for WebVR by @gtk2k.

Also, thanks to @arturitu for creating the 3D-hand models used for controllers in these examples.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

The Rust Programming Language Blog: Announcing Rust 1.24

Mozilla planet - do, 15/02/2018 - 01:00

The Rust team is happy to announce a new version of Rust, 1.24.0. Rust is a systems programming language focused on safety, speed, and concurrency.

If you have a previous version of Rust installed via rustup, getting Rust 1.24.0 is as easy as:

$ rustup update stable

If you don’t have it already, you can get rustup from the appropriate page on our website, and check out the detailed release notes for 1.24.0 on GitHub.

What’s in 1.24.0 stable

This release contains two very exciting new features: rustfmt and incremental compilation!

rustfmt

For years now, we’ve wanted a tool that automatically can reformat your Rust code to some sort of “standard style.” With this release, we’re happy to announce that a preview of rustfmt can be used with 1.24 stable. To give it a try, do this:

$ rustup component add rustfmt-preview

There are two important aspects here: first, you’re using rustup component add instead of cargo install here. If you’ve previously used rustfmt via cargo install, you should uninstall it first. Second, this is a preview, as it says in the name. rustfmt is not at 1.0 yet, and some stuff is being tweaked, and bugs are being fixed. Once rustfmt hits 1.0, we’ll be releasing a rustfmt component and deprecating rustfmt-preview.

In the near future, we plan on writing a post about this release strategy, as it’s big enough for its own post, and is broader than just this release.

For more, please check out rustfmt on GitHub.

Incremental compilation

Back in September of 2016 (!!!), we blogged about Incremental Compilation. While that post goes into the details, the idea is basically this: when you’re working on a project, you often compile it, then change something small, then compile again. Historically, the compiler has compiled your entire project, no matter how little you’ve changed the code. The idea with incremental compilation is that you only need to compile the code you’ve actually changed, which means that that second build is faster.

As of Rust 1.24, this is now turned on by default. This means that your builds should get faster! Don’t forget about cargo check when trying to get the lowest possible build times.

This is still not the end story for compiler performance generally, nor incremental compilation specifically. We have a lot more work planned in the future. For example, another change related to performance hit stable this release: codegen-units is now set to 16 by default. One small note about this change: it makes builds faster, but makes the final binary a bit slower. For maximum speed, setting codegen-units to 1 in your Cargo.toml is needed to eke out every last drop of performance.

More to come!

Other good stuff

There’s one other change we’d like to talk about here: undefined behavior. Rust generally strives to minimize undefined behavior, having none of it in safe code, and as little as possible in unsafe code. One area where you could invoke UB is when a panic! goes across an FFI boundary. In other words, this:

extern "C" fn panic_in_ffi() { panic!("Test"); }

This cannot work, as the exact mechanism of how panics work would have to be reconciled with how the "C" ABI works, in this example, or any other ABI in other examples.

In Rust 1.24, this code will now abort instead of producing undefined behavior.

See the detailed release notes for more.

Library stabilizations

If you’re a fan of str::find, which is used to find a given char inside of a &str, you’ll be happy to see this pull request: it’s now 10x faster! This is thanks to memchr. [u8]::contains uses it too, though it doesn’t get such an extreme speedup.

Additionally, a few new APIs were stabilized this release:

Finally, these functions may now be used inside a constant expression, for example, to initialize a static:

  • Cell, RefCell, and UnsafeCell’s new functions
  • The new functions of the various Atomic integer types
  • {integer}::min_value and max_value
  • mem’s size_of and align_of
  • ptr::null and null_mut

See the detailed release notes for more.

Cargo features

The big feature of this release was turning on incremental compilation by default, as mentioned above.

See the detailed release notes for more.

Contributors to 1.24.0

Many people came together to create Rust 1.24. We couldn’t have done it without all of you. Thanks!

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Mike Conley: Firefox Performance Update #1

Mozilla planet - wo, 14/02/2018 - 22:34

In an attempt to fill the shoes of Ehsan’s excellent Quantum Flow Newsletters1, I’ve started to keep track of interesting performance bugs that have been tackled over the past little while.

I don’t expect I’ll be able to put together such excellent essays on performance issues in Firefox, but I can certainly try to help to raise the profile of folks helping to make Firefox faster.

Expect these to come out pretty regularly, especially as we continue to press our performance advantage over the competition. Maybe I’ll come up with a catchy title, too!

Anyhow, here’s the stuff that’s gone by recently that I’m pretty stoked about, performance-wise! To everybody in this list – thanks for making Firefox faster!

  1. Like this one! Check out Ehsan’s blog for the rest of the series. 

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Firefox Test Pilot: Welcome Marnie to the Test Pilot Team!

Mozilla planet - wo, 14/02/2018 - 22:13

Late last year, the Test Pilot team welcomed a new engineering program manager, Marnie Pasciuto-Wood. In this post, Marnie talks about what it’s been like joining Mozilla and what keeps her busy and inspired outside of work.

How would you describe your role on the Test Pilot team?

Well, right now I feel like I’m still ramping up. Sometimes I think everything makes sense, but then BLAM, something sneaks up and surprises me. That said, I’m the Engineering Program Manager for the Test Pilot team. I started in mid-November, the day before the Quantum launch, and 3 weeks before the All-Hands in Austin.

If I were to describe my role in two words, I would say “cat wrangler,” where the cat is scheduling, planning, managing workloads, and agile project management for the various projects under the Test Pilot umbrella. I’m not there yet (see above, ramping up), but I’m working my way there.

What does a typical day at Mozilla look like for you?

Meetings! On the Test Pilot team, we have folks all over the world, so the mornings and early afternoons are stacked full of meetings. Towards the latter part of the afternoon, I have down time where I can deal with any tasks I need to accomplish before the next set of meetings start on the following day.

Where were you before Mozilla?

I was at my last company for 7.5 years. Throughout my tenure there, I had various roles: UX Designer, Technical Project Manager, and finally Engineering Program Manager which I loved the most. In that role, I ran the hosted, on premise, and cloud software programs for my company.

On Test Pilot, what are you most looking forward to and why?

I’m most excited about getting new, valuable, tested features into Firefox. I love that we have this platform to interact with our users and gather feedback about potential changes to the browser.

What do you do, outside of work?

I have two kids (15 and 9) that keep me pretty busy. I coach each of their soccer teams in both the spring and the fall. I also help out with their other activities: basketball, lacrosse, cross country, and Girl Scouts. In addition, every week I play goalie for my futsal team. Futsal is similar to soccer, but played indoors and only 5 v. 5. And finally, we’ve just started volunteering at the Oregon Food Bank once a week, which is amazing.

M&Ms or Reese’s Pieces?

Reese’s Pieces…kept in the fridge.

Tell me something most people at Mozilla don’t know about you.

A few months before I joined Mozilla, my family and I spent 5 weeks traveling through western Europe and England. We flew into London and from there visited: Bath, Paris, Barcelona, Munich, Füssen, popped into Austria for 20 minutes, Bamberg, Rothenburg ob der Tauber, Berlin, Brussels, Bruges, Haarlem, and Amsterdam. It was an experience I’ll never forget, and we’re trying to plan another (shorter!) trip to a country we haven’t visited.

Welcome Marnie to the Test Pilot Team! was originally published in Firefox Test Pilot on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Air Mozilla: The Joy of Coding - Episode 128

Mozilla planet - wo, 14/02/2018 - 19:00

The Joy of Coding - Episode 128 mconley livehacks on real Firefox bugs while thinking aloud.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Air Mozilla: The Joy of Coding - Episode 128

Mozilla planet - wo, 14/02/2018 - 19:00

The Joy of Coding - Episode 128 mconley livehacks on real Firefox bugs while thinking aloud.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Daniel Pocock: What is the best online dating site and the best way to use it?

Mozilla planet - wo, 14/02/2018 - 18:25

Somebody recently shared this with me, this is what happens when you attempt to access Parship, an online dating site, from the anonymous Tor Browser.

Experian is basically a private spy agency. Their website boasts about how they can:

  • Know who your customers are regardless of channel or device
  • Know where and how to reach your customers with optimal messages
  • Create and deliver exceptional experiences every time

Is that third objective, an "exceptional experience", what you were hoping for with their dating site honey trap? You are out of luck: you are not the customer, you are the product.

When the Berlin wall came down, people were horrified at what they found in the archives of the Stasi. Don't companies like Experian and Facebook gather far more data than this?

So can you succeed with online dating?

There are only three strategies that are worth mentioning:

  • Access sites you can't trust (which includes all dating sites, whether free or paid for) using anonymous services like Tor Browser and anonymous email addresses. Use fake photos and fake all other data. Don't send your real phone number through the messaging or chat facility in any of these sites because they can use that to match your anonymous account to a real identity: instead, get an extra SIM card that you pay for and top-up with cash. One person told me they tried this for a month as an experiment, expediently cutting and pasting a message to each contact to arrange a meeting for coffee. At each date they would give the other person a card that apologized for their completely fake profile photos and offering to start over now they could communicate beyond the prying eyes of the corporation.
  • Join online communities that are not primarily about dating and if a relationship comes naturally, it is a bonus.
  • If you really care about your future partner and don't want your photo to be a piece of bait used to exploit and oppress them, why not expand your real-world activities?
Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

The Mozilla Blog: A Perspective: Firefox Quantum’s Tracking Protection Gives Users The Right To Be Curious

Mozilla planet - wo, 14/02/2018 - 18:00

In the physical world, we don’t wear our ID on our foreheads. This is convenient because we can walk around with a reasonable expectation of privacy and let our curiosity take us to interesting places. That shoe store you sauntered into because they had a pair that caught your eye has no idea who you are, where you live, or anything about you. More importantly, any attempt by that shoe store to have an employee follow you around would not only be impractical, but would be met with some serious side-eye from potential customers.

In the digital world, this isn’t true. Useful web technologies that make the sites you visit convenient and powerful can also be co-opted to track you wherever you go. The same incredible economies of scale that allow billions of people worldwide to stay connected also allow for the implementation of inexpensive and powerful methods of tracking. The profits from the sale of one pair of shoes allows the online shoe store to track thousands of people in the hopes of turning them into customers.

You would notice a beleaguered shoe store employee following you around, but you’re unlikely to notice most forms of online tracking. We’ve all had the experience where ads magically seem to follow you around, in a practice known as ‘retargeting’, and it’s often unnerving for users. However, the reality is that online tracking is mostly invisible. What’s more is that it’s used to create a profile that ties together as much data as possible in a practice called “cookie syncing” in an effort to predict your habits and preferences, in the hopes that the ads and recommendations you get are more likely to trigger your behavior in a desirable way.

Sometimes, information about you can be helpful. For instance, finding out what the most popular accessories are for your new phone can help you make better decisions about what to buy. Of greater concern is the lack of consent. In the real world, we generally look before we leap, but on the Internet, there’s no way to ‘preview’ the tracking of a site before you click a link. Often without your knowledge, information about you and your visit is compiled into an online profile that can be shared and sold to others without your knowledge.

What’s true for shoes also applies to ideas. Another often overlooked inconvenience is how tracking impacts people’s ability to explore new areas of the web. Against the backdrop of growing online bubbles and polarized media, if all the content you get recommendations for is in the same line of thought, how much are you able to explore what’s across the political line?

With 40% of US internet users saying they have recently used ad blockers, people clearly have an intuitive understanding that trackers and ads can be annoying, but do ad blockers do what they want?

Many in the tech world have been looking into this. When the companies providing the ad blocker are also the world’s biggest advertising networks, will it truly give you the tools to be inconspicuously curious?

Google Chrome’s approach is focused on annoying ads. Its ad blocker blocks ads, but it does nothing against invisible trackers or tracking ads that comply with the standards of the Better Ads Coalition, in which Facebook and Google are key partners. Even Apple’s Intelligent Tracking Protection has a set of rules that favor trackers operated by sites that users visit at least once a day. Unsurprisingly, Google and Facebook are the sites most likely to fall into this category.

If you’re not using Firefox Quantum today and care about your privacy, I encourage you to give Firefox Quantum a try. With Tracking Protection turned on, you’ll get a web that lets you browse freely with fewer worries about pesky trackers, built by an independent organization that doesn’t run an ad network.

The post A Perspective: Firefox Quantum’s Tracking Protection Gives Users The Right To Be Curious appeared first on The Mozilla Blog.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

A Perspective: Firefox Quantum’s Tracking Protection Gives Users The Right To Be Curious

Mozilla Blog - wo, 14/02/2018 - 18:00

In the physical world, we don’t wear our ID on our foreheads. This is convenient because we can walk around with a reasonable expectation of privacy and let our curiosity take us to interesting places. That shoe store you sauntered into because they had a pair that caught your eye has no idea who you are, where you live, or anything about you. More importantly, any attempt by that shoe store to have an employee follow you around would not only be impractical, but would be met with some serious side-eye from potential customers.

In the digital world, this isn’t true. Useful web technologies that make the sites you visit convenient and powerful can also be co-opted to track you wherever you go. The same incredible economies of scale that allow billions of people worldwide to stay connected also allow for the implementation of inexpensive and powerful methods of tracking. The profits from the sale of one pair of shoes allows the online shoe store to track thousands of people in the hopes of turning them into customers.

You would notice a beleaguered shoe store employee following you around, but you’re unlikely to notice most forms of online tracking. We’ve all had the experience where ads magically seem to follow you around, in a practice known as ‘retargeting’, and it’s often unnerving for users. However, the reality is that online tracking is mostly invisible. What’s more is that it’s used to create a profile that ties together as much data as possible in a practice called “cookie syncing” in an effort to predict your habits and preferences, in the hopes that the ads and recommendations you get are more likely to trigger your behavior in a desirable way.

Sometimes, information about you can be helpful. For instance, finding out what the most popular accessories are for your new phone can help you make better decisions about what to buy. Of greater concern is the lack of consent. In the real world, we generally look before we leap, but on the Internet, there’s no way to ‘preview’ the tracking of a site before you click a link. Often without your knowledge, information about you and your visit is compiled into an online profile that can be shared and sold to others without your knowledge.

What’s true for shoes also applies to ideas. Another often overlooked inconvenience is how tracking impacts people’s ability to explore new areas of the web. Against the backdrop of growing online bubbles and polarized media, if all the content you get recommendations for is in the same line of thought, how much are you able to explore what’s across the political line?

With 40% of US internet users saying they have recently used ad blockers, people clearly have an intuitive understanding that trackers and ads can be annoying, but do ad blockers do what they want?

Many in the tech world have been looking into this. When the companies providing the ad blocker are also the world’s biggest advertising networks, will it truly give you the tools to be inconspicuously curious?

Google Chrome’s approach is focused on annoying ads. Its ad blocker blocks ads, but it does nothing against invisible trackers or tracking ads that comply with the standards of the Better Ads Coalition, in which Facebook and Google are key partners. Even Apple’s Intelligent Tracking Protection has a set of rules that favor trackers operated by sites that users visit at least once a day. Unsurprisingly, Google and Facebook are the sites most likely to fall into this category.

If you’re not using Firefox Quantum today and care about your privacy, I encourage you to give Firefox Quantum a try. With Tracking Protection turned on, you’ll get a web that lets you browse freely with fewer worries about pesky trackers, built by an independent organization that doesn’t run an ad network.

The post A Perspective: Firefox Quantum’s Tracking Protection Gives Users The Right To Be Curious appeared first on The Mozilla Blog.

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Air Mozilla: Weekly SUMO Community Meeting, 14 Feb 2018

Mozilla planet - wo, 14/02/2018 - 18:00

Weekly SUMO Community Meeting This is the SUMO weekly call

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Air Mozilla: Weekly SUMO Community Meeting, 14 Feb 2018

Mozilla planet - wo, 14/02/2018 - 18:00

Weekly SUMO Community Meeting This is the SUMO weekly call

Categorieën: Mozilla-nl planet

Pagina's